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FAA ppl to EASA conversion

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FAA ppl to EASA conversion

Old 2nd Jan 2018, 14:05
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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When considering the FAA route don't forget to add in the necessary ground instruction time, you will need to show logged and endorsed ground instruction time for FAA. Pre and post flight briefings, and coaching pre-checkride. That will probaby account for 60 hrs at $49. You should also expect to pay 5 or 600 USD for the examiner for the check ride and 120 or so for the written exam.
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Old 4th Jan 2018, 09:21
  #22 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
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I'll be interested to follow this - I wonder if the validation is required if always flying with an instructor...
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Old 4th Jan 2018, 14:39
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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Not required, providing the instructor is in command and you only log P2 (or as we call it Pu/t). In Europe, with a few exceptions that are unlikely to apply in your case, P1 under supervision can only be logged on a successful flight test with an examiner.
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Old 4th Jan 2018, 16:03
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by custardpsc View Post
That will probaby account for 60 hrs at $49.
Who would pay $3000 for PPL ground instruction?! Most schools have group ground classes, or home study for a few hundred.

Yes there are expenses, buy generally speaking for someone who wants a PPL and 100 hours PIC, an FAA PPL is cheaper to get, faster to get, easier to get, includes a night rating, is easier to keep valid and can be used in the UK. I wish someone had told me that...

...I did an EASA PPL
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Old 5th Jan 2018, 08:49
  #25 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
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Thanks, I may do the form anyway though not sure I need to introduce myself to the CAA just yet. I have an FAA medical to do in February so depending where I do that I may wait until then.
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Old 19th Feb 2018, 16:26
  #26 (permalink)  
 
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Maybe I'm being dumb, but section 5 of SRG2142 wants contact details for relevant department and person/s at the FAA for the CAA can contact to verify my application.
For the life of me, I cannot find this info anywhere in my documents.
Is there a generic department for this in the FAA, or are they regional offices?
What have others put here?

Also, SRG 2140 Guidance note 3 states that accompanying documents must include:

"Copy of current FAA licence, logbook pages and FAA medical cert"
Which logbook pages? All or just the last one?

"The original or certified true copies of flying logbooks"
How is this different to the first item?

Typical CAA forms - clunky!!
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Old 19th Feb 2018, 18:02
  #27 (permalink)  
 
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You either send the log book (original) or certified copies, usually certified with special words by a UK Examiner........
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Old 26th Feb 2018, 12:15
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by MrAverage View Post
You can fly G reg on an FAA licence after jumping through some hoops. See ORS Series 4 No: 1228.
However, this may all change by April.
So with the recent announcment regarding conversion to EASA by this coming April, am I correct in thinking, that's it no more deferrals, therefore I won't be legal to fly a G reg. aircraft on my FFA licence ?
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Old 27th Feb 2018, 11:28
  #29 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
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Not seeing a definitive answer to the question.

My experience.

I save an FAA PPL, then 200 hours (now 255), was in the UK late September 2017, went to my local airport to see what was involved in getting to fly one of their PA28's; I own one and have 150 hours on type.

Had to wait for their expert CFI - was told, it's like you dont have a licence, you have to do the whole course, minimum 45 hours of instruction, all the exams etc etc. Didn't sound right to me, still doesnt.

Contrast this with UK PPL going to the US, ok some pre paper work but they will give you a PPL on the basis of the EASA or whatever, any ICAO - guessing there is goibg to be some US retaliation somewhere diwn the line.

On the question - do EASA in US, then get issued an FAA 61.75 based on it, seems the best way to go.
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Old 28th Feb 2018, 07:29
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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Ebbie

Whoever told you that either misunderstood your situation or is just plain wrong. You can get an EASA licence with just some prep for an LPC and a couple of writtens. The form filling usually takes much longer than the flight. The 45 hour full course is only required if you have less than 100 hours total.

Or, you can validate your FAA for occasional or regular use as already discussed.

Or, you could join an N reg group and fly with no formalities.

Alland 2012

None of the above is affected by changes on the 8th of April, but that's not to say EASA won't dream up some more madness in the future. Only Brit microlight pilots and UK National PPLs lose out then..................
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Old 2nd Mar 2018, 09:40
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by MrAverage View Post


None of the above is affected by changes on the 8th of April, but that's not to say EASA won't dream up some more madness in the future. Only Brit microlight pilots and UK National PPLs lose out then..................
Thank you
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Old 16th Jul 2018, 19:37
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Squeegee Longtail View Post
Maybe I'm being dumb, but section 5 of SRG2142 wants contact details for relevant department and person/s at the FAA for the CAA can contact to verify my application.
For the life of me, I cannot find this info anywhere in my documents.
Is there a generic department for this in the FAA, or are they regional offices?
What have others put ?

Typical CAA forms - clunky!!
Iím at the section 5 part in filling out my SRG2142 and baffled ....

Did you find any info on where/what FAA contact details to fill in here ?
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Old 17th Jul 2018, 06:48
  #33 (permalink)  
 
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I've found out recently that FAA licence holders flying N reg aircraft in the UK also have to go through the process. It doesn't just apply to them flying G reg!
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Old 17th Jul 2018, 10:06
  #34 (permalink)  
 
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Why would you want an EASA PPL? Just pay the CAA £45 and they will validate your FAA certificate for life...
rudestuff is online now  
Old 17th Jul 2018, 12:01
  #35 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by rudestuff View Post
Why would you want an EASA PPL? Just pay the CAA £45 and they will validate your FAA certificate for life...
In my case that's all I'm doing, just busy jumping through the hoops with air law exam and go up with an examiner to check my flying ability. Then it's waiting for the CAA & FAA to verify and rubber stamp the paperwork between each other which will probably be the longest delay in the whole process.
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Old 17th Jul 2018, 12:58
  #36 (permalink)  
 
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I missed the comment on my previous post.

Seems to validate what I thought, it just didn't seem right.

That said, they are in the selling services business - I did ask what I had to do - maybe if I'd marched in and boldly said I want to rent your PA28 I would have got a better response.

I wasn't going to do it but for the record - Earls Colne - I'l be back in a couple of months maybe someone will show them this thread😆
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Old 17th Jul 2018, 13:37
  #37 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Ebbie 2003 View Post
I missed the comment on my previous post.

Seems to validate what I thought, it just didn't seem right.

That said, they are in the selling services business - I did ask what I had to do - maybe if I'd marched in and boldly said I want to rent your PA28 I would have got a better response.

I wasn't going to do it but for the record - Earls Colne - I'l be back in a couple of months maybe someone will show them this thread😆
Ebbie I think a few of us FAA ticket holders have met the same response at least once. The first flight school I approuched insisted my FAA cert meant "Jack Sh*t" in the UK and I would have to go through the whole PPL training process again, it wasn't easy to find anyone who knew the correct regulations, and even after phoning the CAA and emailing who I was told to contact within their organisation I never received a reply from them.

Anyway I did find a flight school who did dig up the info and gladly took me on board to go through the procedures, I'm almost there now and in the final stages of form filling....

Strange how my UK buddies go on holiday to the US and simply do a standard rental checkout and are legal to take to the skies, but sadly it's not reciprocated in the UK.
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Old 17th Jul 2018, 19:55
  #38 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by alland2012 View Post
In my case that's all I'm doing, just busy jumping through the hoops with air law exam and go up with an examiner to check my flying ability. Then it's waiting for the CAA & FAA to verify and rubber stamp the paperwork between each other which will probably be the longest delay in the whole process.
All you need to do is show knowledge of air law. That can be an exam OR a chat with an examiner.

There is no requirement to go flying.
rudestuff is online now  
Old 18th Jul 2018, 11:26
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by rudestuff View Post
All you need to do is show knowledge of air law. That can be an exam OR a chat with an examiner.

There is no requirement to go flying.
Sorry I worded it incorrectly. The flying part is to satisfy the standard checkout requirement of the operator in order to rent from them. not a legal requirement for the conversion.
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Old 8th Jan 2019, 19:08
  #40 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by rudestuff View Post
Why would you want an EASA PPL? Just pay the CAA £45 and they will validate your FAA certificate for life...
Update on my personal experience of validating my FAA certificate to exercise my PPL privileges in the U.K.

So I applied with the SRG2140 declaration form at the beginning of October 2018. Today I finally received the email confirming my FAA validation for the U.K. ...all good I thought until I read the whole thing, it’s only valid until the 8th April 2019 or the implementation of the BASA agreement whichever comes first, and suggests I should consider converting my certificate.

I understand this agreement has been in the pipeline for some time and as been deferred for the last couple of years. I couldnt speak to anyone at the CAA today for more information, and can’t find the right answer online.

So can anyone here more knowledgeable than me confirm that the BASA agreement is definitely being implemented by the 8th April 2019 ?
If so it looks like I should just have gone the EASA conversation route from the onset instead of waiting 3 months for the FAA validation which will expire in another 3 months !


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