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Dog dies in overhead locker on UA

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Dog dies in overhead locker on UA

Old 15th Mar 2018, 12:24
  #101 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
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Originally Posted by Thud105 View Post
Can't help but feel that its a shame that MaggieGremminger (who by her own admission was in the row behind) sat there for three hours and did nothing. Sometimes, if you're not prepared to be part of the solution then you are part of the problem.
Exactly. Not to mention the rest of the pax. Cowards the lot of them.
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Old 15th Mar 2018, 12:29
  #102 (permalink)  
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The FA should be arrested, prosecuted and jailed for animal cruelty (or whatever the colonial equivilent is in that state).
I won't predict what the outcome might be, but in any case the incident is being investigated by the Harris County DA's office. And United will require brightly colored tags on all bags containing pets.
HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) -- The Harris County Animal Cruelty Task Force is investigating the death of a dog on a recent flight from Houston.

The District Attorney's Office told Eyewitness News they could file charges based on the findings of the investigation.
Complete story here (with video)
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Old 15th Mar 2018, 12:47
  #103 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Capt Fathom View Post
When you read of all the issues that arise, you have to wonder about the lack of people skills!

I was yelled at by a Flight Attendant (on a flight across the US) when I stood up to retrieve a book from the overhead locker.
Unbeknown to me, one of the pilots had left the flight deck to use the bathroom.
Apparently I was supposed to remain alert for this situation, and also know I wasn't allowed to move a muscle whilst this toilet break took place!
I avoid situations like this by not travelling by air unless I utterly must. Your experience isn't unique.
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Old 15th Mar 2018, 15:02
  #104 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
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Really?

Originally Posted by Zombywoof View Post
Exactly. Not to mention the rest of the pax. Cowards the lot of them.
Shall we review again the pictures of Dr. Dao being dragged off a flight with a concussion and broken teeth? Passengers feeling intimidated and cowed by UAL is not exactly irrational.
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Old 15th Mar 2018, 15:06
  #105 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
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Originally Posted by megan View Post
Absolutely no sympathy at all, given the breed of dog
Isn't it reasonable to assume that if an airline offers to the market, "bring X on the plane" as a service for sale, it's the airline's job to understanding what kinds of X can and cannot be safely transported, and making that clear? Where do you expect the expertise to reside, regarding what kinds of cargo, live or otherwise, can safely be carried: with the airline or with the shipper? Some other airlines have specified that certain breeds of dogs cannot safely fly and do not allow them. United chose to not make such a distinction, took this customer's money, and grossly failed to provide the service for which they were paid.
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Old 15th Mar 2018, 15:11
  #106 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
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Originally Posted by megan View Post
The woman had gone through the necessary process to carry an emotional support animal? If not, I don't see that the condition of carriage allow the animal to be in the cabin.
Then you're simply not reading the news articles. The dog was not carrried as an "emotional support animal," the dog was carried under United's "bring your pet for $125" commercial offering.

Straight from the horse's mouth at United's published terms:

United allows domesticated cats, dogs, rabbits and household birds (excluding cockatoos) to travel accompanied in the aircraft cabin on most flights within the U.S. An in-cabin pet may be carried in addition to a carry-on bag and is subject to a $125 service charge each way. There is an additional $125 service charge for each stopover of more than four hours within the U.S. or more than 24 hours outside of the U.S.
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Old 15th Mar 2018, 18:50
  #107 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Gauges and Dials View Post
Straight from the horse's mouth at United's published terms:
Too bad you didn't quote the next paragraph:

A pet traveling in cabin must be carried in an approved hard-sided or soft-sided kennel. The kennel must fit completely under the seat in front of the customer and remain there at all times.

United chose to not make such a distinction, took this customer's money, and grossly failed to provide the service for which they were paid.
Completely false. They boarded the dog. It was the customer's responsibility to place the dog under the seat and leave it there. For whatever reason, the owner refused to do this and placed the dog in the aisle, thereby violating the conditions of carriage.
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Old 15th Mar 2018, 19:08
  #108 (permalink)  
 
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Zombywoof, your ridiculous posts are either through sheer ignorance or deliberate trolling:

...the owner refused to do this...
There is NO evidence to support that comment.
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Old 15th Mar 2018, 19:15
  #109 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by BEagle View Post
There is NO evidence to support that comment.
Wasn't it you who posted the statement of a witness that the dog was in the aisle?
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Old 15th Mar 2018, 19:24
  #110 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by clareprop View Post
Yes..and a moron who can't be bothered to read the facts as they've been shown about five times. Which bit of 'we accept full responsibility' can't you get your thick head around?
The FACTS are that the dog was supposed to be under the seat, and if it was where it was supposed to be this thread wouldn't exist.

As for "we accept full responsibility", what do you expect them to say after worldwide publicity? Damage control.

The owner has responsibility here, whether you want to admit it or not.
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Old 15th Mar 2018, 19:28
  #111 (permalink)  
 
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+1 for Clareprop
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Old 15th Mar 2018, 19:33
  #112 (permalink)  
 
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I expect this entire ad hominem exchange to be deleted shortly, so let me just sum up the thread:

Bad, bad UAL.
Bad, bad FA.
Dog owner= candidate for sainthood.

Is that about right?
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Old 15th Mar 2018, 21:13
  #113 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
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Originally Posted by bront View Post
If the pic of the dog carrier next to the pram a few pages back is the actual bag then how the hell was it meant to breath in the first place as I don't see any ventilation holes in it.


A woman with an infant and an 8 year old will come with a heap of hand luggage, nappies, toys etc. so maybe she had already filled the spaces under her and the child's seat and had tried to get away with the dog being in the aisle.


I feel sorry for both the family and the FA but I think the real blame lies with the fact that you can have an animal in the cabin in the first place. Imagine the drama at the escape slide with the pax lining up with dogs, cats, pigs and peacocks (WTF is with that anyway?). I would be pretty p1ssed if I died because of an animal slowing the process down.
A small amount of research shows that the soft pet carrier, airline approved is:


or


Clearly these carriers are ventilated.

The passenger would have had access to both her own seat space and her daughter's. If the spaces were filled with other baggage, it's obvious that the other stuff should have gone in the overhead locker, not the dog. I doubt very much that the dog was the passenger's first choice.
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Old 16th Mar 2018, 19:58
  #114 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2017
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Originally Posted by PDR1 View Post
The fact that this allegedly dogless bag barked continuously until it died must have been a bit of a clue, surely? Or are you saying that the typical United FA has the intellect of a 3-day old cheese sandwich?

The FA should be arrested, prosecuted and jailed for animal cruelty (or whatever the colonial equivilent is in that state). So should the captain, because as we are repeatedly told the captain has absolute authority over, and thus absolute responsibility for everything that happens on his/her aeroplane.

And then the family shgould sue the airline, the captain and the FA for the personal pain and suffering resulting from the unlawful torture and execution of their beloved pet. I would assume that the american legal system will award judgements of the order of $500m against each defendant in such a case (based on my extensive study of legal documentaries like LA Law and Suits).

Or is this just another case where the airline and the pilots claim that no matter what happened it was always someone else's fault? I'm amazed so many can pass a class-1 medical despite apparently lacking a spine...

PDR
Ooorrr the owner of the dog could accept responsibilty for trying to fly with a breed of dog that is by and large banned from most airlines and about 20 seconds research into the breed would advise that due to its compromised airways it shouldn’t be on the plane.
It breaks my heart that a dog was stuffed in an overhead locker, it’s not right, but if the dog shouldn’t have been on the plane in the first place, the owner has to shoulder some blame.
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Old 16th Mar 2018, 20:38
  #115 (permalink)  
 
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United Airlines does not stipulate limitations on the carriage of brachycephalic dogs such as Frenchies. His carriage was fully within the airline's terms.

I doubt whether the owners knew about the health risk to their puppy posed by flying. Modern airliners fly with a greater cabin pressure than those of earlier generations, so cabin altitude is likely to pose less of a risk than hitherto.

The agony and fear suffered by this poor little dog before he gave up his struggle for life must have been truly horrific. The family would have been traumatised and perhaps even the FA might have been shocked when she realised what her cruelty had caused, but neither suffered the fate of that poor defenceless little animal.

I hope that there's someone with a big enough heart in the USA who will offer a new French Bulldog puppy to that distraught young girl.
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Old 16th Mar 2018, 20:58
  #116 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
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Does anyone have stats on the number of pets who die in flight while travelling in the cabin?

Perhaps I'm wildly adrift of the facts, but I imagine most of the deaths that do occur, happen when the animal is in the hold, alone and unmonitored.
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Old 16th Mar 2018, 22:26
  #117 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Gauges and Dials View Post
Isn't it reasonable to assume that if an airline offers to the market, "bring X on the plane" as a service for sale, it's the airline's job to understanding what kinds of X can and cannot be safely transported, and making that clear? Where do you expect the expertise to reside, regarding what kinds of cargo, live or otherwise, can safely be carried: with the airline or with the shipper? Some other airlines have specified that certain breeds of dogs cannot safely fly and do not allow them. United chose to not make such a distinction, took this customer's money, and grossly failed to provide the service for which they were paid.
Bingo. Or they could even go the extra mile with customers pets:

slight thread drift but IIRC, many, many years ago an airline, which one I can't remember, brought into LGW (I think) a large Alsatian in a crate.. Just they'd lost the paperwork .. and no-one knew who the dog belonged to so they couldn't contact them.

The dog was extremely unfriendly and couldn't even be approached, let alone allowed out of the crate, so couldn't be given any exercise until someone remembered that 'old Fred' was 'good with dogs'. And Fred came over, made friends with the dog and even managed to take it out for walks on the airfield.

A few days later a guy turned up and said "Hi, I'm here to collect my Siberian wolf" ...
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Old 16th Mar 2018, 23:27
  #118 (permalink)  
 
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The doggy, a breed with physically restricted nasal passages, was clearly stressed by being alone in a dark environment, but hypoxia or asphyxia is a relatively painless way to go. There was a gradual loss of oxygen. You pass out and expire. It is not like physical suffocation, such as strangling, or even drowning for that matter. Who knew the overhead compartments were air-tight anyway ? Or are they not air-tight ?
And if they are air-tight, why ?



Last edited by evansb; 16th Mar 2018 at 23:51.
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Old 16th Mar 2018, 23:35
  #119 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
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Well, since a second dog was placed on the wrong United Airlines aircraft this week and the an unscheduled landing was made in Akron, Ohio to save the day. Maybe United Airlines needs to check animals in like humans, boarding pass, etc.
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Old 17th Mar 2018, 01:14
  #120 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by evansb View Post
Who knew the overhead compartments were air-tight anyway ? Or are they not air-tight ?
And if they are air-tight, why ?
I think it’s been established they are not airtight, and there’s no reason for them to be. But if if you’ve flown recently — especially in cattle class — you may have noticed the bins are packed to the gills, as has been noted in numerous previous posts. The typical approved pet carrier is likely to have its vents compromised in such a situation, regardless of the breed of animal.

Nice archive photos, BTW. But the sprog is not exactly cooped up in the bin with a shed load of pax carryons, is it? Simpler times, for sure. But back then, people had to pay real money to fly, or so I’m told.
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