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Airbus A320 crashed in Southern France

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Airbus A320 crashed in Southern France

Old 24th Mar 2015, 23:46
  #361 (permalink)  
 
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ACMS
The fact that not one word was said for 8 mins of high speed descent
Not quite true they may have transmitted, in that area at that altitude they would have been talking with an en-route freq, maybe Swiss or Bordeaux, if they had to descend quickly then once below approx. 20000" radio contact on that freq would have been lost.
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Old 24th Mar 2015, 23:48
  #362 (permalink)  
 
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Really, ever heard of 121.5 not only that there would be a lot of other Aircraft on the same frequency that would hear and respond if required.

All Airbus crew are very very familiar with the proceedure to switch of 2 ADR's if the AOA problem occurs. They would have achieved this very quickly and regained control quickly, also the weather was ok and they climbed normally to FL380. So I can safely tell you that icing on a AOA probe WAS NOT THE CAUSE.
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Old 24th Mar 2015, 23:53
  #363 (permalink)  
 
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6 major cruise "events" including crashes in the last 13 months--not counting bombs or shoot downs?

you've got my attention.


.....7 events initiated during cruise (including one A/C shot down)
9 events initiated during T/O, Climb, Approach or Landing......acc to AZR......
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Old 24th Mar 2015, 23:55
  #364 (permalink)  
 
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The unthinkable

That's the scenario that would better fit the known sequence of events. But it is unthinkable.
Or is it?

Last edited by marie paire; 26th Mar 2015 at 18:48.
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Old 25th Mar 2015, 00:01
  #365 (permalink)  
 
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The FPL published by Heathrowairport is consistent with the track on FR24.
It is interesting to observe the track on FR24 when the aircraft reaches the French coast. At that time the traffic is not important and I believe that the ATC gave a direct course as a shortcut. A classical way of control. The plane was on the UN870 between ROTIS and MAXIR at 380 and has likely received a direct course to OKTET or IRMAR (44.80 6.79 ). This is the latest waypoint of the French FIR. The direct course is a 25 degree course. If you draw a line from the position where the aircraft initiated a left turn you can easily see that. This track is exactly the one that brought the aircraft to the crash site. Shortly after initiating this left turn the aircraft started to descent but kept its initial heading until the end of the flight.
Squawk, I may be reading these numbers wrong, but from the data posted today: http://www.zerohedge.com/sites/defau...%20descent.jpg, it looks to me as if the plane changed heading from roughly 25 degrees to roughly 43, almost as soon as it reached FL380. As in, it turned right.

Am I interpreting these numbers wrongly?
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Old 25th Mar 2015, 00:06
  #366 (permalink)  
 
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The type I fly with ADM automatically turns the aircraft 90 degs left during an ADM not continuing in a straight line, in fact it does this.

The aircraft turns 90° left
Auto Throttle will auto-engage if required and reduce thrust to IDLE
Descend at a speed of 10 kts. less than Vmo/Mmo
15,000 ft. is placed in altitude preselect
“ADM” is annunciated in the center of the FMA panel
Upon reaching 15,000 ft., the aircraft maintains 250 kts.
ADM remains active until autopilot is disengaged
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Old 25th Mar 2015, 00:06
  #367 (permalink)  
 
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I heard this reported on the main news programme (Tagesschau)
Copied that. Spiegel just had it first, I think. Yeah, and when journalists don't know any background... it's their job to say something, so they say / write / blurb.... "something"...

As well the coverage about some computer mishap of an A321 last year which was reported to have been recovered just seconds from desaster last year.... actually they had several MINUTES to go and stopped the event while still being above 20'000 feet.

The more you know about real facts in this business and compare it with the mainstream media - the more you mistrust the media. Happened to me.
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Old 25th Mar 2015, 00:06
  #368 (permalink)  
 
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similar to AF447?

Iced pitot tubes and similarity to AF447: that happened in the dark and bad weather, with suspicion of disorientation and those on flight deck not sure of AoA or AoD with respect to mother earth. This has happened in broad daylight, good weather and a nice range of mountains in clear view from the cockpit window. I can't believe that icing or incorrect pitot readings etc brought about the sad end of this flight
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Old 25th Mar 2015, 00:08
  #369 (permalink)  
 
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The USA news stations are reporting that the CVR was recovered. Others report the FDR recovered. Anyone know which is correct?
Thanks
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Old 25th Mar 2015, 00:09
  #370 (permalink)  
 
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Kalitta had a near hit with a 747 a good few years back.

It was a Lear. If it's "Kalitta" it's 135. "Connie" is the 121 operation.
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Old 25th Mar 2015, 00:12
  #371 (permalink)  
 
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Squawk, I may be reading these numbers wrong, but from the data posted today: http://www.zerohedge.com/sites/defau...%20descent.jpg, it looks to me as if the plane changed heading from roughly 25 degrees to roughly 43, almost as soon as it reached FL380. As in, it turned right.

Am I interpreting these numbers wrongly?
Although, now that I study the FR24 playback, it does suggest 42 degrees followed by 26. The numbers apparently came from planefinder.net. Can't both be right, can they?
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Old 25th Mar 2015, 00:14
  #372 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Old Haltonian View Post
Looking at this VIDEO it seems more difficult to access the crew 02 masks than I was expecting, if crew only have seconds before blacking out at 38k - 40k ft might not be too good?
They're are designed to be donned with the one hand and it barely takes two seconds to put on if you're not wearing sun glasses. Removal of sunglasses first may add an extra second.
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Old 25th Mar 2015, 00:15
  #373 (permalink)  
 
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If the data provided here is accurate, it suggests the aircraft was under manual control. The V/S and A/S fluctuations are not consistent with George's typical finesse.

Why no voice comms? If the quick don O2 masks were required, it could be the crew missed switching on the mikes - so while they may have been keying there would have been little or no voice transmitted, since their hot boom mikes would be hanging about or on the floor.
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Old 25th Mar 2015, 00:16
  #374 (permalink)  
 
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Crew refusing to fly

What is the significance of some crew not flying on later flights?
This, to me, sounds completely abnormal and against protocol...am I wrong?
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Old 25th Mar 2015, 00:17
  #375 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by MarkerInbound
It was a Lear. If it's "Kalitta" it's 135. "Connie" is the 121 operation.
Kalitta Air is an FAR 121 Air Carrier and a leading provider of air cargo transportation, offering both scheduled and chartered transportation services worldwide. The company’s 22 Boeing 747 freighters have been used to transport cargo ranging from delicate medical equipment to heavy machinery to livestock to U.S. mail.
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Old 25th Mar 2015, 00:19
  #376 (permalink)  
 
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What seems undisputed:
  1. Aircraft stayed roughly on the same track until impact
  2. Small impact footprint containing all of the aircraft = no in-flight breakup
  3. FL 380 until impact about 8 minutes
  4. No distress call or ATC 7700 from the flight crew
If the AP was not on, there would very probably have been noticeable heading and speed changes during the descent.
If the AP was ON, the aircraft was in NORMAL LAW.
I think that no crew contact is the most disturbing question.
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Old 25th Mar 2015, 00:20
  #377 (permalink)  
 
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some crew not flying on later flights?
If you would mind to read a bit before... I already answered this with emotions. It's humans. To fly with an absent mind is a serious safety risk.
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Old 25th Mar 2015, 00:21
  #378 (permalink)  

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If the quick don O2 masks were required, it could be the crew missed switching on the mikes - so while they may have been keying there would have been little or no voice transmitted, since their hot boom mikes would be hanging about or on the floor.
Your profile alleges you are an ATPL holder rated on the B737. In which case your speculation is odd in that you clearly have no idea how the oxygen mask microphone is activated.
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Old 25th Mar 2015, 00:21
  #379 (permalink)  
 
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If the quick don O2 masks were required, it could be the crew missed switching on the mikes
Er, no....

The quick donning masks have an integral microphone that is 'switched on' automatically when the mask is removed from the storage box.
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Old 25th Mar 2015, 00:24
  #380 (permalink)  
 
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DMBA

All crew must be fit to fly to operate. They are obliged to ensure they are safe. If the are under emotion stress then the must call 'unfit' or similar. This is very different from 'refusing to fly' on a plane just because another example of the type has crashed. Some airlines may disallow crew from refusing to fly and details of this will be in their disaster handling procedures however crew calling unfit is completely different.
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