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EASY_OUT

Old 1st Jul 2016, 14:20
  #81 (permalink)  

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Don't forget, Article 50 hasn't been triggered yet, and after that we are still members of the EU for two years, so there will be no major change until late '18 at the earliest. I'm sure the pragmatists on both sides will work something out. It's in the EU's interest as well as ours to have some sensible framework.
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Old 1st Jul 2016, 16:44
  #82 (permalink)  
 
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Herod:


As far as Brexit is concerned, I think common sense departed the scene some time ago.


Presumably, EZY could transfer all their aircraft to the Irish register and set up an office in Dublin for tax purposes. In return for EZY profits being taxed in the Irish Republic, I would have thought getting an AOC from the Irish authorities would be plain sailing.
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Old 1st Jul 2016, 17:13
  #83 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Avionista
Presumably, EZY could transfer all their aircraft to the Irish register and set up an office in Dublin for tax purposes.
Provided, as previously mentioned, that EZY could by then show that at least 51% of their ownership is within the EU.

In return for EZY profits being taxed in the Irish Republic, I would have thought getting an AOC from the Irish authorities would be plain sailing.
Yes, by all accounts the IAA is very accommodating to budget airlines ...
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Old 2nd Jul 2016, 10:15
  #84 (permalink)  
 
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I would have thought getting an AOC from the Irish authorities would be plain sailing.
Unintentionally hilarious no doubt, but clearly someone has never had dealings with the saintly IAA.

Of course 51% Eu ownership and ending up on the Irish register may well not require issue of a new AOC...
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Old 2nd Jul 2016, 12:51
  #85 (permalink)  
 
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It's not just EU ownership, the relevant treaties all refer to substantial ownership and effective control.

If they want to play hardball I can see some MSs objecting to an Irish, or other, designation of U2 as a community air carrier.

Look at what Virgin America had to do to prove they were American, and you'll have an idea what games can be played with this very simple sentence. McCall will not be a EU citizen, on the day. Perhaps she can be Irish ...
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Old 2nd Jul 2016, 14:36
  #86 (permalink)  
 
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Doesn't the Stelios family share takes us to 35% straight away?
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Old 2nd Jul 2016, 16:20
  #87 (permalink)  
 
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Does the Stelios family control easyjet?
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Old 3rd Jul 2016, 07:03
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Not an English speaker here but I have a piece of paper that says I understand English so I think I understand the language of Shakespeare

So in the following text the bold part
the Union shall negotiate and conclude an agreement with that State, setting out the arrangements for its withdrawal, taking account of the framework for its future relationship with the Union
tells me that negotiations for the day after the withdraw are part of the general discussions triggered by the Article 50.

Obviously (and boy I am thankful) PPRuNe it is not a linguistics forum so let's remain on aviation. So it seems there is an abundance of countries ready to host U2 and evenutally offer nationalities to key staff - is the current CEO also the owner of the airline as to establish nationality /ownership of the airline?
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Old 3rd Jul 2016, 10:33
  #89 (permalink)  
 
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It's not just EU ownership, the relevant treaties all refer to substantial ownership and effective control.
That's why Air Berlin would've been shut down quite some time ago.

EU isn't too sticky to its own rules where there's a gain to be made.
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Old 3rd Jul 2016, 12:08
  #90 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Dannyboy39
Going back to the 1980s, prior to the liberalisation of the European aviation market, routes were dictated based on bilateral relations between different states. It allowed the big players, such as British Airways, to rule the roost in the UK airline market. It enabled, due to a lack of competition on key routes, to charge excessively high fares.

When the likes of easyJet and Ryanair started their hyper-aggressive expansions, national carriers became squeezed out on short haul and now struggle to compete and turn a profit.
Not so at all. There is a far greater BA operation nowadays between London (three different airports) and Europe, LCCs, APD, et al notwithstanding.
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Old 3rd Jul 2016, 15:17
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Machrihanish - I agree absolutely. Look at DZ (EasyJet Switzerland). Still owned 51% by Swiss nationals BUT 100% controlled by a UK entity. The Swiss, to this point, have not objected - but they could. Equally any of the MSs where DZ operates could ask the Swiss to confirm ownership and control. Hardball, defiantly, but if they were do so the Swiss could not prove DZ was controlled by Swiss nationals and would be ineligible to operate routes to/from CH.

The EU HASN'T been too sticky to its own rules - agree. But if they were ...
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Old 4th Jul 2016, 10:21
  #92 (permalink)  
 
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From Airline Economics ...

A statement today reads: “easyJet is lobbying the UK government and the EU to ensure the continuation of a fully liberal and deregulated aviation market within the UK and Europe. This would mean that easyJet and all European airlines can continue to operate as they do today.

“As part of easyJet’s contingency planning before the referendum we had informal discussions with a number of European aviation regulators about the establishment of an AOC [air operator certificate] in an European country to enable easyJet to fly across Europe as we do today.

“easyJet has now started a formal process to acquire an AOC.”
Although easyjet also confirmed it will not move from Luton in the UK, it is likely that a new base is on the way at speed and when announced this will cause the share price to rebound further – easyjet shares remain very cheap indeed.
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Old 4th Jul 2016, 14:39
  #93 (permalink)  
 
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this is the tip of the ice berg - I'll bet every company trading in Europe is diverting staff & resources onto this sort of planning with a very high prioirty

has to have an effect on their business
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Old 5th Jul 2016, 20:12
  #94 (permalink)  
 
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Well according to some of the less optimistic financial forecasts on the effect to the UK of Brexit, the country will be an economic basket-case in a few years anyway. So EasyJet may have to rethink their market strategy if no-one here can afford holidays or business trips.

As the country is apparently headed for economic meltdown, why would all those flights to Eastern and Southern Europe be necessary if there are no jobs to come to the UK for? According to some, the days of the UK being a job-magnet are numbered...

Flug
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Old 5th Jul 2016, 20:20
  #95 (permalink)  
 
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According to some, the days of the UK being a job-magnet are numbered...

Wasn't that the scare tactic of UKIP and others. But this is getting away from easyjet as the topic.
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Old 5th Jul 2016, 20:44
  #96 (permalink)  
 
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I'm not taking a position here, I'm just saying that a lot of people are predicting economic disaster for the UK and that would surely have an effect on jobs and travel? So their model may need a rethink if that comes to pass. Down to Easy to gauge how that will affect their routes.

Flug
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Old 5th Jul 2016, 23:21
  #97 (permalink)  
 
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Wherever the UK finishes up economically, the EU will be no better off. The UK is the EU's biggest customer.

Armageddon for UK = Armageddon for the EU!
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Old 5th Jul 2016, 23:55
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Flights and tour bookings from Canada to the U.K are up 11% from last year this time, due to the favorable Dollar/Pound Sterling exchange rate.

Is this a bad thing?..

Canada's dollar is consistently undervalued, so as to encourage trade with the U.S.A., Mexico and Japan..and et al.

Britain! Welcome to the Western Hemisphere unhindered! (NAFTA be damned..) I think we love you! (Jeremey Clarkson excluded..)

A little dose of pre-EU nostalgia:

Last edited by evansb; 6th Jul 2016 at 08:58.
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Old 6th Jul 2016, 10:00
  #99 (permalink)  
 
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If a company you worked for lived on nostalgia wouldn't you unsettled? Business looks to the future and BREXIT has forced change. In light of what has happened read again 'No Man is an Island' - poem by John Donn
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Old 6th Jul 2016, 10:02
  #100 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Sober Lark
If a company you worked for lived on nostalgia wouldn't you unsettled? Business looks to the future and BREXIT has forced change. In light of what has happened read again 'No Man is an Island' - poem by John Donn
Um. John Donne
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