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-   -   All borders to reopen. (https://www.pprune.org/australia-new-zealand-pacific/632861-all-borders-reopen.html)

Cafe City 3rd Jun 2021 02:39


Originally Posted by ScepticalOptomist (Post 11056131)
Of course!

Politics to extend state of emergency etc far more likely a reason that the “Victorian” strain is so “deadly”…

Yes. The “Humphrey Applby’s” of all Govts are working overtime right now.
More spin than an aft loaded Chipmunk.

jrfsp 3rd Jun 2021 04:15

So much for 99.99% effective.

"University of Melbourne researchers say there has been one hotel quarantine leak per 204 Covid-19 infected travellers"

https://www.news.com.au/national/uni...f681c0a2651be6

ruprecht 3rd Jun 2021 04:35


Originally Posted by jrfsp (Post 11056157)
So much for 99.99% effective.

"University of Melbourne researchers say there has been one hotel quarantine leak per 204 Covid-19 infected travellers"

https://www.news.com.au/national/uni...f681c0a2651be6

So.... 99.5% effective?

jrfsp 3rd Jun 2021 04:38


Originally Posted by ruprecht (Post 11056161)
So.... 99.5% effective?

We wouldn't be flying if engines had a 0.5% failure rate.

C441 3rd Jun 2021 04:48


"University of Melbourne researchers say there has been one hotel quarantine leak per 204 Covid-19 infected travellers"
Add in the non-Covid infected passengers and 99.9% effective is looking pretty reasonable….

Dannyboy39 3rd Jun 2021 07:35


Originally Posted by jrfsp (Post 11056162)
We wouldn't be flying if engines had a 0.5% failure rate.

Jesus... are you really looking at it like this?

Cafe City 4th Jun 2021 02:07


Originally Posted by jrfsp (Post 11056162)
We wouldn't be flying if engines had a 0.5% failure rate.

What a ridiculous analogy. Do you even get out of bed in the morning??

AerialPerspective 4th Jun 2021 02:08


Originally Posted by ruprecht (Post 11056161)
So.... 99.5% effective?

Yeh, I saw that statement in Parliament and thought to myself he better have the exact figures to back that up or he's just misled parliament and should resign.

I never watch the whackos on Sky normally but they had an interesting guy on the other day, he's an expert in demographics and he pointed out one of the potential reasons that NSW, who also has hotel quarantine, hasn't had the number or size of outbreaks that Victoria has - having lived in both cities I think he's got a point, saying that Sydney with the bulk of New South Wales' population is basically like a set of regions separated by sunken rivers, the harbour, etc. so it is not as common or as 'easy' to move around between suburbs or rather, there's not a tendency to do so with places like the northern beaches and Sutherland, etc. being almost peninsula's surrounded by rivers. In contrast, Melbourne/Vic is (to use his analogy) is like a 'fried egg', it has a centre and splays out flat in every direction with parallel roads and very few rivers or any natural barriers as such being more contiguous so the tendency is for one community to spill over into another, etc. in their daily activities, facilitating greater spreading opportunities for things like COVID.

He compared NSW and Victoria because they have similar size populations. It would be interesting to go back and see if the spread of Spanish Flu was more severe in Melbourne in the 20s than Sydney. I believe he excludes places like Perth from his analysis because WA has a vast natural barrier from other States and Adelaide/SA for similar reasons and because it's small.

Foxxster 4th Jun 2021 04:11


Originally Posted by AerialPerspective (Post 11056715)
Yeh, I saw that statement in Parliament and thought to myself he better have the exact figures to back that up or he's just misled parliament and should resign.

I never watch the whackos on Sky normally but they had an interesting guy on the other day, he's an expert in demographics and he pointed out one of the potential reasons that NSW, who also has hotel quarantine, hasn't had the number or size of outbreaks that Victoria has - having lived in both cities I think he's got a point, saying that Sydney with the bulk of New South Wales' population is basically like a set of regions separated by sunken rivers, the harbour, etc. so it is not as common or as 'easy' to move around between suburbs or rather, there's not a tendency to do so with places like the northern beaches and Sutherland, etc. being almost peninsula's surrounded by rivers. In contrast, Melbourne/Vic is (to use his analogy) is like a 'fried egg', it has a centre and splays out flat in every direction with parallel roads and very few rivers or any natural barriers as such being more contiguous so the tendency is for one community to spill over into another, etc. in their daily activities, facilitating greater spreading opportunities for things like COVID.

He compared NSW and Victoria because they have similar size populations. It would be interesting to go back and see if the spread of Spanish Flu was more severe in Melbourne in the 20s than Sydney. I believe he excludes places like Perth from his analysis because WA has a vast natural barrier from other States and Adelaide/SA for similar reasons and because it's small.


sounds like a load of bollocks. If he doesn’t think people move around in Sydney the man is an imbecile or an academic completely out of touch with reality.

We have also only had about 6 days of lockdown in Sydney versus over 100 in Melbourne. Lot more moving around in Sydney.


minigundiplomat 4th Jun 2021 04:33

AZ costs €1.8 per jab, Pfizer is between €16 and €20. That’s the reason the media tell you AZ cause blood clots but Pfizer doesn’t.

2 shots per person in Australia €95m for AZ

2 shots per person in Australia €800m for Pfizer

And why is each new strain in Sicktoria more deadly and more infectious? Last lockdown was because of the deadly and highly infectious UK strain which seems to be fairy benign now, compared to why the deadly and highly infectious Indian strain...
and not the weak as sh1t kappa strain, they’ve escalated to the killer mutant deadly Delta strain now

It will be the the lethal Antarctic strain next week

Foxxster 4th Jun 2021 04:57


Originally Posted by minigundiplomat (Post 11056749)
AZ costs €1.8 per jab, Pfizer is between €16 and €20. That’s the reason the media tell you AZ cause blood clots but Pfizer doesn’t.

2 shots per person in Australia €95m for AZ

2 shots per person in Australia €800m for Pfizer

And why is each new strain in Sicktoria more deadly and more infectious? Last lockdown was because of the deadly and highly infectious UK strain which seems to be fairy benign now, compared to why the deadly and highly infectious Indian strain...
and not the weak as sh1t kappa strain, they’ve escalated to the killer mutant deadly Delta strain now

It will be the the lethal Antarctic strain next week

thats Pfizer’s special pandemic pricing. Their ongoing pricing is significantly more than that. And already and as well all knew or suspected, the UK are mentioning the need for booster Pfizer shots to combat the variants. These will no doubt be priced at their post pandemic pricing. Worldwide, if Pfizer only give 1 billion booster shots per year, …. Ongoing for who knows how long, forever like the flu shots probably..

Amid the high-stakes fight against COVID-19, a company at the forefront of the vaccine effort is laying plans to hike prices after the crisis. A top Pfizer exec said the drugmaker aims to charge more after the "pandemic pricing environment," and an influential analyst says the company could be eying prices 3 to 4 times higher.

On an earnings call earlier this month, Chief Financial Officer Frank D’Amelio said that “obviously,” the company is “going to get more on price” after the “pandemic pricing environment." He was speaking in response to Bank of America Merrill Lynch analyst Jason Zemansky, who asked the management team about how profit margins for the program could change over time.

In short, D’Amelio explained that Pfizer expects its COVID vaccine margins to improve. Under one pandemic supply deal, Pfizer is charging the U.S. $19.50 per dose, D'Amelio said, which is “not a normal price like we typically get for a vaccine—$150, $175 per dose. So, pandemic pricing.”

AerialPerspective 4th Jun 2021 09:29


Originally Posted by Foxxster (Post 11056745)
sounds like a load of bollocks. If he doesn’t think people move around in Sydney the man is an imbecile or an academic completely out of touch with reality.

We have also only had about 6 days of lockdown in Sydney versus over 100 in Melbourne. Lot more moving around in Sydney.

He wasn’t saying that no one moves around in Sydney - he was saying as I stated that Melbourne is more contiguous than Sydney, it doesn’t have the natural barriers that provide some degree of isolation for groups of suburbs.

If you think he’s an ‘imbecile’ then perhaps post your qualifications in demographics.

t_cas 4th Jun 2021 11:52


Originally Posted by Foxxster (Post 11056745)

We have also only had about 6 days of lockdown in Sydney versus over 100 in Melbourne. Lot more moving around in Sydney.

That pretty much supports the theory.

compressor stall 4th Jun 2021 12:45

The other factor in the downstream relative cost of the vaccines is the Pf needs certain storage conditions, then mixing and strictly documented time controls during the jab day.
AZ you just get from the fridge and poke.

AerialPerspective 4th Jun 2021 13:08


Originally Posted by t_cas (Post 11056944)
That pretty much supports the theory.

Precisely what I was trying to indicate. Having lived in both cities for more than a decade each time, when I lived in Sydney and looked to go out with friends, we didn't go to the Northern Beaches, we might once in a while, whereas if a friend asked me out to lunch (absent a lockdown of course) on the other side of Melbourne from where I live, I wouldn't think twice as it's easy to get to with lots of interconnecting roads that are easy to remember and navigate because virtually everything's on a grid. That means that suburb A, has direct contact with suburb B and like a domino, people from B have exposure to suburb C and then D and so on. In Sydney/NSW, you get to D and there's a river or a harbor so there's a natural barrier which is why I think the theory has merit as it makes sense.

The other factor cited, not as strong as the other element but would have an effect is that Sydney's migrant/ethnic communities tend to be cohesive and centred on one area. In Melbourne this has never been the case, yeh, there are small pockets of concentration, but mostly, the communities are very diverse with no tendency toward 'enclaves' such as Sydney. Another reason interaction between communities is different to Melbourne.

aviation_enthus 4th Jun 2021 19:05


Originally Posted by AerialPerspective (Post 11056993)
Precisely what I was trying to indicate. Having lived in both cities for more than a decade each time, when I lived in Sydney and looked to go out with friends, we didn't go to the Northern Beaches, we might once in a while, whereas if a friend asked me out to lunch (absent a lockdown of course) on the other side of Melbourne from where I live, I wouldn't think twice as it's easy to get to with lots of interconnecting roads that are easy to remember and navigate because virtually everything's on a grid. That means that suburb A, has direct contact with suburb B and like a domino, people from B have exposure to suburb C and then D and so on. In Sydney/NSW, you get to D and there's a river or a harbor so there's a natural barrier which is why I think the theory has merit as it makes sense.

The other factor cited, not as strong as the other element but would have an effect is that Sydney's migrant/ethnic communities tend to be cohesive and centred on one area. In Melbourne this has never been the case, yeh, there are small pockets of concentration, but mostly, the communities are very diverse with no tendency toward 'enclaves' such as Sydney. Another reason interaction between communities is different to Melbourne.

You all fell for the classic “look over there!!” ploy from the Victorian government…

All this arguing about movement in Sydney vs Melbourne ignores the massive differences in contact tracing capabilities (no organised QR system) or the fact that Victoria has had 3 seperate inquiries into HQ.

However both states have had to deal with incompetence on the Federal level. It’s just that NSW appear to have a better state government at an operational level anyway.

The last “snap lockdown” was also due to a “highly virulent strain”. The lockdown last year was blamed on everything including the fact it spread easier in Victoria vs the rest of the world… There’s a trend here in the political spin. Don’t fall for it!!

SHVC 4th Jun 2021 20:49

Victoria is looking for an excuse, firstly blaming S.A not sure why it’s their fault and now they’re saying the recent guy picked the virus’s up in NSW. Victoria has been 10 steps behind ever since this pandemic started DA and his Gov are incompetent. But I’m sure Vic will vote them back in.

AerialPerspective 4th Jun 2021 21:37


Originally Posted by aviation_enthus (Post 11057112)
You all fell for the classic “look over there!!” ploy from the Victorian government…

All this arguing about movement in Sydney vs Melbourne ignores the massive differences in contact tracing capabilities (no organised QR system) or the fact that Victoria has had 3 seperate inquiries into HQ.

However both states have had to deal with incompetence on the Federal level. It’s just that NSW appear to have a better state government at an operational level anyway.

The last “snap lockdown” was also due to a “highly virulent strain”. The lockdown last year was blamed on everything including the fact it spread easier in Victoria vs the rest of the world… There’s a trend here in the political spin. Don’t fall for it!!

Seriously????

if NSW (albeit thrown under the bus by Dutton) hadn’t allowed hundreds of passengers off a ship through absolute incompetence who then spread the virus nationwide we likely would never had been in this situation.

It’s nothing more than arrogance on the part of NSW to say “Nothing to see here, somebody else’s problem/fault”.

SHVC 4th Jun 2021 22:00


Originally Posted by AerialPerspective (Post 11057175)
Seriously????

if NSW (albeit thrown under the bus by Dutton) hadn’t allowed hundreds of passengers off a ship through absolute incompetence who then spread the virus nationwide we likely would never had been in this situation.

It’s nothing more than arrogance on the part of NSW to say “Nothing to see here, somebody else’s problem/fault”.

Ruby princess is irrelevant now to the virus spread, Australia has gone many weeks covid free not one can be linked to it. also this happened very early and governments state and federal didn't know what they were doing. a ruby princess could of happened anywhere in the country at that time.

goodonyamate 4th Jun 2021 22:27

Rubbish.

nothing in the current situation is in anyway related to the ruby princess (yes, a fail…)

you might even say that the ruby princess debacle is what allowed NSW to work out how to handle this. There can be no argument that NSW has balanced COVID health with the economy and other health better than any state so far. They actually took the view that we are Australia, a country, not a series of countries run by dictators.

be parochial if you like. I prefer the ‘we are one country’ approach to that of the power hungry dictators.


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