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-   -   Joining Qatar Airways (QR) - all you need to know about it (threads merged) (https://www.pprune.org/middle-east/288896-joining-qatar-airways-qr-all-you-need-know-about-threads-merged.html)

ask26 8th Feb 2011 18:58

Also some of you guys say one option is jumping ship. Then you get a job offer with an airline elsewhere.

a) Won´t they contact QR for references....
b) What if that airline flies into QR or the GCC. You do a nightstop, go through customs, your passport is scanned, then what...

Best to pay the bond off surely.

broompusher 9th Feb 2011 03:43

F/O jet requirement
 
Skindogg,

Suggest you re-read the jet requirements. There is no mention of Airline time.

First Officers
  • Minimum of 1,000 hours in one of the following categories:
    - Multi Crew, Multi Engine Jet Aircraft
    - Command Turbo-Prop above 20,000kg MTOW
    - High Performance Military Jets
  • Valid ICAO ATPL or Frozen ATPL
  • Valid Instrument Rating
  • Valid Class 1 Medical.
  • ICAO English Proficiency Minimum level 4.
  • Age below 50 years at date of joining
  • Experience Commensurate With Age
I would read that as corporate jet qualifies as long as it is multi crew (as certified by the manufacturer)

Skindogg 9th Feb 2011 03:45

I stand corrected!

loc22550 9th Feb 2011 09:26

One of our New EVPO speciality so far seems to be: To freeze everything!! (transfer,upgrade...so..maybe salary increase as well!:ooh:)

AriGold 9th Feb 2011 19:25

Qatar Executive
 
Does anybody have any contact information with regards to Qatar Executive? I am a Challenger 605 pilot looking for work.

Cheers!

showbiz 10th Feb 2011 01:28

Clarification please.
 
The ancillary benefits are on top of the basic salary of 6600/9500USD correct? In other words, You can expect to get the quoted figures "in your hand" without deductions for Utilities, Medical etc.

loc22550 10th Feb 2011 09:52

You can expect to get the quoted figures when you fly at least 70 hours a month indeed:
6600/9500u$= Basic(5000/7300U$) + flight allowance ("assuming" you fly 70 hours)
On top of that -transport allowance= 410 U$/month
-utilities allowance = 82 U$/month
-Meal allowance.

Fubaliera 10th Feb 2011 12:22

Meal allowance in Bangalore is 23USD :O per day. From there it goes up depends on destination.

gottofly 10th Feb 2011 13:26

thank you for the detailed breakdown.Can any1 confirm if theres about 90 hrs flying for captains on the 320?

are they still giving 4 bedroom villas to captains or are they providing housing allowance instead?


is there a pre-medical or proper medical during the interview?

for family guys,is it easy to get a decent maid and is it ok for a woman to wear decent western clothes and go out or drive alone to malls etc?

many thanks .have an interview coming up soon.

Paper Lad 10th Feb 2011 13:48

Capts fly 85 - 90hrs per month on 320.
4 bed villa or you can ask for the allowance and do your own thing.
It's fine for women to drive and wear western dress whilst out and about.
No medical during interview but two when you join, one for the resident permit plus the normal aeromedical.
Getting a maid is fine but not easy due to local rules. No live-in maids for single guys.

PL

Fubaliera 10th Feb 2011 14:36

If your wife is not on a wheel chair the locals will offer her 500-1000 riyals for sex at the malls and supermarkets:eek: And dont be surprised if another cap or f/o has an affair with your wife as it has happened many times in company accomadation. You fly and the wife rides.

iggy 11th Feb 2011 06:06

"Fuba, you have just shown to the world how sick you are "


My wife had a "secret admirer" in company accomodation. One day while I was out flying he came to our window and showed her his attributes. Later we found out that he was also QR staff. I personally handed a complaint letter to HR manager, but no actions were taken against that guy, who for some time, I could see walking and humming around my place. Now, please tell me again who is the sick one in QR.

So, Kijangjim, I understand that you want to give credit to the company when it is due, but you should NEVER try to stop people from telling their experiences in QR. I could write several thick books about it, not because I don't want QR to have pilots, but to give a clearer picture of what the guys who are joining QR can find there.

Respectfully, if you don't like bad comments about the goat airline just don't bother to read.

Peace and love.

non0 11th Feb 2011 06:12

... lets try to change the subj

Qatar CEO rips AEA remarks on Gulf carriers



full article here

Any comment?

loc22550 11th Feb 2011 06:21

Iggy: :ok:
True facts should be revealed..not hidden.

Fubaliera 11th Feb 2011 08:11

Kingjam
You are a company kiss a$$, or are a management wannabe. If the truth hurts,get lost

flyzede 11th Feb 2011 09:14

Guys, appart from this being disgusting you have to agree with me:
I just think that if your wife "rides" someone else... there's something wrong with your marriage! :rolleyes:

169west 11th Feb 2011 09:32


I just think that if your wife "rides" someone else... there's something wrong with your marriage!
how vintage are you flyzede! Nowadays you need to be a little bit more sporty! She can ride all she wants, as long she is not doing it for free! :ok:

sleeve of wizard 11th Feb 2011 13:44

QATAR Airways starting 01MAY11 is gradually increasing Doha – Singapore service. From 01MAY11, service increase from 7 to 10 weekly. Service then increases to 13 weekly from 28SEP11
The new flight is operated by Airbus A330-200 aircraft. Schedule:

QR638 DOH0155 – 1505SIN 77W D
QR640 DOH0700 – 1930SIN 332 357
QR639 SIN0225 – 0515DOH 77W D
QR641 SIN2100 – 2345DOH 332 357
QR640/641 operates Day x6 from 28SEP11:ok:

Fubaliera 11th Feb 2011 14:42

So is your mama kingjam:D

non0 11th Feb 2011 19:09

Qatar Airways CEO Hits Back At Comments Made By Association Of European Airlines Secretary General Over Dramatic Rise Of Gulf Carriers

Akbar Al Baker Slams Remarks Made At Aviation Gathering In Washington DC

10 February 2011

Doha, QATAR – Qatar Airways Chief Executive Officer Akbar Al Baker today hit back at comments made by the Secretary General of the Association of European Airlines about the dramatic rise of Gulf carriers and their impact on the global aviation industry.

The boss of the Doha-based carrier said comments made by Ulrich Schulte-Strathaus at a recent gathering of the International Aviation Club in Washington DC were “factually incorrect and unfounded”.

Al Baker said: “I recently came across the remarks made by a colleague of ours, Mr Schulte-Strathaus, Secretary General of the Association of European Airlines, about how global competition needs to be addressed by the International Civil Aviation Organisation, similar to what the industry is calling for in the domain of the environment.

“Mr. Schulte-Strathaus focused on the competitive pressure that airlines from the Gulf are posing on their counterparts elsewhere. Usually I would choose not to comment directly on calls to find ways to limit the growth of the Gulf carriers, including Qatar Airways.

“However, because Mr. Schulte-Strathaus chose to address one of the august forums of aviation visionaries in the world, I thought I needed to put the record straight. Mr. Schulte-Strathaus in his remarks included a number of “facts” which I beg to disagree with. The so-called facts that he alluded to were as follows:

The geographical proximity of Doha, Dubai, and Abu Dhabi gives rise to an anomaly in aviation. The fact of the matter is that it is quite common to have a multitude of hubs in close proximity: Singapore and Kuala Lumpur; Paris, Amsterdam, and London; Frankfurt, Zurich, and Vienna; the airports of New York and so on.
Therefore, having three major hubs within a 280 miles radius is not a novelty in aviation.

Mr. Schulte-Strathaus raises the issue that the governments of the UAE and Qatar consider the airlines of the Gulf as part of national strategy and as a “tool of a vertically integrated economic chain”. Again, he is trying to highlight a norm rather than an anomaly in the current geopolitical structure.
I would like to pose a question to Mr. Schulte-Strathaus: Can he tell me of any country of the world which does not consider its air transport industry, be that an individual airline or a multitude of them, as part of national interests? Was it not the case that the US government provided its airlines with cash outlays and tax breaks, as well as war insurance subsidies after September 11 in order to ensure the continuity of the US air transport industry? Is it not the case even further that the position of the US has consistently been to preserve the national identity and ownership of the US airlines? And on the other side of the Atlantic, doesn’t Mr. Schulte-Strathaus consider the billions of Euros that are allowed under the EU laws to pump into airlines for “restructuring purposes” as a manifestation of the strategic national interest in supporting national airlines and what they represent economically and socially?

Doesn’t Mr. Schulte-Strathaus consider the control over the overwhelming majority of slots in a highly congested region as a lopsided support to national airlines against new entrants including airlines who are coming from airports where European airlines can operate freely without any reciprocity in terms of slots quality?

Mr. Schulte-Strathaus is comparing the aircraft order book of Gulf airlines with that of the US carriers in the long-haul wide body arena as if those airlines plan to dump capacity. The comparison itself is extremely erroneous! The backbone of the US air transport industry is domestic operations. The portion of the capacity deployed internationally as a ratio of the total capacity deployed by the US airlines is minimal. Of course, geography and population spread requires such a structure.
The airlines of the Gulf operate from small countries and they are operating regionally in an area which is 3 times the size of the US, and internationally with a network that stretches across the globe. We operate with the minimum cost per seat mile in mind. We operate with the minimum environmental footprint in mind as well. The average age of our fleet is around 5 years only. We do not keep airplanes operating for 20 to 30 years. Therefore, you will find that in order to maintain the lowest cost in seat mile, and the greatest appeal to customers, our order book is higher than elsewhere because we maintain a young fleet.

This is not a new strategy. It has been applied extremely successfully by the airlines of the Asia Pacific. Asian airlines have almost the same fleet age and a comparable unit cost. Furthermore, some Asian airlines are still owned by governments and they are definitely part of the national interests of their countries. Yet, we do not see Mr. Schulte-Strathaus signalling them as part of the threat to the future of the aviation industry.

Mr. Schulte-Strathaus goes further in saying that two of the Gulf airlines have never made a profit. First of all, I would like to ask him how does he know that since Etihad Airways and Qatar Airways are not publishing their financial reports as yet? But from the principle standpoint: If profit was the only reason why airlines buy airplanes, as he is insinuating, then the net result of buying new airplanes in this whole industry should have been negative during the last decade.
The crux of the matter in what Mr. Schulte-Strathaus is saying lies in his remark that “these (Gulf) airlines are efficient, they have extremely low unit cost yet deliver consistently high service quality. They have clarity of vision and decisiveness of action. They also have the full and enthusiastic support of their domestic political institutions.” I couldn’t say that better! Is it a mistake to be efficient and to have a low unit cost? Is it wrong from governments to be supportive to their national interests? Is Mr. Schulte-Strathaus advocating that airlines which have high unit cost and do not deliver consistently high service quality should be protected from efficient low cost and high service airlines?
Mr. Schulte-Strathaus is saying that we are driven by a “policy which is not compatible with that of the US, Europe, Australia, China, Canada, and so on.”
I’m really lost here! Most of these governments are signatories of the Agenda for Freedom brokered by IATA, which calls for free market access. In fact, even the Director General of IATA, Mr. Giovanni Bisignani, recently called upon the Canadian government to respect the liberal market access principle and avoid protectionism. Does Mr. Schulte-Strathaus advocate that this policy of liberalisation should only apply when his member airlines are the beneficiaries and not vice-versa?

Mr. Schulte-Strathaus is requesting governments to prevent additional market access in the short term! Perhaps Mr. Schulte-Strathaus should also ask governments to forego liberalisation policies, deregulation and why not foregoing market economy and resort to protectionism, inefficiencies, cartel price fixing, and anti-consumer behaviour. Where would protectionism end if his calls are heeded by the governments? Isn’t it the right of any consumer to get access to the best prices and the best value for money?
Finally, we have no problem whatsoever for ICAO to create a multilateral system along the lines of how the World Trade Organisation handles free trade. I would go even further: Why won’t we apply the WTO principles on aviation to ensure that first and foremost the rights of the consumers and free competition apply across the board?
If Europe is not investing enough in aviation infrastructure, and if Europe had developed a cost base which is becoming burdensome on some of its old establishments, and if Europe is not addressing the cost of its social safety-net in a way which maintains a competitive posture for its airlines, should then the European consumer be penalised by depriving him from cost efficient aviation services? And where does this protectionism end? Would the next target be the European low cost carriers because they managed to provide competitive services to the members of AEA? I believe the answer is clear.

The airlines of the Gulf operate from small countries and they are operating regionally in an area which is 3 times the size of the US, and internationally with a network that stretches across the globe. We operate with the minimum cost per seat mile in mind. We operate with the minimum environmental footprint in mind as well. The average age of our fleet is around 5 years only. We do not keep airplanes operating for 20 to 30 years. Therefore, you will find that in order to maintain the lowest cost in seat mile, and the greatest appeal to customers, our order book is higher than elsewhere because we maintain a young fleet.

This is not a new strategy. It has been applied extremely successfully by the airlines of the Asia Pacific. Asian airlines have almost the same fleet age and a comparable unit cost. Furthermore, some Asian airlines are still owned by governments and they are definitely part of the national interests of their countries. Yet, we do not see Mr. Schulte-Strathaus signalling them as part of the threat to the future of the aviation industry.

The European airlines were pioneers in a large number of areas. We in the Gulf airlines community have learnt a lot from them. They should accept competition and that the customer being in the driver’s seat.

Notes to Editors
Qatar Airways is one of the world’s fastest growing airlines. Following its re-launch in 1997, the Doha-based carrier currently flies a modern fleet of 94 aircraft to 98 key business and leisure destinations across Europe, Middle East, Africa, Asia Pacific and North and South America. Its fleet size will surpass 120 aircraft by 2013, by which time the global network will top 120 destinations.

Qatar Airways has ordered 80 Airbus A350s, 24 Airbus A320 Family aircraft, 60 Boeing 787s and 32 Boeing 777s, with deliveries of the latter having started in November 2007. The airline is one of the customers of the twin-deck Airbus A380 ‘super jumbos’ with five on order and scheduled for delivery from 2012, by which time the New Doha International Airport is scheduled to open.

At the 2010 Skytrax World Airline Awards, Qatar Airways was awarded World’s Best Business Class, Best Airline in the Middle East for the fifth consecutive year, World’s Best Business Class Catering, and the Staff Service Excellence Award for the Middle East. The awards are compiled from results of the annual Skytrax passenger survey in which almost 18 million travellers were polled over a 10-month period. For more information, log onto www.qatarairways.com.


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