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Reciprocal agreement with the EU on the transfer of UK CAA Flight Crew Licences.

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Reciprocal agreement with the EU on the transfer of UK CAA Flight Crew Licences.

Old 29th Apr 2021, 09:40
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Banana Joe

You see, thats the beauty with being independent, you’re able to negotiate new and prosperous agreements.
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Old 29th Apr 2021, 09:48
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Originally Posted by Contact Approach View Post
The UK should abandon EASA and join the FAA. Far greater opportunities.
UK has already left EASA. What kind of opportunities would you expect by UK joining the FAA (even though I don't think this is even possible under USA federal law)?


Originally Posted by Contact Approach View Post
Brexit is over and its time for a new chapter. Good bye Europe, hello America! Quite nice to get rid of the many language barriers too.


UK has been so far unable to negotiate some sort of bespoke trade agreement with the USA - and there doesn't seem to be an optimistic outlook on that front. I doubt you'll be getting any green cards for pilots soon.
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Old 29th Apr 2021, 09:50
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Keep dreaming, you need a reality check. Why not only pilots and not also the other professionals that facing consequences of your stupid Government's actions? Why have Americans not done it with their Canadian or Mexican neighbours and why would they do it with someone on the other end of the Atlantic?

You need a solid reality check.

Last edited by Banana Joe; 29th Apr 2021 at 10:13.
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Old 29th Apr 2021, 09:58
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Hardly, negan, and don't get me started on the EUs wrongful triggering of article 16, while hypocritically making threats about borders checks, which with their current siege strategy, only serves to stoke the violence.. Anyway, let's forget about green cards - a separate issue, and it's unlikely in the extreme. The FAA on the other hand, is a breeze for crew and operators to deal with, practical, and safe. I think the UK CAA is to small to stand alone in modern aviation, and being stuck with being licenced by a little known minnow authority, in the international arena, is very unattractive.

Last edited by Sick; 29th Apr 2021 at 10:08.
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Old 29th Apr 2021, 10:01
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If only there was a world-renowed aviation regulating authority, with which UK had nearly 100% full alignment already. If only...
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Old 29th Apr 2021, 10:04
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Hahahaha! Knew I’d get him! I’ll get my coat.
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Old 29th Apr 2021, 10:08
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Contact Approach

Hahaha. Best of luck to ya. So far the best UK has managed is to mirror the agreements already held by the EU. And notably nothing agreed with the US, your supposed new best friend…

Exactly what improved leverage in negotiations do you achieve as a country of 502 billion pounds GDP (UK 2020), vs 13 trillion USD (EU 2020).

Extending your logic based on these statements, anybody that have been freed from the EASA shackles should be happy now that they finally have a proud sovereign UK License. So no need for this thread. Right?
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Old 29th Apr 2021, 10:16
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Sick

Let's assume such a deal was to go forward, can you explain me why only pilots and not other professionals like the architects, accountants, analysts, etc? It's not like we're a class of privileged brats, are we?
And they aren't short of pilots either.

You can have all the licenses you want, but you won't go far without the ability to live in the US or EU unrestricted.
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Old 29th Apr 2021, 10:26
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I say again, nothing to do with British pilots working there. I'm talking about the aviation regulatory structure, whether it's just an rough alignment, or through to the Belgrano being like an FAA regional office. I dunno. But everything I have encountered with the FAA has been sweetness and light compared to the UK or EASA.
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Old 29th Apr 2021, 10:27
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Green cards, Res visa, work permits. One world and very political. Licence recognition, can get very arrogant. A marriage (?) forget it. Another time, looking at the Canadian route, I was told by a Canadian Company that they would "love to hire " me but needed me to first produce a Res Visa. Canadian Embassy would not unless I had a specific job offer. I told them that the Company first needed a Res Visa and asked if both sides might entertain a discussion. Never heard from either again and just dreamed of sipping a Jack & Coke in Vancouver Heights !
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Old 29th Apr 2021, 10:28
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Sick

We agree that the FAA is a breeze to work with. And I would argue that in Euope we could learn a couple of things on how to structure flight training.
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Old 6th May 2021, 11:46
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Hi,

It seems there is a variation from EASA on acceptance of ATPL exams.
I successfully completed mine in 2009.


FCL.025 (c) states the following:
Validity period(1) The successful completion of the theoretical knowledge examinations will be valid:
(i) for the issue of a light aircraft pilot licence or a private pilot licence, for a period of 24 months;
(ii) for the issue of a commercial pilot licence, instrument rating (IR) or en route instrument rating (EIR), for a period of 36 months;
(iii) the periods in (i) and (ii) shall be counted from the day when the pilot successfully completes the theoretical knowledge examination, in accordance with (b)(2).
(2) The completion of the airline transport pilot licence (ATPL) theoretical knowledge examinations will remain valid for the issue of an ATPL for a period of 7 years from the last validity date of:
(i) an IR entered in the licence; or
(ii) in the case of helicopters, a helicopter’s type rating entered in that licence.
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Old 6th May 2021, 12:04
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Originally Posted by Contact Approach View Post
There is no valid argument as to why training undertaken pre-brexit, under EASA and completed across the EU is no longer recognised other than political nonsense.
I'm probably repeating myself here,

The UK has decided that it does not want to be governed by the ECJ. The ECJ enforces the regulations as dictated by EASA.

How, if the UK has left the EU, can the ECJ enforce the law on a UK citizen when the UK does not recognise the authority of the ECJ? It can't. Hence, the situation in which we find our selves.
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Old 6th May 2021, 12:26
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Turin,

I think you are missing the point. The UK have little to do with training conducted in EASA states pre Brexit. Why cant those who conducted Integrated / Modular courses at FTE Jerez pre Brexit apply for a new EASA licence based on this training?

A UK citizen can hold an EASA licence so whats your point?
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