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What are the job prospects for new CPLs? (MERGED)

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What are the job prospects for new CPLs? (MERGED)

Old 2nd Jul 2006, 22:22
  #41 (permalink)  

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I had already made the comment about insurance requirements and I did say - all other things being equal. I am not doubting your experience but, guessing you come from a military background, things are a little different when operators are looking to recruit civilians.

And surely instructing IS commercial work; it may not be public transport but it IS commercial.

So, can you explain why, with hours,ratings and experience being equal, that an operator would prefer a 27 year old to a 37 year old? They can't seriously imagine that they would get either of them "for life" as an employee!

Cheers

Whirls
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Old 2nd Jul 2006, 23:14
  #42 (permalink)  

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..and the answer is/ maybe

They would probably offer a lower salary.

This is how it works in every industry ...
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Old 2nd Jul 2006, 23:20
  #43 (permalink)  

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A fair point H-R!

Cheers

Whirls
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Old 3rd Jul 2006, 07:38
  #44 (permalink)  
 
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Wink

My advice is to use your money to start a bussiness (IT is your expertise) work hard for a few years, and when the money is coming in, complete a PPL and fly for fun. You could even invest into a Helicopter company latter on, then you will get a tax break on your CPL training, and get to do some flying.
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Old 3rd Jul 2006, 08:20
  #45 (permalink)  
 
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Bigmike - the wisest advice I have ever heard on Pprune...

That's the way I did it!

Professional heli flying isn't an easy profession to get into it takes money, money and more money.....
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Old 3rd Jul 2006, 08:37
  #46 (permalink)  
 
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My route was PPL(A), PPL(H) some 9 years later, CPL(H) in 2002/2003 (don't remember which!) and will be doing the instructor's course this year. My IT job paid up to the CPL(H) and the flying work covered costs over the two years (base/line/LPC etc.)

Whatever route you take, make sure you get in an environment where you're allowed a little bit of rope but are properly monitored as you progress, and maintain your integrity. If not, it can get very expensive and smelly very quickly if you cover something up (not me, I hasten to add) or get in a situation where your experience is overwhelmed by conditions.
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Old 3rd Jul 2006, 14:58
  #47 (permalink)  
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whirlygig

Whirlygig.
I did not make the the difference between commercial flying and instructing, read up a few threads to whirlybird, Quote "I'm now getting the impression I might get some commercial flying if I got more ratings, but I'll hit 60 in not that many years, so I'm not sure if it's worth the outlay, or even if I want to"

No, you guessed wrong again, I am not ex military pilot, and you can count on one hand how many civilian cpl(h)'s were in the UK when I started.

RJC is starting out at 37,by the time he gets the experience to be employable as a, for arguements sake, a charter pilot,free lance pilot, police/ems pilot etc, etc he will be way past 37.

Big mike, has hit the nail on the head for RJC's situation,IN MY OPINION.
No I can't explain why operators would prefer 27 over 37, but over the years I have seen a great many 20 something year old low time cv's go into file 13 next to a chief pilots desk.

If someone like RJC is going to invest his hard earned money in our industry, and asks for advice he needs to see the pitfalls before he makes the leap.

Whirlygig, sounds like I hit a nerve, on the instructor comment, was not intentional, but begs me to ask the question, what experience, other than instructing do you have to advise RJC?

Just an observation, not a dig.

RJC, I sincerley hope you make it despite the hurdles stacked against you,
good luck.
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Old 3rd Jul 2006, 15:28
  #48 (permalink)  

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Lup, if you'd care to read my profile you will see that there is no raw nerve to hit. I have a PPL and I do not have an instructor's rating.

However, it's just that your advice seems to contradict what so many others have said (over the years) on here with respect to age vs employability. I was curious as to why when it doesn't seem to have been a factor in many other people's choice of career switch.

Cheers

Whirls
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Old 3rd Jul 2006, 16:30
  #49 (permalink)  
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whirlygig,I have been too busy flying over the years to post and stay ahead of PPRUNE, and that as I said before includes overseas were I am away from the coffee tents of Ascot etc, better than PPRUNE sometimes.

But I can say that I can't recall meeting any pilot either flying the same roster or around the bizars in the UK who started their career close to 40.

There must be some as I have just spoken to a USA pilot friend of mine, who has met a few out there, mainly flying low paid traffic jobs due to their experience,but the market in the US is much different to the UK.

When I flew out there, the young starters were all going through to instructor level to gain hours to move on to better conditions.
They were paid peanuts and had to buy maps and manuals from the school who employed them.

Maybe the industry will wake up soon, when all the experienced guys start hanging up their flying gloves and discover the huge gap between what experience is left and the low timers waiting for a break.

If or when that happens, I won't be giving RJC the same advise.
By the way don't use a rumour forum to to mould your views on aviation.
RJC did say he had a partner in tow, he will have to take into account Aviation Induced Divorce Syndrome, before he starts spending his money.
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Old 3rd Jul 2006, 18:56
  #50 (permalink)  
 
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RJC

1. DO you have access to 60k, (including remotgaging your house if neccessary)

2. Do you have the will to go all the way, despite what everyone else says, friends, family and PPruners

3. Are you prepared to work F***ing hard to achieve it, including uprooting from where you live

Answer a definate yes to all 3 and you'll do fine.

18th Aug 2004 I took my first PPL lesson, now I am CPL/FI with approaching 600 hours and am delighted with my decision. By the way I'm 38.

So get off your ass and decide what you want to do, whatever it is if you want it badly enough you will achieve it, if you don't you'll just be wasting your money.

Good Luck
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Old 3rd Jul 2006, 20:30
  #51 (permalink)  
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jemax

jemax,

Good questions and very true, and glad you came out the other end with the will to go on, great stuff.

however RJC's original question Quote "What happens next? Would anyone employ me? Consider training me, type conversion etc to small turbine etc? If I signed up with a company for x years, would that help?

I would not be looking to work off-shore, just on shore commercial work. Charter type of stuff I guess.

No mention of flight instructor there, "onshore commercial work charter type"
You may be RJC two years down the line, so the best to answer his direct question.

How much onshore charter have you done, and how many applications so far?, it does not get any more real than you.
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Old 3rd Jul 2006, 21:14
  #52 (permalink)  
 
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Fair point,

Guess it has been about 100 hours onshore commercial/charter the rest instructing, but it's making a resonable living, and I hope it gets better from here as my experience grows.

I'm still very much wet behind the ears, but my point is you'll find a million people who'll just say it's a stupid idea, including my mum! But unless you have access to the resources and really commit it's immaterial cos you won't get through and succeed anyway.

Beats my old PLC desk job every day of the week
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Old 3rd Jul 2006, 21:41
  #53 (permalink)  

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lup,

In his third post, in response to my post, RJC said
So, planning ahead a few years - perhaps an FI rating is a way to earn enough to live on and simply enjoy myself in the process. Or get a lucky break at some point in the future. Whirlybird, yes, what you say does make sense to me. Enjoying a job can easily take priority over what you paid for it.
Under the circumstances, it was perfectly reasonable for Whirlygig and I to assume that RJC was considering instructing...along with everything else you can do with a CPL(H). That is why I pointed out that one can follow that route at virtually any age. It was totally relevant to the conversation which was taking place.

I'll never quite understand why people read the first post and appear to skip all the rest, when a thread has already gone to two pages.
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Old 4th Jul 2006, 00:33
  #54 (permalink)  
 
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60,000 GBP (my computer doesnt have a pound symbol)

I keep seeing the 60K (GBP) figure mentioned and cant help but wonder why somebody would spend that much on a helicopter licence.

If you were to travel to New Zealand or Australia that amount of money would buy approx 450 - 370 hrs respectively.

New Zealand requires 150 hrs for CPL H which can be reduced by up to 50 hrs (1 hr for every 2 hrs PIC Aeroplane within the previous 12 months). $65000 = 21,385 Pound

Australia requires 105 hrs for CPL H which can be reduced to 70 hrs (yes seventy) if the combined fixed wing course is taken. $50,000A = 20,145 Pound

Find out whats involved in converting back to a British licence. You may be able to do the majority of your hours somewhere else and sit your licence in England.

Worth thinking about.
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Old 4th Jul 2006, 03:42
  #55 (permalink)  
 
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I think the figure of GBP 60k usually includes the cost of an IR, which is the foot in the door, although no guarantee, to the North Sea co pilot positions. The paper trail of converting an Australian/NZ CPL(H) to JAA is a long and expensive one.
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Old 4th Jul 2006, 08:49
  #56 (permalink)  
 
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tomstheword / pohm1,

£60k is the approximate cost of CPL(H) + FI rating
£70k is the approximate cost of CPL (H) + IR

in my opinion having instructed, done VFR charter/aerial work and North Sea, I would get an FI rating before you try and get an IR, because at least you will able to keep flying as an instructor, build your hours and work towards being employable for VFR charter/aerial work and hopefully get an IR down the line.

if you get a CPL(H) + IR, you are ony realistically employable by 3 companys Bond/Bristow/CHC and if they are not recruiting or if you fail selection, you are not really employable as a commercial pilot and you have no FI rating to get some experience either.

if you want to cover all the options and get a CPL(H) + FI rating + IR, that is going to cost approx £90k and its starting to sound a little expensive, but you would be in a better position. I would not reccomend this though it is just far too much to much to spend in my opinion on your career.

also what people never seem to mention is that an IR in a helicopter is the hardest thing you will ever do and big tough men have been known to suffer a lot of stress, and people do fail it, even if though they have spent £30k extra on it.

to answer the original question what happens after getting a CPL(H), the answer in many cases is "nothing", unless you have worked out what you are doing next.

if anyone is reckless enough to do a basic CPL only with no provision after that, they will surely be disapointed and have a big row with wife/ husband about how they have wasted all the savings / remortgage and possibly moved into the spare room

regards

CF

Last edited by Camp Freddie; 4th Jul 2006 at 08:59.
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Old 4th Jul 2006, 10:01
  #57 (permalink)  
 
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I did my CPL around the same time as Jemax, however I'm based in Ireland and the scene is a little different. I can't answer yes to one of his three criteria - are you willing to move anywhere for a job. However, I have a non flying job that lets me fly part time, and I'm not going to give that up any time soon.
On the IR, I went to a well known FI and IR training school to discuss options, and they discouraged me from doing the IR at this point. (245 hours). 1. Because with my eperience level I would struggle to pass it in the twin, and 2. without a job to go in to, or at least an offer of a job, it's no use. No one except the north sea operators is going to take on a low hour CPL with a basic IR and no IR experience. They also said that it's downright dangerous if the low houred IR pilot does not go into a structured environment to build on the initial training. So I've decided not to go that route at present. I also agree on the comments about the difficulty, this has been emphasised to me many times.
The way to go seems to be FI, but with a school you can build a relationship with that will also progress you in other ways. It's about personality and being in the right place at the right time to take advantage of an opportunity. It does happen.
Edited to say: By build a relationship I mean, possibly employ you as FI afterwards, give you a deal on training and type ratings, possibly positioning work etc.
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Old 5th Jul 2006, 07:33
  #58 (permalink)  
 
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RJC. This is my two pence worth for you...

At 36 I was going through a mid life crisis, like you, I really wanted to fly for a living. Spent 17 yrs working in London, and wanted a change.

I sold my house, car, motobike, parachute, dog, everything. Moved to the US and worked in PA. I obtained all my qualifications up to CFI. I was very lucky to be able to secure my work visa, then green card to follow. I taught for over 2 yrs, then moved to company in the GOM. Now fly tours in Alaska for the summer, not quite sure what to do after though

Wouldn't mind working back in the UK to be nearer my family.

I have heard rumours that a larger GOM company may be sponsering visa's due to the lack of pilots around. If that would be the case, you my consider moving to the US, perhaps on a J1 before they take it away, then apply to this company once you are a CFI with 1000hrs. Or at least speak to them about the visa's before you come.
Just my quick thought on the subject

Good luck with whatever you choose
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Old 5th Jul 2006, 11:25
  #59 (permalink)  

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Post CPL-H issue

RJC

I would certainly have done all my research into the various flying establishments, before i started to put 40k+ into getting an CPL-H. I would also advise to only do a normal CPL instead of as frozen ATPL-H, because if you havent got the IR component within 3 years of passing the exams you lose the entitlement and have to resit the 8 or 9 exams, and for what.

Doing an IR before you have a minimum of 500 hours is IMHO a waste of time unless you know someone in any one of the North Sea Companies. There is alot to be said for where you do your training, because certain operators prefer their students to have gone to certain institutions.

Whilst you are going through your CPL-H training, you should probably go modular. This equals potentailly more hours after training and the ability for you to work in IT and train at your own pace, making contacts and getting pally with your flight school. If your flying school is small enough and does some commercial work, you should enquire whilst you are doing your PPL-H and Commercial theory exams to work as ground crew for these companies. This will give you an insight to ramp work.

If the operations dude likes you and you get repeat work, you may get the opportunity to get some supervised ops work when you have qualified. NEVER bite the hand that feeds you and try not to burn any bridges on your tempestous route into helicopter aviation, as this is a very small world and a rumour is all it takes to mess up your career. So from the moment you have your JAR Class1 Medical in your hands, start creating the contacts and speak to people. Be open and welcoming and definately not demanding. Look at what you can give to your future employer and not what your future employer can give you (Type ratings on his bill and not yours etc).

Take skills with you to your future employer. Getting an ADR cert for tanks wouldnt be a bad idea. Some sort of ground handling experience and ops experience is a start. The rest will happen if carefully planned.

MD
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Old 5th Jul 2006, 14:19
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While we're on the topic of IRs, will the off-shore companies (who appear to be the only folks who ALWAYS require an IR) accept a single-engine IR (i.e. one done in Grandpa Jetranger), or do you have to have a twin IR to be treated as 'having an IR'?

I guess what I asking is considering you need a twin IR to fly offshore, would a company be happy to cover your conversion from single IR to twin IR, or is that a big no-no?
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