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PIA A320 Crash Karachi

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PIA A320 Crash Karachi

Old 31st May 2020, 06:53
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Warnings

In another life I did maintenance test flights which demanded, on lift off an engine to idle to check some flight guidance items, gear up and then a descent to check emergency thrust increase etc. Not only did this look awful from the cockpit and the tower (who had been informed in advance) but it set off a barrel load of aural warnings and red indicators.

Even with a meticulous preparation this scenario came as quite a shock - all the warnings from Hell, at the same time. It helps me, in a way to understand the reactions to blatant warnings in this case - and also the 737 Max departures - which were for sure not so planned for.

Warnings have their limitations. Only good procedures and discipline could have kept this crew from deteriorating into the chambers of Hell, where reason and experience no longer work. If there is a lesson here, it is not to get outside the envelope in the first place - and if you do, do everything possible to get back inside it before continuing.
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Old 31st May 2020, 08:33
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Originally Posted by lederhosen
........We have also had some crusty old pros saying that the Airbus flies just like any other aircraft. At one level that is true. But in reality in normal operation it does a lot of the work for you. Which is where we get back to the insidious skill deterioration that automation encourages. Maybe a Corona enforced reduction in flying, plus Airbus skill atrophy.

I agree with the general spirit of your post that I have quoted from. I have also avoided writing any speculation about why this happened.

But come on. The most basic function of every flight is to start descent at a reasonable range from the destination. To slow down and configure in good time. To be fully stable* by 1000' agl, (500' if visual), and to land, or go-around. One cannot blame Airbus or automation dependancy for the pilots' failure to perform this most basic series of operations.


*Which in most definitions means: Fully configured for landing. On speed. On track. On altitude/DME, and Landing checklist completed.
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Old 31st May 2020, 09:33
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Originally Posted by lederhosen
We have also had some crusty old pros saying that the Airbus flies just like any other aircraft. At one level that is true. But in reality in normal operation it does a lot of the work for you. Which is where we get back to the insidious skill deterioration that automation encourages. Maybe a Corona enforced reduction in flying, plus low blood sugar, plus Airbus skill atrophy lined up the holes in the Swiss cheese. In which case we need to be very careful when we all go flying again.
Crew factors, non compliance with SOPs and energy management are totally irrelevant on aircraft type, considering the specific event. We are not talking about a mismanaged 35 kt crosswind landing which could generate discussions on which is the most badass aircraft for pilots to deal with.
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Old 31st May 2020, 10:36
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*Which in most definitions means: Fully configured for landing. On speed. On track. On altitude/DME, and Landing checklist completed.
Exactly, from Tiger Moth to C5

And I might add as you look fwd you are satisfied with the site picture in-front for you...
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Old 31st May 2020, 10:51
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Originally Posted by MPN11
AFAIK, conjecture tending towards assumption.
5 words which describe the entire thread!
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Old 31st May 2020, 11:04
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Originally Posted by DaveJ75
5 words which describe the entire thread!
Sorry, but NO. There is a lot of good and well founded information in this thread. Lots of stuff to think about and more importantly lots of stuff to make one think about one's own mistakes of the past (e.g. regarding descent planning and stabilisation on final) and how we were saved from the same fate.

Last edited by what next; 31st May 2020 at 11:17.
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Old 31st May 2020, 11:23
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If you were talking about the final report I would agree...
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Old 31st May 2020, 11:37
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Originally Posted by bud leon
I'm sure Peter Burkill would agree with you.

I don't see anyone saying a lesser standard is acceptable due to cultural differences, the problem is thinking that cultural differences by default result in lower safety standards. It's a simplistic way of looking at things.
BA 038 was on a stabilised approach with John Coward flying it. A double engined failure occurred on short final due to an icing issue. One stage of flap was raised and they ‘impacted’ in the vicinity of the threshold.
Both pilots did their initial training at British Aerospace flying college Prestwick.

The Tenerife accident in 1977 at TFN you have referred to was most certainly a CRM / cultural issue.
The Staines accident in 1971 at LHR was again most likely caused by awful CRM issues.
Kegworth was an eye opener where poor SCCM involvement was most definitely a factor. “Swiss Cheese”

The accidents in the 1970’s with ‘western operators’ were a very distinct wake up call where human factors played a significant part. It would be true to say that a great deal of energy has gone into mitigating these threats and minimising the risks.

Look at the BOAC video posted 0242 on 28 May on this thread. Certainty I had a good laugh at this British culture / CRM Style post World War II.
What is important is that flightdeck styles need to enhance flight safety, with evolvement and develop over time as incidents/accidents occur.

If in 50 years time, the new PPRuNers look back to 2020, they will be having a chuckle at our present CRM as well.
Cultures and CRMs issues play their parts invariably in all accidents.

And for the avoidance of doubt, I am been involved in training not only ‘Asian Muslims’ but others of this Faith from the Middle East, and other Faiths as well for the last 30 years.
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Old 31st May 2020, 13:09
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Originally Posted by DaveJ75
If you were talking about the final report I would agree...
Are we positive, we are going to see this paper still in this decade?
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Old 31st May 2020, 15:17
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Originally Posted by Nightstop
Axel-Flo:

Secondly, the most effective method of losing altitude with reduced track miles is to keep the speed high, aircraft clean as long as possible to as low as possible, and then decelerate rapidly in level flight using Speedbrake, Gear and then flaps. So, if terrain, ATC and Company SOP permits the method would be selected MMO/VMO clean to 3000’ (say), activate Approach Phase, Managed speed then Speedbrake, Gear, Flaps. Use selected speed during deceleration according to taste.
That is completely wrong. You need gradient - not rate of descent.
Hold level to kill the speed using airbrake.
Drop droop, flaps and gear and resume the descent at the lowest approach speed.

A slippery aircraft like e.g the 757 will not decelerate nose down. I used to think it worthwhile to devote some time on the sim course to demonstrating that even being 400' too high at the outer marker with only 20 flap you could rescue the situation by holding level to drop everything and then resuming to be in the slot by 500'
Once in a Vanguard diverting from Heathrow over central London at FL100, Approach said the RVR on what was then 28L had gone to the magic (Cat 1) 600m and if we were interested we would be No 1.
By using the above technique we made it straight in as the first to land that morning.

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Old 31st May 2020, 15:28
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Originally Posted by scotbill
That is completely wrong. You need gradient - not rate of descent.
Hold level to kill the speed using airbrake.
Drop droop, flaps and gear and resume the descent at the lowest approach speed.

A slippery aircraft like e.g the 757 will not decelerate nose down. I used to think it worthwhile to devote some time on the sim course to demonstrating that even being 400' too high at the outer marker with only 20 flap you could rescue the situation by holding level to drop everything and then resuming to be in the slot by 500'
Once in a Vanguard diverting from Heathrow over central London at FL100, Approach said the RVR on what was then 28L had gone to the magic (Cat 1) 600m and if we were interested we would be No 1.
By using the above technique we made it straight in as the first to land that morning.
Both you and Nightstop are right. Depends how far are you from the airport. You can't slow down flaps, gear down 100miles from field even if you are 4,000ft or above higher.
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Old 31st May 2020, 15:42
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Originally Posted by Mgggpilot
Both you and Nightstop are right. Depends how far are you from the airport. You can't slow down flaps, gear down 100miles from field even if you are 4,000ft or above higher.
Agreed. In the Caribbean we used to get handed off at FL280....60 miles from the airport, arriving from the NW and landing to the east. Full speed brakes and high speed until several thousand feet (7,000?) on the approach, then slow to configure as necessary. If you acted quickly, and aggressively, you could do it without too much trouble. The meek compounded the problem.
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Old 31st May 2020, 16:20
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IMI

so please accept that what I suggested (and Nightstop was so quick to condemn) wasn’t a suggestion of normality at all. However, had one missed TOD, or at 10,000ft and reportedly 250 Krs +/-, Was there a profile that could have been flown to put a crew back in the “SAC” to fly either the ILS or a visual approach to the runway that didn’t result I. Threshold crossing speed of >200Kts, and not full flap and gear down?🤔
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Old 31st May 2020, 16:59
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Mgggpilot

You do not have a problem 100 miles from the airport!

I have been held at FL 280 by Italian ATC till 35 miles from the airport at Bari. But it was a Trident with reverse available in flight and we were able to join comfortably downwind.
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Old 31st May 2020, 17:19
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Originally Posted by scotbill
Mgggpilot

You do not have a problem 100 miles from the airport!

I have been held at FL 280 by Italian ATC till 35 miles from the airport at Bari. But it was a Trident with reverse available in flight and we were able to join comfortably downwind.
ROD ? In reverse centre engine...
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Old 31st May 2020, 18:25
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Trident , a lovely, but uneconomical aircraft .Seem to remember 10000 hp rpm on center for a/conditioning reverse on 1/3 350/365kt descent circa 16000fpm.
Useful if pushed but far from normal Ops.
More useful , the ability to descend and decelerate at the same time.
With respect to the PIA issue under discussion the 1000' gate should have given any 'professional' pilot the information he/she/it needed to make a sensible decision.
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Old 1st Jun 2020, 01:12
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Originally Posted by Twitter
In another life I did maintenance test flights which demanded, on lift off an engine to idle to check some flight guidance items, gear up and then a descent to check emergency thrust increase etc. Not only did this look awful from the cockpit and the tower (who had been informed in advance) but it set off a barrel load of aural warnings and red indicators.

Even with a meticulous preparation this scenario came as quite a shock - all the warnings from Hell, at the same time. It helps me, in a way to understand the reactions to blatant warnings in this case - and also the 737 Max departures - which were for sure not so planned for.

Warnings have their limitations. Only good procedures and discipline could have kept this crew from deteriorating into the chambers of Hell, where reason and experience no longer work. If there is a lesson here, it is not to get outside the envelope in the first place - and if you do, do everything possible to get back inside it before continuing.
I’m not sure you are being 100%. Ive never heard of any kind of FC that requires an engine to idle at liftoff. Some turbo props have auto feather and the crj 200 has auto increase in thrust, but these aren’t checked on a test flight, right after “liftoff”.
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Old 1st Jun 2020, 04:01
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Originally Posted by Mgggpilot
Both you and Nightstop are right. Depends how far are you from the airport. You can't slow down flaps, gear down 100miles from field even if you are 4,000ft or above higher.
Spot on Mggg Botom line: demands the "youknowwhatyouaredoingfactor"....
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Old 1st Jun 2020, 05:34
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Potentially an undiagnosed Covid-19 infection in the cockpit could result in crew loss of capacity and be a contributory factor. No doubt this will be tested for by the investigators. Should all operating crews be antigen tested before every flight?

Last edited by he1iaviator; 1st Jun 2020 at 06:55. Reason: Clarity
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Old 1st Jun 2020, 06:01
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So heavily dosed on medication? Now we’re getting into the realm of the absurd, or perhaps not, but this is Rumours & News, so let’s go one further and ask if, as with the case of the mysterious Malaysian pilot, they might not have spent lockdown playing games on a flight simulator. This could account for the matter-of-factness and lack of alarm in the quiet dreamy voice we hear on the recording.

Last edited by jolihokistix; 1st Jun 2020 at 06:26.
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