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Have around 300 pilots left RYR lately?

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Have around 300 pilots left RYR lately?

Old 7th Apr 2014, 16:54
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LNIDA,

I guess someone was going to get the wrong end of the stick, and that person is you.

Originally Posted by LNIDA
As for GA pilots being better because they make more NPA your having a laugh, they are not doing it in a 60t airliner down to minima with approach speeds of 145knts in foul weather
If you can find where that's said, I'll post you 10. Finally, quantify does not mean what you obviously think it does.
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Old 7th Apr 2014, 20:49
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To try and put some perspective on the matter I'll look back over a long career with almost 10 airlines of various hue and creed in a variety of countries. Once upon a time the 'airlines' that flew big noisy jets (outside BA in the 70's) wanted experienced pilots to join their ranks. They were anticipating expansion and wanted suitable new blood. Also the very basic type of a/c we flew, in a very basic ATC environment (other than ATH Greece had little or no radar, and its islands had an ILS/NDB/DME if you were lucky, but not on all runways) required good solid airmanship from the 2 man crew. This was not a suitable environment to train cadets, you needed to have a good aviation grounding beforehand. The training was, 1st, how to fly the a/c; 2nd how to do it according to simple SOP's that were based on FCTM; 3rd how to operate the a/c in a variety of roles and environments. After 7 years or so, and >5000hrs with good prof checks on record you could expect assessment for any command vacancies.
Nowadays the a/c are sophisticated, reliable, include a wealth of navigation information and have excellent autopilots with a wealth of capabilities. Likewise ATC has improved where non-radar is the exception, as is an NPA. There are ILS's all over the place with helpful radar to hold your hand to find them. If not then the FMC will do it for you and tell if you are hot & high or low & slow, and if you are anywhere near where you are supposed to be. As a result the daily routes can be flown by guys who have read and digested the FCTM & SOP manuals and can be trusted to follow them to the letter. This is on a good ideal day, which 95% of them are. A SID is a SID and a STAR is a STAR and an ILS is an ILS and they are joined together by airways loaded into an FMC. Even NPA's can be flown in VNAVPTH or RNAV GNSS just like an ILS. No sweat. The 'flying' part has been reduced to the first 400-1000' after liftoff and the last 500-200' to touchdown. Just follow the SOP's and you can start at A, operate the a/c as per flight plan and arrive in the slot at B. 95% of the time. The odd non-radar airfield, or circle to land is an adventurous day out, and they even have SOP's for those to fly them on the autopliot. Thus a short-haul jet (perhaps even more so the big jets) have become an airborne playstation. Read the instructions and a cadet pilot with CPL can do it. This was not the case in 70's & 80's, but it is now: or so it would seem.
Amazingly some still seem to get it wrong, but that's not the fault of the cadet system. There will be a captain (experienced) who either gets it wrong or allows it to develop into wrong. The cadet can always be over-ruled. The difference I saw amongst cadets was attitude. Some were very sharp and remained so, some were a little blunt and never really cut it. Some were average, competent, but became bored and complacent. They then became blunt but did not realise it. They you had to watch out for.
To summarise: the handling skills are less important now than they used to be with more emphasis on operating skills and following SOP's to save your soul. (Not that I wish it to be so) but still the vital ingredient is attitude. That is where I've seen the selection process at entry level become suspect. The idea that good training = an extensive SOP rule book and a good pilot = one who follows it to the letter can be a workable model, but only if the correct professional, focused, interested attitude is there and maintained. I found some of the average guys taking it for granted that after 3-4 years they would be a captain and earning the big bucks before 30. Their focus was in the wrong place and when time came they were still only average and struggling. Some woke up and scraped through, but should they have been in the industry in the first place?
So, if RYR, ez, or any other of the new boys on the block are considered to have a solid training regime suitable for the modern world and large modern airliners e.g. B777, A340/380 then why not poach them. With the correct attitude they could be very valuable. Would I employ them to fly IFR/VFR around the islands & highlands; I doubt it. But as we saw in the Qantas A380 engine blow out scenario some of the old airmanship methods are necessary, occasionally.

Last edited by RAT 5; 7th Apr 2014 at 21:51.
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Old 7th Apr 2014, 21:13
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Interesting post Rat 5.
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Old 7th Apr 2014, 21:37
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Thank you Rat 5. It was an excellent Post. I m interested to know which side of the debate you fall though. It does seem as though we are moving into new territory for Ryanair as their rate of attrition is increasing and as new aircraft arrive, they want to replace and add Pilots who really have no experience and to an extent never seen before. As I am sure you are aware it is my view that these levels are not safe, even with the quality of equipment that you are talking about and operating in the all radar environment of Europe.

Dr Jones, what type of aircraft do you fly?
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Old 7th Apr 2014, 22:05
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What's always confused me, as a pilot and not a business-man, is why, if what I hear is true, RYR and perhaps others shy away from experienced F/O's. Airlines go bust, sometimes they wilt from the competition pressure of the of the LoCo's. It is almost as if there is a law of the jungle out there and the expansion of the strongest is accelerated by the demise of their prey. In a dod eat dog capitalistic environment that seems to be the rule. But why then do the expanding airlines not absorb those whom they have put to the sword? They are expanding and need new commanders. They expand and promote from within, faster then their own F/O's can gain the experience. Yet out there in the market place are the experienced pilots who were in the wrong place at the wrong time waiting to offer their services. Rejected in preference to a 150hr cadet. It is said the LoCo's make a profit from them. Perhaps so, but what is the cost, risk & time spent on getting them onto the line and up to speed as safe pilots? An experienced type rated F/O can be released on line with 4-6 weeks max. A cadet from start of TQ training will take over 6 months. Where is the common sense in that. If an accountant can show the cadet scheme makes more financial sense them I presume the board will buy it, but is it really true? It does seem a daft model where experience is a penalty, especially when we see some of the accidents being executed very month. Is it only me, or are we reading more often about prangs than 10 years ago? Every month there seem to be stories of someone somewhere in the world making a perfectly serviceable a/c not land at the desired point.
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Old 7th Apr 2014, 22:07
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Polax 52 - I fly Citation Excel.


I'm not doubting flying an airline in poor weather conditions can not be tricky, but on the flip side going to an airport you have never been too before and doing an NDB approach down to Mins at night can be just as challenging.
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Old 8th Apr 2014, 03:56
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Journey man

I'll try and keep it very simple for you: I fly around 3 times a week with ex Ryanair pilots, occasionally i also fly with pilots who have come from a variety of other airlines, all were type rated on the 737 prior to joining my airline.

So my comments about their skill level is based on personal experience objectively, they are well trained and their SOP compliance & CRM skills are of an high order, it is significant that we now sim check First officers from all other airlines other than Ryanair, my airlines has quantified that the training risk from pilots from Ryanair is so low that it does not justify the time and cost of a sim check pre offer of employment, conversely our experience with F/o's from other airlines is the opposite.

If i misunderstand the point you are making I apologise, you seem to me? to be saying that there is no evidence that Ryanair pilots receive better training than other airlines, a simple yard stick is the minimum number of sectors a pilot is required to complete before being released for final line check and released to line if the check is passed.

Ryanair min 80 sectors
Norwegian 40
Monarch 10
Jet2 20

In Ryanair these are pilots that are in general without any previous airline experience, In Norwegian these are for pilots previously type rated on either the CL/NG (including ex Ryanair pilots) Norwegian MPL student will do at least 100 sectors, In Monarch this target (rarely met) is for all pilots previously rated or not, Jet2 in general is more threshold based i understand?



So for my simple mind please quantify the point your are making? more importantly on what facts/personal experience are you basing it on please, i do this for a living............

Last edited by LNIDA; 8th Apr 2014 at 04:07.
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Old 8th Apr 2014, 09:17
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Ryanair's minimum of 80 sectors is no doubt financially driven.

Jet2's 20 sectors minimum is for TRd or similar type experienced pilots and it's 40 minimum for Abos.

Anyway, you can't tell the quality of instruction simply from the minimum number of sectors required and arguably you'd need more training sectors if the instruction is poor.
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Old 8th Apr 2014, 09:51
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To be fair there is also a consideration about the route network. If the network included only the large, major, radar, ILS type airports then the required number of sectors might seem quite low. They are all the same structure and you fly the numbers and do as ATC tells you. You can study the taxi charts before the flight, but everything else is pretty standard.
If the network covers a variety of airfield types, approaches and differing types of environment during all 4 seasons it might explain why some carriers would like a fuller exposure before releasing raw cadets on to the line. That seems a common sense philosophy. I'm not saying that a line training roster is constructed with such an overview, sadly, but it could explain why there are more sectors with some than others if it was. Another idea could be that, given the low experience of many captains in todays rapidly expanding airlines, it is thought wise to have the cadets at a higher level of proficiency before being teamed up with a new boy in LHS.
I wonder if any of the above is indeed in the thinking of those who decide such matters.
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Old 8th Apr 2014, 11:21
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"Ryanair's minimum of 80 sectors is no doubt financially driven."

How does that work? I understand that FR pilots don't get paid whilst on line training, but the safety pilot will...
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Old 8th Apr 2014, 11:34
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Safety pilot is only there for the first few sectors. Once released, the cadet starts getting paid.
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Old 8th Apr 2014, 11:51
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Exactly, which is why I'm intrigued about LSM's point about 80 sectors being 'financially driven'? At all times there will be two pilots on the flight deck getting paid.
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Old 8th Apr 2014, 16:14
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As a matter of interest, when I joined Laker Airways in 1979, we were expected to check out on the DC-10 in 12 sectors. Most of us had no trouble achieving this but then we were all quite experienced and certainly all of us had considerably more than 200 hours in our logbooks.
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Old 8th Apr 2014, 16:59
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Ryanair's minimum of 80 sectors is no doubt financially driven.
It's 66 sectors actually. And I don't see your point as the FO gets paid after being safety pilot released (12 sectors).
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Old 8th Apr 2014, 17:53
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Despite the thread generally been about Ryanair! I know of a mate who's started at Jet2 this year, he's current and a very experienced Boeing pilot - he's on 50% reduced salary until training is finished; doing 5 simulator sessions, 2 jump-seat flights on an aircraft he's flown for nearly 10 years and 20 sectors training planned...maybe Pilot Apprentices are J2 thing!?!

This industry and it's management are nothing short of pathetic... The world has lost its way....it's not just FR! And I gather recruitment at Yorkshires Airline is ongoing due to its turnover, present intake not overly impressed either...
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Old 8th Apr 2014, 18:02
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Originally Posted by pudoc
It's 66 sectors actually. And I don't see your point as the FO gets paid after being safety pilot released (12 sectors).
Not my point, an ex Ryanair guy told me he was on reduced cash until he passed his final line check.
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Old 8th Apr 2014, 19:35
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Spandex; it's true that the salery during line training is reduced, but then again, the line trainers get extra pay. All in all, I can't see it being financially driven
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Old 8th Apr 2014, 20:45
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Yes but the line trainers pay is increased all the time therefore you need to keep the cadets on low pay as long as possible to balance it. I can not see it not being financially driven. Spandex isn't so naive.
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Old 8th Apr 2014, 21:08
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LTC get +10 euro gross psbh
Cadet gets -20 euro less psbh

Ryanair keeps a minimum of 10 euro psbh for every cadet during the whole linetraining + the rest of the month in which the first linecheck took place (i.e. checked on March 1 = rest of March on -20€ pay)
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Old 8th Apr 2014, 23:30
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Anecdotes... anecdotes...

Putting the word "quantified" in an anecdote... well, it looks jolly good, but isn't the same thing as an actual, verifiable measurement.

I'm sure the boys and girls of FR are very well trained. I don't see evidence that they're not. Are they better trained than BA? Better trained than EasyJet? Come on, LNIDA. At least put some perspective on things. It's all very vague...
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