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The Home of Photos in Dunnunda! Mk I

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The Home of Photos in Dunnunda! Mk I

Old 2nd Mar 2012, 23:01
  #9321 (permalink)  
 
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I see it as more of a level of professionalism. In other sections of these forums there's discussions about the R-44 post crash fires so I'm seeing it as companies who want to do everything they can to make their students and staff safer during training and flying ops.

Don't the bars give a sense of pride as well? I have a lot of pride in what I do and what I've had to do to get where I am.

These are great photos and maybe some companies should look at following the example.

But that's just my 0.02c
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Old 3rd Mar 2012, 00:02
  #9322 (permalink)  
 
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I should modify my comments about the bars: HeliWest have about 20-30 aircraft and it is (as mentioned) a source of pride to achieve the position that the bars reflect. The left seat pilot could be on their Bell 212, 412 or Bo105 as well as the R22, and the right seat (student?) could well be a crewman receiving pilot training.

Nice photos, and the professionalism of the company to have a standardised, practical uniform shouldn't be a source of derision by some PPRuNers
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Old 3rd Mar 2012, 04:29
  #9323 (permalink)  
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I seem to remember a post away back where someone wanted photos of the four NSW Air Ambulance Queenair aircraft. If anyone wants them PM me and Ill have them posted.
 
Old 3rd Mar 2012, 09:01
  #9324 (permalink)  
 
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Thank you for your comments John and others. I was instructing in YZO that day at TWB. The student in the right seat is a crew man on one of our BO105s who is doing his CPL training in his own time. His flight suit is simply wearing the best gear available at the time. For me, it's the uniform they give me.
The reason for the Union Jack is that I was born in Hackney and my dad passed away this year. He served in various places, mainly in the Merchant Marine as an RO. I guess you could say that I am wearing my heart on my sleeve in memory of him.
The W***er bars are actually silver to match the silver reflective stripes on the flight suit. As we have been doing some higher profile jobs recently, it's easier to leave the bars on. Besides, I've grown accustom to them.

Good photos Scotty, keep them coming.

Last edited by CYHeli; 3rd Mar 2012 at 09:22.
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Old 3rd Mar 2012, 13:08
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Nice reply CYheli...

and for the others...he's just too long for a bone dome in an r22........me on the other hand could stack em up like a display unit.

Interesting to note in the pics, of the difference of where instructor and student are looking....not a critique, just an observation
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Old 3rd Mar 2012, 22:31
  #9326 (permalink)  
 
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Desert Flower - there are three other aircraft in that frame - two are indeed Cessnas, an engineless Birddog and a 172 IIRC. T'other is a Queenair; an ex-RFDS unit that until last year was a static display at the RFDS visitor centre in Cairns. I believe it is parked at Mareeba awaiting the building of the new Qld RFDS Visitor Centre at Longreach.
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Old 4th Mar 2012, 10:16
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Instructor is just checking no one has knocked off his car !
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Old 5th Mar 2012, 00:24
  #9328 (permalink)  
 
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Great photos Scott

I would absolutely endorse wearing of flightsuits in helicopters of every variety, and bone domes too if you can. Helicopters often give little warning of impending failure, are quick to the ground and burn well! Chances of survival and minimising permanent injury are much, much greater when wearing the above. I remember reading a report written by an RAN pilot about the issue.
Even in some fixed wing ops flight suits and helmets would be of benefit. Certainly much better than the poly/cotton ice cream suit, which would only melt to your skin in a fire.
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Old 5th Mar 2012, 07:41
  #9329 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by John Eacott
...and found why two piece nomex suits are (as I mentioned) favoured by operators around Australia, from IFR offshore to instructing?
Not having a fling-wing background John, nor ever worn a Nomex suit, I don't know the answer to this -and I'm genuinely interested in the reasons!
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Old 5th Mar 2012, 09:45
  #9330 (permalink)  
 
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The beauty of the two piece is that you can take one layer off when you are out of the aircraft. Helps stay cool.

It is funny to see one operator who insists that the jacket is really a shirt and it is to be tucked in!
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Old 5th Mar 2012, 10:35
  #9331 (permalink)  
 
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Thanks CYHeli -that was all I could come up with on my own too! Was wondering if there were other, more esoteric reasons for the 2-piece I hadn't considered ;-)

Great pix BTW and I reckon it's tremendous to see professional pilots looking professional in uniform. A pox on the juvenile muppets that apparently get their jollies denigrating people that don't conform to their warped world-view here. Keep it up!
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Old 5th Mar 2012, 21:59
  #9332 (permalink)  
 
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Great pix BTW and I reckon it's tremendous to see professional pilots looking professional in uniform. A pox on the juvenile muppets that apparently get their jollies denigrating people that don't conform to their warped world-view here. Keep it up!
Well said!
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Old 6th Mar 2012, 03:22
  #9333 (permalink)  
 
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It is funny to see one operator who insists that the jacket is really a shirt and it is to be tucked in!
Until reading this it's something I had never given any thought. Wore the two piece in civil and combat, and wore it not tucked in. Would be a pity on reflection, if the shirt was to ride up for some reason and singe, or worse, the midriff area. After all, you are wearing it for a reason, not that it's always going to save you.

The aircraft hit extremely hard on the chin bubble and just seemed to crush flat to the ground at that point. No bounce, just sort of crushed like clay. The fire was a terrific ball that immediately engulfed the entire aircraft. "As I orbited the crashed chopper, we watched in disbelief as a figure stood up and walked out through the boiling flames. I rolled around and then giving myself enough space for a 'flying approach,' we were able to land close to the chopper. "By the time we landed, just moments later, the aircraft and whatever was in it, was a burning black heap in a pile. Like I said the burning figure just walked out of it. He didn't bump into anything or even climb over nothing - there was nothing left. I know that the gunner and crew chief were burned in the crash. The ammo on the aircraft was cooking off and exploding now, not to mention that there were still a lot of bad guys shooting at us from various positions in the tree-line. I was seated in the cockpit on the right as AC and I had landed my ship next to the crash on my side. I sent my door gunner out on the left to lay down a covering fire. He had the M-60 going to town with a 100 round belt draped over his shoulder. While the gunner surpressed, the crew chief ran out to the burned pilot - it was the co-pilot. His Nomex was completely burned away. Nothing was left of his uniform or his boots except a small band around his waist where there had once been a belt and part of his flight helmet. There were no ears, eyes, hair, or facial features left. When the crew chief removed his helmet, he was to find that the foam liner had melted to his head. He appeared to feel no pain.
He did not survive.

If you are going to the extent of wearing a nomex suit, go the whole nine yards. Helmet, no nylon/polyester of any sort (never understood why pilot jackets are nylon - get leather), nomex gloves, leather watch band (worn over the nomex sleeve, not against the skin), all leather foot wear (preferably boots).

Meanwhile. Siiiigggghhhh.

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Old 6th Mar 2012, 05:02
  #9334 (permalink)  
 
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CY,

I was born in Walthamstow, and Dad was at stationed at 'Ackney nick for many years. Wild horses couldn't drag me back

RSaigon,

Two piece is all about comfort compared to the grow bags that are hot and awful to live in: especially for No 2's I recall a trial set of suits with different weaves left and right which were held together by a zip from neck to chest. The guys thought ability to unzip for a visit to the heads to far outweigh the cr@ppy material!

DSE Victoria have even made a requirement for aircrew on fires to have one piece suits, even though their firefighters on the ground wear two piece outfits. When you're resting for 5 minutes it is so much easier to remove the jacket, yet still look reasonably tidy with the nomex trousers. And what Brian says about nomex: it is only one stage of protection, along with gloves, non synthetics, boots and when possible, helmet. I'm on a break from offshore and all the operators (Bristow, CHC, HeliRes) are now in Mr Sisley's finest products when flying the bears out and back
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Old 6th Mar 2012, 06:43
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Thanks John, that makes perfect sense ;-)
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Old 6th Mar 2012, 07:01
  #9336 (permalink)  
 
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test
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Old 6th Mar 2012, 07:08
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Old 6th Mar 2012, 08:58
  #9338 (permalink)  
 
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T H A N K Y O U Mr 'A'..........

SSSS IIII GG HHHHH!!!!!

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Old 6th Mar 2012, 09:02
  #9339 (permalink)  
 
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Mr A,

p.s. Where is that book extract from please?

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Old 6th Mar 2012, 10:33
  #9340 (permalink)  
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Hey OZBD,
Is that Tyabb? I didn't think there was any sunshine over the weekend on the Peninsula. How was the show?
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