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FAA CFI and future plans

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FAA CFI and future plans

Old 27th Oct 2016, 00:00
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FAA CFI and future plans

Hello everyone here a Commercial Pilot asking for opinions and experiences,I recently got my FAA CPL SE and ME with IR in Florida,just got back to Italy for a vacation with the family my plan now would be this:

Pelican Flight training situated in Miami Florida would provide me training as a CFI (plus CFII and MEI) price listed around 21k...then hire me as a flight instructor (with a F1 visa) for 1 to 2 years maximum,that would lead me to gain my 1500 hours of experience and be more likely to be chosen by airlines around the world,and alsomy plan is not really to go back to Europe (would love to work in asia or middle east if possible) since i have heard my EU fellas are straggling with wages (ridiculous wages of 1000$ a month clear slavery) after spending 150k+ on a B737 Type and etc. then convert maybe into a Easa licence...or directly get an ATP from the FAA since i already have US licenses..

what would you guys do? would you spend some more extra money on a CFI++ training and build hours starting from the bottom as flight instructor with my FAA licenses or stay in europe convert all my licenses into EASA (also a pain since have to pass the 14 exams of the atpl and convert all of my licenses and ratings) and then try to get into the aviation business here in europe (really low at the moment from what i have seen) PRO and CONS? anybody with similar experience? every opinion is gold thank you guys!
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Old 27th Oct 2016, 15:48
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1500 Hours will land you a job at any regional in the US. Question is:
Will you have a right to work in the US? if not, get your ratings at a place that you can work at.
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Old 27th Oct 2016, 20:22
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I ll have a work permit valid for 2 years only then i will have to go somewhere else i was thinking about asia to build some time
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Old 28th Oct 2016, 10:56
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I was offered the same, however some people commented me it was illegal, so I've asked SEVIS and the answer is quite straight forward:

Sent: Monday, March 28, 2016 4:04 PM
To: SEVP
Subject: VISA F1 for Flight Instructor Courses

Hello!

I've been offered an opportunity to proceed with my CFI (I and II) and CFI ME courses and after complition stay some time for OPT with an F1 visa given by a flight school on Florida, however I've also receive some feed back from other sources that this is not legal if you do not complete also basic training (PPL,CPL, IFR) wich I already done in the past in USA with my F1 VISA, can you confirm if I can proceed?

Best regards.


Answer:

Good afternoon.

Thank you for your inquiry. If you would like to attend a flight school, you will need to file an I-539 to change your visa status to M-1 with USCIS. An F-1 student cannot attend a flight school.

If you have additional questions or concerns, please contact the SEVP Response Center

Kind regards,

SEVP Response Center
Student and Exchange Visitor Program
US Immigration and Customs Enforcement
500 12th St. SW STOP 5600
Washington DC 20536-5600
Phone: 703-603-3400
Toll-Free: 800-892-4829

Last edited by spaflyer; 28th Oct 2016 at 11:00. Reason: Adding info
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Old 28th Oct 2016, 11:17
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@spaflyer
Thank you for your response,but that's not always true I have met people who did it and now are working as Cfi if you attend Cfi cfii and Cfi mei you can be granted a F1 I believe because it's more than 25% of the whole training (PPL IR CPL ME => CFI CFII CFIMEI) if you just ask for cfi training they will not give it to you but if you do all the others yes
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Old 28th Oct 2016, 11:18
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And btw did you try at pelican?
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Old 28th Oct 2016, 11:59
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georgebramb1, It's not my opinion, is SEVIS one! Is people doing it? yes, same as there's people working illegally in USA and they might do it for years without been unnoticed.

You can get a F1 if you are a full time student at an Academic Center, for example Embry Riddle, and you do a Degree in Aviation and this includes as part of the training a pilot license. Same with an Integrated course, but if you ALREADY have even a PPL, then is not any more an integrated course.

Is up to you if you want to run the risk of been catch, deported and banned to get in the USA for 10 years.
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Old 28th Oct 2016, 18:48
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Just go back to Europe and convert those licences and look for a job !
1500h of Flight Instruction won't do you any good to find a job at airlines around the world. Besides the US...

And It's coming from an EU National, with an FAA ATP and no EASA ATPL. I'm currently flying an A330 abroad (outside EU).
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Old 28th Feb 2017, 15:48
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any update on legality of this f1 programme

Hi all,

is there any update on the legality of this f1 private to cfi/cfii/mei programme?

I've been told that because you'd be enroled in a full training you could get an F1 visa. Even if you already hold an FAA CPL. As a comparison, no one prevents you from going to multiple classes at different universities, although you would not get have the need to do your final exam again as you already hold the degree, does this sound plausible?

Also, looking at work prospects, what would be the advantage, if any, or chances of getting another type of visa without having to marry a us chic?

I don't see how spending another 20k on cfi training would get me access to US regionals or any other airline in the world. Would anyone have a different view on this as I'm trying to move forward with my career, with a CPL ME FAA licence atm.

Thanks guys
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Old 28th Feb 2017, 17:41
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The SEVP Response Center answer above that F-1 students cannot attend a flight school is incomplete.

Full-time, accredited Professional Pilot Programs at some schools are indeed eligible for F-1 visa issuance.

Some of these programs will accept "transfer credits" or equivalent, which may include previously obtained certificates/ratings (e.g., a PPL, at their discretion). There are probably some accreditation rules which state that a minimum of x% of the required training time must be completed as part of the program.

So is it legal?

Depends. If you were accepted & enrolled into one of the approved, full-time Professional Pilot programs mentioned above, then it's perfectly legal. You may be issued an F-1 visa and may be eligible for the F-1 CPT and OPT work permits.

If you intend to just take a some CFI courses at a flight school without pursuing an approved Professional Pilot course, then it's not legal. You must attend under an M-1 visa, and may only be eligible for limited OPT.

My 2 cents.
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Old 28th Feb 2017, 18:45
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Thanks @peekay4, that's what I though also and it makes sense..

Any idea of what to do next after that training? I'm I'm not able to secure a work permit, that's just a waste of money as piston experience won't do much abroad.
I'm not even considering Europe also as it is expensive, loads of pilots available and just a bunch of jobs for selected boys.
Does anyone has experience or information about moving from an F1 to a regional?

Many thanks
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Old 4th Mar 2017, 15:31
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that's just a waste of money as piston experience won't do much abroad
And that's a bit of an ignorant statement really.
There is no substitute for experience and if you want to work as a professional pilot..well you need to work as a pilot flying whatever you need to fly in order to gain experience.
Do not underestimate the value of instructional hours.

And you cannot work for a Regional with an F1 visa.
There are only 2-3 visas that lead to the issuance of a green card and the F1 is not one of them.
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Old 5th Mar 2017, 12:42
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Originally Posted by B2N2 View Post

And you cannot work for a Regional with an F1 visa.
Thanks for your information.
I've been told of people working for regionals on F1 OPT.
There are a few that only ask for work permit and don't require a green card.

Not sure if you are aware of any other limitations?

Thanks
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Old 14th Mar 2017, 16:12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B2N2

And you cannot work for a Regional with an F1 visa.
Thanks for your information.
I've been told of people working for regionals on F1 OPT.
There are a few that only ask for work permit and don't require a green card.

Not sure if you are aware of any other limitations?
Well, I'd be really careful with that in light of the new Trump administration! To my knowledge if you get caught working illegally in the States, besides being kicked out of the country immediately, you're banned for lifetime not only for 10 years (which was mentioned above post #7).

I agree with the statement of "B2N2" that one can't work for a US Regional with an F1 visa. As a non US-citizen being issued the respective visa to work as a CFI (flight instructor) you can only work as such and only for the respective flight school.

My advise to the starter of this thread would be (even though it's from October of last year, but it might be useful to other readers), for a EU citizen I'd say instead of spending your money on an FAA CFI (which is certainly a great experience, but unfortunately useless here in Europe) I'd rather spend it on doing the conversion and get the EASA frozen ATP, since that's where you stand the best chances of getting hired as a rookie pilot.

Regarding the pilot jobs abroad (middle and far east) they're usually looking for highly experienced pilots with a couple of thousand hours on commercial airplanes like Boeing or Airbus, they aren't looking for rookie pilots, and if so they usually give preference to their own fellow countryman - like any other country does (in case of the thread starter this would be Italy/EU).

Last edited by Transsonic2000; 14th Mar 2017 at 21:55.
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Old 14th Mar 2017, 23:43
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A school in Oregon is offering F1 visas for brazilian CFIs.

The propose is that a holder of a Flight Instructor License issued by Brazilian CAA (ANAC) would go to the US, convert his/her license to CPL, do the CFI and start the OPT, working at least the first year as CFI at the school.

The second year of OPT is open, so you can continue at the school or change job. They advertise with the history of some 3 guys who trained with them and flew the CRJ for some months during the second year of OPT.

That experience wold be of great value here in Brazil, where Azul sometimes hires FO with as low as 150h TT to fly brand new ATR 72 or Embraer E-190/195 and Avianca Brazil sets its minimum at 500h TT for the A320 family. As well it can open the doors at Copa Airlines of Panama, who asks 1000h TT of anything with wings and an engine to fly the B737NG across the continent.

My question is, is it true? Is really possible that one with pilot license (foreing) can do this process and work for two years, under the F1 visa?
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Old 15th Mar 2017, 06:12
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My question is, is it true? Is really possible that one with pilot license (foreing) can do this process and work for two years, under the F1 visa?
Yes and no.

It's not possible to get a 2-year OPT on a CFI course. An OPT period is only 1 year, unless pursuing a full academic degree (Bachelor's, Masters, etc.) in STEM -- Science, Technology, Mathematics.

What they're probably talking about is a 11 month CPT (as part of the course) plus a 1-year OPT after graduation.

US regionals require at least 1,000 hours (with a suitable bachelor's degree). No US airline will hire you on an OPT to fly a CRJ "for a few months". There must be more to the story there.
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Old 15th Mar 2017, 08:55
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I agree with the statement of "B2N2" that one can't work for a US Regional with an F1 visa. As a non US-citizen being issued the respective visa to work as a CFI (flight instructor) you can only work as such and only for the respective flight school.
This is absolutelly not true. You can work on campus for up to one year, then be issued a cpt for up to 11 months which allows you to work at the school or for another school and thereafter an opt where you can work wherever, charter part 135 or regionals.

US regionals require at least 1,000 hours (with a suitable bachelor's degree). No US airline will hire you on an OPT to fly a CRJ "for a few months". There must be more to the story there.
It's not the regionals that require this. This is mandated by the FAA.
It's important that people don't get misinformed in this forum.

There are different regionals that require a green card, others only that you are entitled to work in the US. Donmt forget about charter operation companies under part 135.
You can work with an opt for any of these.
There have been cases of regionals sponsoring pilots after the opt expires.
This however is hear-say and one should not rely on this is if they depend on the jet experience to move forward.

Regarding the pilot jobs abroad (middle and far east) they're usually looking for highly experienced pilots with a couple of thousand hours on commercial airplanes like Boeing or Airbus, they aren't looking for rookie pilots, and if so they usually give preference to their own fellow countryman - like any other country does (in case of the thread starter this would be Italy/EU).
True but not the full story.
As you mentioned, they usually give preference to nationals and more experienced pilots. However they have twin turboprop planes also and cadet programmes and second officer direct entries.
Some accept from 400+TT. Susiair even accepts 250+ and they hire frequently.

The secret in aviation is to not stop flying otherwise you only have a very expensive piece of paper stowed away without any proficiency or currency when you get the call.
Will a 1500h pilot current single piston have more chances than a 250h fresh graduate who haven't flown for a year? I'll leave you guys to answer that but I know who they'd pick. Will it beat the jet requirement time? Hell no but not all companies ask for jet time.


This is just my 5 cents..as I'm struggling with similar decisions at the moment, US and Canada seem like a good option, converting to EASA also but all options have pros and cons.
There are plenty of people with a licence in Europe for the limited number of jobs so if you don't have any reference, your chances are dimm..
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Old 23rd Apr 2017, 00:23
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As a crusty, early retired EASA ATPL & FAA ATP holder, I'm needing to do a CFI & CFII rating.

Any recommendations on which school to go for with a balance of good instruction/cost?
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Old 24th Apr 2017, 13:10
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Consider Canada - see this thread.
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Old 24th Apr 2017, 14:03
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Originally Posted by mines_a_coffee View Post
As a crusty, early retired EASA ATPL & FAA ATP holder, I'm needing to do a CFI & CFII rating.
mines,

You mention two regulatory regimes. Under which would you be "exercising the privileges of..." ?
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