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CAT II operation in the USA and Europe...

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CAT II operation in the USA and Europe...

Old 6th Feb 2017, 14:41
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CAT II operation in the USA and Europe...

I don't have the info or access at this time for CAT II ops in both the USA and Europe.

I'm just interested in knowing if there are CAT II specific approach restrictions/limitations as far as winds are concerned.

In Canada the TP1490 All Weathers Manual imposes a 15 knot crosswind and a 10 knot tailwind limitation for the runway in use at the "touchdown point" regardless if the aircraft as no such limitations.

Any info or links to CAT II ops in the USA and Europe would be appreciated.
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Old 6th Feb 2017, 16:13
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It would depend on the OpSpec but 15 kts crosswind is standard. I believe 15 kts is the minimum demonstrated crosswind for CAT I & II system certification. The FAA OpSpec is C059:

https://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/...N_8900.234.pdf
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Old 6th Feb 2017, 19:25
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Thanks peekay4.

It seems that in the USA they only have the 15 knot crosswind limitation and do not have a 10 knot tailwind limitation like in Canada.

The 10 knot tailwind limitation is somewhat redundant because most aircrafts have a 10 knot tailwind for landing limitation in their AFMs.

Last edited by Jet Jockey A4; 7th Feb 2017 at 16:37.
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Old 6th Feb 2017, 20:27
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You are talking here about CAT II specifications/certification for the ground based parts, correct?

I would be interested in any references whether there are limits like that in European CAT II specifications.

As our operating manual has crosswind limits a few knots higher for CAT II approaches. I'm fairly sure they would not put that in if it wasn't allowed, but then again...
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Old 6th Feb 2017, 23:03
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Same our Operations manual is 20kts for Xwind CAT2
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Old 7th Feb 2017, 13:36
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USA, Canada, and Australia? as well as probably states that follow Faa rules like Saudi Arabia all have the 15 kt. crosswind limitation.....otherwise we are allowed 25 kts on 777 in our ops specs
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Old 7th Feb 2017, 16:47
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Intrance...


You are talking here about CAT II specifications/certification for the ground based parts, correct?

Correct... I am not talking about aircraft AFM limits (our aircraft has only "demonstrated values") but CAT II crosswind limits imposed by Transport Canada and the FAA due to the ground based equipment, which stipulate a max crosswind of 15 knots at the touchdown point while making a CAT II approach.

I would be interested in any references whether there are limits like that in European CAT II specifications.

Yes I would like to know what are the limits if any in Europe (EASA) for CAT II ops.
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Old 7th Feb 2017, 17:55
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You are talking here about CAT II specifications/certification for the ground based parts, correct?
In my experience in a number of European States, there are no wind (or other met) criteria at which ATC will not clear an aircraft to make an approach - the general principle being that ATC will provide information about the conditions and it's up to the crew to decide what they can do with their aircraft. The only rider I would add is that most airports will specify a minimum VIS/RVR for any take-off or landing, and sometimes manoeuvering on the ground.
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Old 7th Feb 2017, 23:42
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Correct... I am not talking about aircraft AFM limits (our aircraft has only "demonstrated values") but CAT II crosswind limits imposed by Transport Canada and the FAA due to the ground based equipment, which stipulate a max crosswind of 15 knots at the touchdown point while making a CAT II approach.
Jet Jockey, I believe the 15 kts default limit imposed by TC / FAA is not solely based on ground equipment limitations. They may be exceeded if the aircraft can handle stronger winds, if documented in the AFM and/or OpSpec as appropriate.

To certify airborne equipment for CAT I & II, the manufacturers must show that they can meet certain performance standards when there's a crosswind of at least 15 kts, tailwind of 10 kts and headwind of 25 kts -- all measured at the touchdown point and must be repeatable when conducted against several representative ground systems.

These are the minimum values required for certification so they're also the standard value in the OpSpec template. However TC & FAA can certainly approve higher limits if the aircraft / crew / procedures are capable of achieving more.
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