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Snoozing pilot misses landing - The Australian

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Snoozing pilot misses landing - The Australian

Old 29th Nov 2018, 20:48
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There is a post on FB from the guy who conducted his IPC -
the pilot had spent the previous weekend at the funeral of a close mate who had suicided.
he clocked in for work the previous night at 10pm, flew to Tassie, did non flying tasks (such s sorting freight), and fell into bed somewhere around 2am.
the bed is a communal single bed, in a noisy room lit by the nearby streetlight.

apparently the company are in disputes with the union regarding paying below award wages.

on another note, it is my experience that companies who don’t pay the award are also cutting corners on maintenance.

MeNwhile, down the road, an ethical operator who pays the award and follows the rules is slowly going to the wall because they can’t compete on the cheap prices offered by companies of this ilk.....as others say, it’s a race to the bottom.
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Old 30th Nov 2018, 00:42
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Iíve only once seen a crew member fall asleep
It's an event that happens, and will keep on recurring. C-130 PIC told of waking up to find his three other flight deck members had nodded off as well. Probably the most famous case was a DC-8 freighter flying from east coast USA to LAX, overflew LAX heading for Hawaii, three flight deck crew finally woken by the chimes ATC calling on SELCAL. Admit to it myself when the other chap was flying.
I don't recall a similar situation with any other charter operator ever
You need to get out more, though being a pot/drug head you wouldn't know what was real.
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Old 30th Nov 2018, 02:06
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Plenty of GA colleagues used to fly with a digital watch tucked inside headset with alarm set to get off before top of descent.
I canít remember the name of that so called aviation expert (not JT, some other ignorant numpty) quoted as saying that aviation fatigue rules are rigorous and it shouldnít happen.
Well mr numpty, itís been happening for decades. The only change is that this poor bloke was on ADSB etc and got caught out. Unfortunately the story got picked up internationally and isnít a good luck for the industry.
Hopefully he survives CASA /AVMED. .

. I don't recall a similar situation with any other charter operator ever.
you havenít been around long have you?
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Old 30th Nov 2018, 03:26
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Those with memories of the ANA and Ansett/ANA days would know of the late Jason Hazzard. An FO who flew with Jason on the long haul to Perth told of his experience on the DC4 . Jason never gave away a take off or landing. He'd take off from Essendon, call "gear up, your aircraft". Then he'd reach up and turn the heater to full and go to sleep. If the FO so much as touched the heater control Jason would immediately, as in his sleep, reach up and put it back to full. The FO would get the clearances approaching Perth, join the circuit or be on a five mile final straight in. Jason would come to life, call "Gear down, my aircraft". "He was a tired man", said the then FO, recalling those distant days, and nights. Jason was also a big man. He declined a slot on the DC9 when they first came on line, preferring to wait for the B727, which better suited his bulk.

In an earlier century I did a stint with air ambulance. One night at around 0100, coming in with a medical emergency, I dropped off briefly just short of descent. The controller had raised his voice "Alpha Bravo Charlie - are you diverting ? " and then "do you read?" . I opened my eyes and saw that the autopilot had taken us off course (due to a fault) and shamelessly said "Oops. . .I was fiddling with the course director which seems to be playing up. . . all ok now". (Don't think I fooled anyone.)
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Old 30th Nov 2018, 03:27
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Take it easy leave the young guys alone, give them a go like we were given... just give the pilot that fell asleep a warning and a fireside chat and get on with it he won't do it again. RELAX we have all seen and done it before.
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Old 30th Nov 2018, 03:33
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PPRuNe has many bitter old has-beens who never were
When you have your name in aviation history books get back to us whipper snapper. Folks here have experiences you will never match, despite your aviation career taking off. AVMED is aware of your drug habits I presume, and you comply with CASA's requirements?
For certain applicants, routine periodic urinalysis (or other tests) for substance use is a requirement of continued medical certification. It is medico-legally essential that such testing be performed in accordance with the specified protocol, as determined by CASA for the individual applicant.It is essential that the test substrate is appropriate to the substance(s) under investigation for example blood, urine or hair. Please seek advice from CASA.One of the features of addiction related behaviour is denial. To promote recovery, openness and transparency is required involving the applicant, the regulator (CASA and DAME) and the operator. Delays in provision of required tests, adulteration of specimens and concealment of use all suggest stabilised abstinence has not been achieved. DAMES are encouraged to promote an open discussion between all parties about the proposed surveillance and the importance of compliance. CASA will usually seek the applicant's consent to share medical information openly between the applicant, company medical advisers, union and relevant medical specialists. This facilitates a faster return to work together with a greater opportunity for workplace support in recovery. Relevant sources of advice and assistance include:Note: DAMEs should view with concern any delays or other failure to comply with testing and surveillance requirements. CASA should be notified of such concerns as soon as practicable.
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Old 30th Nov 2018, 07:50
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Originally Posted by rich34glider View Post
Haha. Leo W**ker, one of Hoge’s best characters, and very appropriate on this thread.

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Old 30th Nov 2018, 11:47
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Being tired or fatigued are two reasons pilots fall asleep , sitting next to a dick runs a close third !
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Old 2nd Dec 2018, 02:28
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Spot on! Come home pissed off and listless. "Oh no! You haven't got 'so far up himself' for another month? " (List all the 'god's gift to aviation' you have had to endure.)

An unforgettable moment on a four hour sector - Sue brings up coffee for the caffeine starved drivers. FO Murray sits there preening himself as usual. Sue - "I've been meaning to tell you Murray - that women find you irresistible " Murray - "You think so?" Sue - Of course - but how did youfind out?"

A certain Peter comes into the aforementioned category. His surname led to derisive alternative versions . The horror of it all was brought home when his airline marketing freaks decided to put his face up enlarged 100 times on a hoarding on a six-story hotel on the city approaches.

Last edited by Fantome; 2nd Dec 2018 at 03:35.
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 08:12
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Sleeping pilot kept flying

hxxps://www.atsb.gov.au/publications/investigation_reports/2018/aair/ao-2018-075/

(Unable to post URL links just yet, replace the xx to to tt to make https)

After landing at King Island, the pilot continued with their shift flying to Moorabbin without obtaining additional rest.
Interesting statement. Was judgement and common sense influenced by this fatigue as well? It feels a basic duty of care is completely missing here!

Any idea what sort of duty or exemption this was operated under? ATSB seem to have left out a few things in the report regarding sign on/sign off times and what the previous 48-72 hours actually entailed for the individual/roster.

Curiously as well, in this example would the checking of NAIPS say at home (Before a tour of duty has even commenced) count as duty or not? A log in would be recorded with a date and time stamp plus what briefing/s have been requested.
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 09:52
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KING ISLAND PILOT ASLEEP.

Channel 9 news today - (Neither breaking news or put together by a plane spotter)
A freight pilot who fell asleep at the controls on a flight to King Island and was unable to be reached by radio, had been awake for 24 hours.
The pilot, who was the only person on board, started to feel tired after leaving Devonport and quickly fell asleep while the plane was on autopilot, overshooting the destination by 78 kilometres.
The Piper PA-31 aircraft later landed without incident and the pilot then flew from King Island to Melbourne to complete his shift.



The Piper PA-31 was the model of aircraft involved in the incident. (Supplied)
The Australian Transport Safety Bureau on Tuesday published a report into the flight on November 8 last year, finding the pilot had been awake for about 24 hours after being unable to sleep prior to take off.
The pilot's fatigue was at a level known to affect performance and even if the pilot had been able to sleep before the flight, he still would have been fatigued, the report said.
"This investigation highlights the need for pilots to assess their level of fatigue before and during their flight," the ATSB's Nat Nagy said.
"Before commencing night operations pilots are encouraged to modify their usual sleep routines to ensure they are adequately rested.
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 10:40
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Who hasn't fallen asleep asleep under similar circumstances? Kinda show commercial pressure is still alive & well despite our wonderful FRM that kinda exists!
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 10:45
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Eight months to write a report stating the bleeding obvious that you will be very tired after 24 hrs without sleep.
Amazing the pilot continued onto Moorabbin without further rest.
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 11:05
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If you snooze, you lose!
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 11:28
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I’ve only had a chance to read what’s been posted here. Fantome’s news article makes mention of the pilot 8 times, and the operator..... zero. Would that be an accurate summary of the report?
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 11:57
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Again, same thing. Poor fellow, made a mistake and getting hammered for it when nobody got harmed. I don't understand what it is that we're after here. As of 2019 it should be a well documented fact that humans are prone to make mistakes, esp. when fatigued. Another well documented fact in modern times is that humans are known to not always make rational decisions, a trait magnified by fatigue, alcohol, drugs, emotional stress, or any combination of those in any amount.

However it is not as well documented and understood a fact, in my view, that specific individuals of said species will always receive disproportionately much media attention when making silly mistakes such as the above at the command of an aircraft as opposed to, say, when driving a car, making important business decisions, choosing their life partner, surfing in shark infested waters or electing the ruling party in this country.

Seriously: why is that? Let's cut that pilot some slack. I'm sure the fact that they woke up alive at all served enough as a lesson.
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 12:03
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Pilot who fell asleep at controls was allowed to continue his shift

Pilot who fell asleep at controls was allowed to continue his shift

theaustralian.com.au

A pilot who fell asleep while operating a cargo flight in Tasmania had been awake for 24-hours prior to the incident.

An Australian Transport Safety Bureau report into the incident, which occurred on November 8 last year, found the pilot was “acutely fatigued to a level affecting performance”.

Despite his lack of sleep, the pilot flew from Moorabbin in Victoria to Devonport, Tasmania, had a three-hour break, then headed off again to fly to King Island.

During the flight he nodded off, waking up to find he was almost 80km past his destination.

From 7.25am to 7.33am, air traffic control tried to contact the pilot without a response.

The ATSB report said at 7.33am a transmission was received from the pilot who advised that operations were normal.

He landed the Piper PA-31 at King Island at 7.55am and contacted his supervisor and air traffic control in Melbourne to discuss what happened.

Despite the in-flight nap, the pilot was allowed to finish his shift, flying from King Island back to Moorabbin.

The ATSB investigation found the pilot recalled not feeling fatigued before the morning flight which was his first after five days off.

During the three hour break at Devonport, the pilot said he rested but didn’t sleep.

“From the information reported by the pilot, it was determined that at the time of the occurrence, the pilot had been awake for about 24-hours,” said the report.

“Using the information obtained at interview and the pilot’s roster, fatigue analysis was conducted, which identified that the pilot was acutely fatigues to a level known to affect performance.”

The report took aim at operator, Vortex Air, pointing out that “despite knowing the circumstances of the incident, no measures were put in place to ensure the pilot was fit to continue the shift”.

“This resulted in the pilot continuing to fly the aircraft while still being fatigued to a level known to affect performance,” said the report.

Vortex Air managing director Colin Tucker said he spoke to the pilot on the ground that morning, and he assured him he was fine to fly.

He described the incident as a “tiny blip” that had caused considerable damage to the company despite its “exemplary safety record”.

“We’ve been flying for 15-years and it damages your brand. It’s a competitive air space we fly in,” Mr Tucker said.

He said the pilot was badly affected by publicity surrounding the incident but had returned to flying and was doing well.

“If you’ve been on leave for five days before a shift, there’s nothing as an organisation we could’ve done,” said Mr Tucker, adding the pilot was aware of his roster before he went on leave.

Changes had since been made to the rostering system to provide more notice for pilots but Mr Tucker said occasionally last minute changes were necessary.
"exemplary safety record" as in like Qantas?
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 12:13
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Well he was rested before he continued his shift as he'd just had a good nap....
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 12:29
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Originally Posted by compressor stall View Post
Well he was rested before he continued his shift as he'd just had a good nap....
Interesting operator who would allow the pilot to continue on to Moorabbin after an incident like this.
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Old 25th Jun 2019, 12:47
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Why was there no examination on the rest facility at DPO? Was it actually conducive to sleep? Definitely an odd decision not to bunk down for an hour or two at that time of night.
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