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UK to EASA

Old 29th Aug 2020, 18:54
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UK to EASA

So Iíve been waiting for some paperwork from the UK CAA which has taken about a month longer than expected. Itís looking like Iíll miss the 4th of September deadline from the IAA to get and EASA licence conversion.

Are there any other authorities that are known to be quick with conversions?

Thanks!
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Old 29th Aug 2020, 20:12
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Austrocontrol
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Old 29th Aug 2020, 20:30
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Presumably your employer restricted you to a UK licence? That sucks. Everywhere I’ve worked (with G ref) has been happy with any EASA licence (perhaps wouldn’t all have paid for the transfer but they wouldn’t have objected ).
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Old 29th Aug 2020, 21:51
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After Brexit 2021, will g-ref aircraft company accept the EASA ATPL holder applying for a job?
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Old 29th Aug 2020, 22:30
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Does anyone know how the likes of Ryanair and Easyjet will deal with Brexit after the transition? As far as I know FR uses Irish reg aircraft in U.K. Those planes will have to become g-registered and only be flown by pilots with U.K. licenses. I guess the same would apply to any other operator that has a U.K. base??!!
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Old 30th Aug 2020, 06:05
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Ryanair already has at least one G reg aircraft and last year, they had a UK AOC granted for this eventuality. With regards crewing, the UK CAA have already said they will accept EASA licences for up to 2 years after the transition period. Also, there is nothing stopping EASA license holders from getting a UK licence and holding it alongside their EASA license (again the CAA have said a simple process will be put in place next year). If done correctly, I can't see any short term manning problems for the likes of Ryanair.

Unfortunately, it doesn't look like it will work the other way round and UK CAA licences won't be recognised at all by EASA next year.
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Old 30th Aug 2020, 06:33
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Also, there is nothing stopping EASA license holders from getting a UK licence and holding it alongside their EASA license
We are are almost certainly headed for a no deal Brexit. A European holding a UK license is one thing, but working rights (to fly a UK registered aicraft) will be another matter.
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Old 30th Aug 2020, 07:04
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the UK CAA have already said they will accept EASA licences for up to 2 years after the transition period. Also, there is nothing stopping EASA license holders from getting a UK licence and holding it alongside their EASA license (again the CAA have said a simple process will be put in place next year).
Not so fast....where is all that stated?

The current working assumptions for the UK CAA's Brexit stance are clearly stated here:



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Old 30th Aug 2020, 07:33
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I now can't find the text about the 2 year grace period, so I'll happily retract that.

There are some Q and As here on the CAA website. Close to the bottom is an answer about EU state issued commercial licenses being used on G reg aircraft...apparently just an online form is required to allow you validate and fly G reg. Admittedly "conditions apply", and I'm not sure exactly what those will be

Point taken about working rights though, that's another matter
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Old 30th Aug 2020, 07:46
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Originally Posted by CW247 View Post
We are are almost certainly headed for a no deal Brexit. A European holding a UK license is one thing, but working rights (to fly a UK registered aicraft) will be another matter.
exactly. Same it goes the way around.
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Old 30th Aug 2020, 07:52
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I think that the final outcome will be much more simple, and will reflect the very essence of brexit in the end:

British passport holders with UK CAA license will be driving G reg acfts based in the UK.
European passport holders with EASA license will fly any EU reg acft based wherever they will find a job inside the EU.
I do not see any airline sponsoring job positions both ways (right to live and work).
There won't be an agreement.

End of the story. Sadly.

Last edited by LorisBatacchi; 30th Aug 2020 at 14:28.
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Old 4th Sep 2020, 12:49
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airpasty

The 04/09 (today) deadline is for those pilots who require EASA continuity on 01/01/21. You can still apply to IAA after 04/09 and before 31/12 and the application will be processed but the exchange of licences may happen in early 2021.

Austrocontrol have a different approach where the application must be completed by 31/12/20, after which they can then no longer convert a third country UK licence. Last I spoke to them they advised me to look elsewhere as their current demand sees them busy upto 31/12.

Lots of states are honouring applications as long as they are made in 2020. There is no real way of speeding up the process by carefully choosing a quieter state as one of the major bottle necks is the UK CAA.
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Old 4th Sep 2020, 13:41
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LorisBatacchi

Some operators with a UK base are requiring British passport holders to apply to convert their UK EASA licences to an EU EASA licence and will have them apply for a UK validation in January 2021 (and shortly thereafter, a UK licence which will sit alongside the EASA licence. ) This will allow British passport holders to fly both G- registered and EASA-registered aircraft based in the UK. I can think of one operator with a UK base that is doing exactly this.

The legal right to live and work in the UK or EU (as appropriate) remains a valid concern - the UK currently seems to be more flexible with regards to this question than the EU. We will see !
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Old 4th Sep 2020, 16:27
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Originally Posted by CW247 View Post
We are are almost certainly headed for a no deal Brexit. A European holding a UK license is one thing, but working rights (to fly a UK registered aicraft) will be another matter.
unless they already have settled or pre settled status which many many eu nationals will
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Old 4th Sep 2020, 16:32
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Alrosa

hi mate

yes i know that its happening.
I had an UK license until last year.
Then my former operator went tits up and had to return my license back to Europe.
Big pain in the a$$ anyway.
After brexit i suspect it will be even worse.
Shame anyway loosing the possibility to work in both places.
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Old 7th Sep 2020, 16:24
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Regarding IAA - are you able to link to any material which confirms that IAA will still process applications submitted after the deadline?
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Old 7th Sep 2020, 18:41
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IAA website just acknowledges that applications may not be processed after the 4th. You can still try and see what they say!
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Old 8th Sep 2020, 06:48
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Emkay

From an email conversation I had with licencing personnel at IAA

Q: Are the IAA still anticipating that UK applications received through the post on or around 04/09 to still be processed and issued with an Irish EASA licence in late 2020 / early 2021?

A: That is correct. Whilst the IAA will continue to process change of SOLI applications for UK licences received after 4
th September 2020, the 12+ week turnaround of such applications means that it is unlikely that the exchange of licences will occur before the end of the year. This will obviously be an issue for pilots who need the surety of an EASA licence to continue flying in early 2021. For those pilots not using an EASA licence at present, the timings will be less of an issue.
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Old 8th Sep 2020, 11:49
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The statement that the UK will accept EASA certificates for up to 2 years now appears here under the second and third questions. In answer to Q #2 we have "EASA has stated previously that it would accept third country applications from UK Approved Training Organisations. Organisations would need to decide whether, on the basis that the UK’s membership of the EASA system ceases at the end of the transition period and if there is no mutual recognition of safety certificates between the UK and European systems, they would wish to retain both a national and an EASA approval. The CAA intends to continue to recognise current (and valid) EASA certificates for an initial period of up to two years, but no decision has been made about ongoing validity after this period." and to Q #3 "Yes. your training will be recognised for up to two years after UK participation in EASA ceases if you are training with at an ATO or DTO located outside the UK which had their Approval Certificate issued prior to the end of the transition period and which continued to be valid during the training period.". They also now say, as Alrosa says above, that an "EU issued Part-FCL" licence holder will need a UK CAA validation to fly a G reg aircraft.

The actual rule seems to come from a statutory instrument
SI 2019/645, Schedule 3, para 2: "2.—(1) Subject to paragraph 3, any other licence, certificate or approval issued by the European Aviation Safety Agency or by the national competent authority of an EEA state which continues to be in force or effective on or after exit day by virtue of Part 3 of Schedule 8 to the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018, is— (a) to continue to be in force or effective on and after exit day for the remainder of its validity period up to a maximum of 2 years (subject to any earlier suspension or cancellation by the CAA); and (b) to be treated as if it were issued by the CAA. (2) This paragraph applies only to documents issued under Regulation (EU) No 2018/1139 and EU implementing Regulations made under it."
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Old 12th Sep 2020, 02:35
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Slightly off topic but wondering if anyone could help.

the IAA have recently told me that they canít complete my SOLI transfer since I donít have any current rating. Apparently you need at least one current rating to have the licence issued and compete the transfer process.

Does anyone know any SOLI that accepts transfers without current ratings?
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