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Modular V Integrated (Merged) - Look here before starting a new thread!

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Modular V Integrated (Merged) - Look here before starting a new thread!

Old 11th Aug 2021, 09:43
  #1001 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Bristol
Posts: 3
Thumbs up Structured modular and issues since Brexit

Hi all,

I'm putting together a plan to begin the journey to gain my frozen ATPL and having rad many comments I believe a structured modular route would be more beneficial than going integrated, not solely from a financial perspective but also from a licensing and speed perspective as i've heard horror stories of huge delays waiting to complete flying hours, and issues with licensing being held up/exams lost etc.

My question is, as a British citizen (sadly) and since Brexit would anyone be able to recommend/ suggest a smart route for gaining my PPL, IR/NR and hour building abroad, and any issues that I might encounter with licensing conversions back to UK. I'm wanting to gain an EASA license, not CAA, but I know some licensing states can be tricky.

I'm considering either USA, Spain or Greece due to predictable weather and speed gaining flying hours. I'd also look to complete my ATPL theory at a similar time, then I have a school in mind to complete the final licenses (CPL, APS-MCC etc) as a package deal.

Lots of schools i've spoken with seem to offer modular routes but as they also offer integrated whenever I speak with them they try and put me off straight away and lead me on to the modular route. I'm worried if I persist with them they'll purposefully give me second hand training out of spite. Maybe just being a bit sceptical?

Thanks in advance - hugely appreciate any advice you can give me.
j34allen is offline  
Old 11th Aug 2021, 11:06
  #1002 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Wherever I lay my hat
Posts: 3,145
Do you even know why you want an EASA licence?

Wanting both I can understand, but wanting EASA only doesn't make much sense, unless you have dual nationality?

If you want to waste a lot of money, go integrated.

If you want to work at your own pace and hold down a job, go modular

If you want to get the most hours and spend the least money - go to the US for 2 years.
rudestuff is offline  
Old 11th Aug 2021, 18:36
  #1003 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Bristol
Posts: 3
Thanks Rudestuff, appreciate the response.

So I might be slightly naive but going by the advice i'v been given my UK as well as EU based ATO's I was under the impression an EASA license would be superior and is accepted more widely than the CAA since Brexit? I didn't think a visa would be the most important thing to consider as I assume if a job offer is made by a foreign based company then you can apply for a working visa in that country and have sponsorship? I.e. if I was to apply for work with Ryanair, and I was offered a job flying say based in Palma, the visa would be a secondary consideration as i'm not necessarily moving to a location before applying for a positiion? If i've misunderstood this then clearly I need to read up further on my options.

Most of the EU based ATO's I speak with train a mix of cadets with may from the UK and still following an EASA license route purely as training is cheaper, faster and accessible.

I'd be keen to learn more about what my options are and what i've perhaps misinterpreted if that's the case?
j34allen is offline  
Old 11th Aug 2021, 21:41
  #1004 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Wherever I lay my hat
Posts: 3,145
The right to live and work is equally as important at a professional licence, both are a basic requirement. In the short term there will be little to no chance of a UK pilot being sponsored for a work visa in Europe: there a simple too many unemployed European pilots.

As for career advice, you'll get plenty on here. But it really would help to know as much about you as possible, otherwise a lot of assumptions have to be made.
If you're reasonably smart, just inherited 50k and can go anywhere in the world at the drop of a hat - great.
If you're married with kids and can't go more than 20 miles from Stockport once a week and you've got no money, well that's a different kettle of fish.
Put simply, if you're prepared to put 'the dream' ahead of all else, smoking/drinking/relationships - then becoming a pilot is quite straightforward.
rudestuff is offline  
Old 12th Aug 2021, 18:19
  #1005 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Bristol
Posts: 3
Thumbs up

Hi Rudestuff.

So I would say I am absolutely in the former camp. My situation is in early 30's, saved enough to cover most costs, have zero dependants (partner or kids), educated to degree level so would hope with hard study and focus I'd be capable of passing ATPL's, and I'm not only available too, but also keen to study abroad so I am in a very flexible position.

I suppose the tricky part is that as i'm fortunate enough to have a number of options i'm finding it quite difficult to decide on the best route and not waste this very privileged opportunity.

I've flown 5 hours in a mix of small aircraft and I know it's something I want to commit to for the long run, but i'm conscious that i'm no spring chicken, so I suppose the most important thing for me is finding the most suitable route to give me the best chance of landing a job asap after graduating. Ideally i'd like NOT to stay in the UK and would be keen to take a job in just about any country/ airline that would have me. Hope that sheds some light on my concerns and personal situation.
j34allen is offline  
Old 20th Aug 2021, 20:47
  #1006 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Location: Leicester
Posts: 5
How is it possible to do in US only with 20k and after what will be the price to convert here?
cheema12 is offline  
Old 21st Aug 2021, 08:23
  #1007 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Wherever I lay my hat
Posts: 3,145
I literally just told you that. Read 61.129.

As for conversion to EASA: you'll need the medical, 14 exams and (thanks to CBIR) training as required for the IR. You should be able to comfortably convert in about 10 hours. You can work it out based on your local prices.
rudestuff is offline  
Old 21st Aug 2021, 10:57
  #1008 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Location: Leicester
Posts: 5
What is it 61.129? Thanks
I opened i thread few days ago, I’d appreciate it if you could help. It’s very hard to start, I don’t have nobody that can give me a suggestion.
cheema12 is offline  

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