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Flying the MU2 - facts please.

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Flying the MU2 - facts please.

Old 23rd Oct 2011, 02:57
  #101 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
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PPRUNE is the 7th level of hell for aviation posers and wannabes.

There are more people that I have caught on their bullshit here then I care to admit. If you want to keep your sanity, simply don't take what people say seriously here.
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Old 23rd Oct 2011, 06:56
  #102 (permalink)  
 
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Mmmmm. Has SSG returned?
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Old 23rd Oct 2011, 16:49
  #103 (permalink)  

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Thanks for the support Mutt and OK465. Kind of embarrassing, but I do appreciate your posts.

Cheers.

--------------------------------O-----------------------------------------

In my short time with the USMS, I never got less than 800 hours per year.
I averaged over a 1,000 hours a year while I was with the USMS and I was the second higest for a few of those years. To be honest, I cannot remember how many months I flew over a hundred hours.

The funny thing is that with the company I left to go fly for the USMS, I flew less in the one year than I did in the third month with the USMS. With my former company I flew 112 hours the year previous and in the third month with the USMS I flew 118 hours. I think they were trying to kill me.

Here is a list of the aircraft I flew with the USMS; B-727, Sabre 80, Westwind I/II, Sabre 40/60, Lear 25/28, Kingair 200 and a Cessna 310.

The Lear 25/28*, Kingair 200** and the Cessna 310 were seized assets, the Westwinds and the Sabreliners were leased. The 727s we owned along with the Sabre 80s, which were ex-flight inspection aircraft we inherited from the FAA.


* The Lear 28 was returned to the drug dealer it was seized from, after we overhauled the engines, repainted and installed a new interior.

** The Kingair was stolen, yes really stolen, from us when it was parked at a small airport in Miami, Florida. The CIA finally found it a couple of years later in Colombia. They asked if we wanted it back, we replied not only no, but hell no. I was very happy that we did not want it back, as I most likely would have been the poor guy that would have been sent down there to bring it back.


Okay, I must be getting old and forgetful. I forgot the damn 731 JetStar. It was serial number three. Started life as a -6, then was converted to a -8, the only -6 that was I think, then into a 731 when the FAA owned it. We got it from the FAA and it was a maintenance nightmare. I never finished anything longer than a one day mission with that aircraft. If it was a standard four or five day mission, it wasn't a question if it would breakdown, but where. I had two rapid de-compressions in 48 hour time period in that aircraft. First one was early Tuesday morning, returned to a maintenance base, it was fixed and then Thursday night had the second. Two different causes. The Attorney General of the United States was on board with the second rapid de-compression. He was not amused.

Last edited by con-pilot; 24th Oct 2011 at 20:20.
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Old 5th Nov 2011, 01:11
  #104 (permalink)  
 
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I don't think that your post is a useful contribution - JT
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Old 5th Nov 2011, 03:11
  #105 (permalink)  
 
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Dmark1 -

Thank You.
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Old 5th Nov 2011, 04:28
  #106 (permalink)  
 
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SSG=kanetoads=dmark1

You've pulled that one before SSG, posting under different aliases and agreeing with yourself.
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Old 5th Nov 2011, 06:32
  #107 (permalink)  
 
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I can assure you Mark is not me...maybe the word is getting out...others are catching on....have you figured out why the blades turn left or right yet?
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Old 5th Nov 2011, 11:50
  #108 (permalink)  
 
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Warning - thread drift

have you figured out why the blades turn left or right yet
Your sciolistic post in the relevant thread was

The advancing blade on the main rotor creates more lift then the retreating blade in forward flight. The pilot sits on the side of the advancing blade to counteract the roll tendancy at higher speeds.
I'm sure the plank drivers reading your statement will not take long to educate themselves on helo aerodynamics, and drop to the floor convulsing in mirth, as did the helo pilots.

For your information con-pilot is a highly experienced aviator, as a little research on your part would soon prove. His opinion is highly regarded by legitimate members, your personal diatribe against him is misplaced, but it's what we've come to expect from you.
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Old 5th Nov 2011, 12:29
  #109 (permalink)  
 
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such threads seem always to drift, in fact at an anonymus forum like here you can claim yourself to be neil armstrong and nobody can prove for sure you are or you are not.

you can have multiple accounts so one nick can confirm the "realness" of another nick being one person...

well- aviation has many fans !

i have wrote earlier that i personally know very few +20000 hours pilots, none of them would spend hours for hours in a public anonymous forum and i know nobody with such a variety of aircraft flown .

simply because the market works not that way when you think about it. scoring that amount of hours means flying at an airline for decades. that also means that you are fixed to one or very few types of aircraft and do there your everyday business. so no way or time to switch between that amount of pistons, turboprops, GA jets, airliner jets etc etc.

but nevertheless its a great forum !
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Old 5th Nov 2011, 14:27
  #110 (permalink)  
 
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so no way or time to switch between that amount of pistons, turboprops, GA jets, airliner jets etc etc.
20,000 hours for a professional aviator can be had without even trying hard aerobat. The highest time gal, Evelyn Johnson, gave it up after 57,635.4 hours, Max Conrad had 52,929, and the record holder, Ed Long passed away with in excess of 65,000.

i personally know very few +20000 hours pilots, none of them would spend hours for hours in a public anonymous forum
I can confirm there are posters here with 20,000, and not all of them are anonymous. They just don't have a life.
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Old 5th Nov 2011, 16:49
  #111 (permalink)  

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Possibly some of the more aggressive, confrontational posters have traveled on USMS aircraft??
One may have a point.

Personally, I'm not even going to reply to the idiot/s.






Actually I think 'calling one out' on an anonymous website quite amusing.
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Old 5th Nov 2011, 19:25
  #112 (permalink)  
 
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"20,000 hours for a professional aviator can be had without even trying hard"

brian, i currently fly general aviation and we do about 400 hours a year airborne time. the rest is not free- they put you often in standby, real offtime is sometimes limited to minimum required - but its not flying hours.

previously i worked for an airline in scheduled operation and we scored in aviation boom times up to 800 hours a year , mostly in short and medium range missions and multiple legs. with the turnaround ground time between the legs , which in short legs was not much shorter than the flight by itself and the briefing before and paperwork after the day you had 11hours on duty which resulted in about 5 hours airborne time. to make 800-900 hours in a year you did this schedule ever day with rest at minimum what the law dictates.

i can really tell you that 900 hours in a year airborne time results in very little private life and everybody earning his money with flying an airplane for a company can confirm this.

beyond that many of the aircrafts mentioned as real experience here require a type rating, so for the training and rechecks of all this different types the day must really have more than 24 hours it seems.

but ok... so what ? we have here the honour to talk in this thread with aviators which in regards to total flying time and amount of aircraft flown clearly outperforms pilots like sullenberger or the polish 767 wheel up landing captain wrona ?

a google search says sullenberger had massive 19000hours scored in 30 years !!! at US airways and as a former military pilot he had a total of 40 years pilot time- which results in an average of 475 hours / year over his career. due to the fact that after military service he joined instantly airline operations he has of course no experience on lear jets, mu2, king airs etc.

wrona has 20 years 767 experience, and over 30 years total flying time resulting in impressive 13000 hours or an average of 433 hours/ year over his entire career. he of course joining LOT early also cannot say anything about learjets , kingairs and other ga aircraft since he like said spend his last 20 years to fly just one aircraft type ( 767) .

and i assume neither sullenberger nor wrona spends countless hours infront a computer writng thousands of postings in an open aviation forum.

think a minute about it brian...
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Old 5th Nov 2011, 22:59
  #113 (permalink)  
 
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Over the past few years the PPRuNe safe harbor has been surreptitiously invaded by an unwelcome influx of malodorous flotsam. While there have always been a few odd ducks and bullheaded barnacles among us, this relatively recent tide has carried with it some real stinkers that have befouled our communal waters.

What is a besieged community to do? Weigh anchor, fan out, and sail into singular oblivion? Pray to King Neptune for a cleansing typhoon? Woe is us...

Wait, I think I may have a solution! A humble request of our wise and benevolent PPRuNe harbormaster to dredge out a new cove (in a predominantly windward location we beseech thee) and thereupon these sunny new waters laden with many fine and sturdy berths we can thusly endeavor to establish a private, members-only club in the classic tradition.*

Founding members should be limited to a group of those PPRuNers of mandatory minimum PPRuNe vintage. For added vessel variety and dockside spice, newer, charter member-sponsored candidates will be granted probationary access to be followed by rigorous review for possible semi-permanent inclusion.

*Classic Tradition: We shall not discriminate against race, color, religious creed, socio-economic standing, or questionable political affiliations, however we do reserve the right to refuse any new member showing signs of limited wit (of the humorous variety - rare bona fide boffins excepted), persons overly-sensitive to ridicule, those with a predisposition towards humorless rabble-rousing, and of course, any person or persons from the government claiming to be here to help.

Now on to the important stuff - what design shall we adopt for our fore pole burgees, finely embroidered pocket crests and drink-chip faces? Will the boiling of sprouts be permitted in the clubhouse galley? In which direction should the bagpiper face during the evening blow?
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Old 6th Nov 2011, 00:20
  #114 (permalink)  
 
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Aerobat77

Con-pilot and I, among many others here have spent more time between the OM and the TDZ than you have airborne.

I work with two guys who have a completely authenticated 20,000 + hours; I know pipeline and check hauling pilots who have been logging 30+ hours a week since Carter was president. I flew 900+ hours a years for six years and know its not easy, but that is routine. The USMS is known throughout the USG for high flight hours; I flew a 1,000+ during Desert Storm and have guys knocking out 800 or more in the last ten years in C-5s. A pilot in my squadron finished his career with 13,000 hours of AF time, which is strictly take-off to touchdown, not block-to-block. There are literally thousands of pilots in the US who fly 800-1,000 hard hours a year.

GF
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Old 6th Nov 2011, 01:13
  #115 (permalink)  
 
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Loved it vapilot

spends countless hours infront a computer writng thousands of postings in an open aviation forum
You obviously missed the pleasure (though not everyone agreed) reading the posts of our recently departed 411A. Had an airline career spanning DC-7, Constellation, and passed away recently still captaining a wide body. A prolific poster, do a search for the number.
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Old 6th Nov 2011, 20:19
  #116 (permalink)  
 
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Also for those that spend a lot of time in hotels, a few minutes here and there posting on the internet is really nothing in terms of time.
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Old 9th Nov 2011, 10:12
  #117 (permalink)  
 
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Wow, I just read a years worth of posts by "20,000+" hour pilots and it made me dumber.
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Old 9th Nov 2011, 14:19
  #118 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
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Junk flyer

At the 8th day of sitting in a hotel in a Gulf state during Ramadan, having rearranged the computer files for the third time, waiting for the bar to reopen on Thursday, posting on PPRuNe is a marked relief. OTOH, four days in Palau not having Internet, getting back is also a pleasure. Only so much Pacific paradise.

GF
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Old 9th Nov 2011, 20:31
  #119 (permalink)  
 
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Getting back to the topic.

About the solitair. Some questions.

What are they like landing in crosswind, from what I can gather, they only have a 15 kt x wind limit.

One website lists the max cruise alt as FL330. Do they regularly go that high or more comming in the high 20's. Is there any benefit going above FL330.
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Old 9th Nov 2011, 23:17
  #120 (permalink)  
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Wait, I think I may have a solution!

A vexed question, I fear.

(a) if we were to eliminate those whom we might think to be inferior, the forum would become unashamedly elitist.

Would that be a useful end ?

(b) if we turned our backs (hypothetically, as the owners would not permit that to occur) anarchy would ensue.

Definitely not useful.

(c) what we endeavour to do is

(i) keep the absolute ratbags at bay, having given them time to demonstrate their extremism

(ii) keep overt nastiness at bay, per the generic Rules of Engagement

(iii) try to keep threads on a reasonably even keel without exercising moderator bias or being precious

Do we succeed ? Not too sure. But that's about as good as we can do, I guess.

Safe aviating.
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