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AF447 final crew conversation - Thread No. 1

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AF447 final crew conversation - Thread No. 1

Old 26th Dec 2011, 15:52
  #941 (permalink)  
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Thanks, Gerard - I did say I was 'confused' and I have caught up now.
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Old 26th Dec 2011, 15:57
  #942 (permalink)  
 
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You are welcome, BOAC.
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Old 26th Dec 2011, 16:41
  #943 (permalink)  
 
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Maajam,
I certainly wasn't implying that the Captain would have been "disturbed" by sensations of climbing or descending, only expressing the hope that he would have thought about their potential significance when called to the cockpit in this emergency very soon after experiencing them.

Anyway it's a minor point and one we can only speculate on since we know nothing about his state of mind before re-entering the cockpit.
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Old 26th Dec 2011, 19:05
  #944 (permalink)  
 
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GerardC
You can see from the CVR extract that the captain asked Bonin if he had an ATPL licence to confirm that this FO was qualified to do the job (PF + "relief captain" from the right seat) as per SOPs.
.. can you comment (or explain) the difference concerning Bonin certifications (licenses etc ..) in preliminary BEA reports N1 and N3 ?
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Old 26th Dec 2011, 22:06
  #945 (permalink)  
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what kind of seat-of-the-pants sensation the pilots were experiencing with a 10,000fpm descent? Were give hey in a "steady-state" of some kind with no sensations?
Aside from having your ears "pop" as the pressure increases from, what is it, 8,000 feet altitude to sea level, if you're falling straight down, I'm not sure what would give you a clue aside from the altimeter.

This was a dark and stormy night, so remember external cues were non-existent.

I've always heard it called the "baby barometer" when infants wail on descent, as they are far less able to equalize the pressure differential in their ears as pressure increases.

This is why flight attendants used to hand out gum for children to chew ,which helps open the air channels, hence reduce pressure / pain / wailing, or at least let a child suck on something, be it a teething ring or momma's breast (discretely).
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Old 26th Dec 2011, 23:47
  #946 (permalink)  
 
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I don't think that anyone should read this thread anymore unless they have themselves locked in the dark in the cupboard under the stairs at 03.00, with their wife banging constantly on the outside, and occasionally opening it and shining a bright strobe light in their face, as they look at an adjacent iPad showing a picture of an A-300 instrument display.

Then try to read, and respond, coherently and accurately.

That's not to necessarily excuse this crew, but to try and realise some of the conditions that they were working under - maybe ?
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Old 27th Dec 2011, 01:22
  #947 (permalink)  
 
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YorkshireTyke:

That's not to necessarily excuse this crew, but to try and realise some of the conditions that they were working under - maybe ?
Perhaps you have some emotional investment in this terrible crash.

Plain and simple, they couldn't handle a stall of their own making. Seems like a trend in the industry these days.
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Old 27th Dec 2011, 02:29
  #948 (permalink)  
 
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aterpster

The suggestion to be locked under the stairs is, of course, farcical, but it was first mooted to me many years ago by a retiring Captain, who said that he was going to do something like that every now and again in his retirement, with the occasional snack meal thrown in on a tray, so that he would never forget the terrible conditions that he had, at times, had to work under!

One of my early instructors expressed the opinion that one became 50% less intelligent as soon as the wheels left the ground, I thought he was being terribly rude about an early attempt at re-flight planning to a diversion, but over the years I learned what he was on about, under stress, and with everything apparently falling apart, there are times when the brain seizes up, and the Simulator can't think of everything during training.

I think there is little doubt now as to what happened, but do we know WHY ?

The technical investigation is over, but is is not time to now start the CRM, Human Factors, investigation into what made them act in the way they did ?

The Monday Morning Quarterbacks have the benefit of working in their air conditioned lounge, with subdued lighting, and soft music, maybe a beer or two at hand, a privilege denied that crew working during normal sleeping time, at night, in and out of the ITZ - we're told. Try doing it locked in a cupboard, as I suggested.

Apologies if this point of view has already been covered, I have neither the time nor the energy to trawl through the whole thread again !

Cheers.
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Old 27th Dec 2011, 02:55
  #949 (permalink)  
 
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Plain and simple, they couldn't handle a stall of their own making.
There was nothing "plain and simple" about this accident. It doesn't require an "emotional investment" to hold that view, either.

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Old 27th Dec 2011, 04:15
  #950 (permalink)  
 
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"Seems like a trend in the industry these days. "

Having read this thread from the start, this is, without a doubt, one of the scariest comments I've read thus far!
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Old 27th Dec 2011, 04:30
  #951 (permalink)  
 
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I believe that the flight crews forward planning carried out in Rio was not as it should have been.
Having seen the weather forecast for the flight and the problems that could be encountered flying in this area, a much clearer command and control structure should have been emphasized by the Captain of the aircraft. Especially concerning Command & Control of the aeroplane when he was absent from the Flightdeck.
Which brings me to another major issue I have, all the flight deck crew knew they were flying into weather problems. If they also knew that aircraft ahead of them had made course and altitude alterations to go round these serious weather issues, why was the same decision not made by this crew?

A lot of the problems here as far as I am concerned come down to poor forward planning and management by an experienced Captain in Air France.
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Old 27th Dec 2011, 05:38
  #952 (permalink)  
 
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The biggest problem for this captain was knowing when to let these two rookies take command of his aircraft without him babysitting them.
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Old 27th Dec 2011, 15:49
  #953 (permalink)  
 
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Originally posted by jcjeant :
can you comment (or explain) the difference concerning Bonin certifications (licenses etc ..) in preliminary BEA reports N1 and N3 ?
Sorry I do not work for BEA and I have no idea why Bonin's licence details were omitted in BEA report N1.

IMHO, if something was wrong with Bonin's licence :
1 ) Bonin would NOT have told his captain that he was qualified to operate as "relief captain" ;
2 ) I have no doubt that BEA would already have raised the issue.
(We are now TWO and a half years after the crash ! Don't you think two and a half years are more than enough to double check all these licence details ?).

IMHO again, it is high time to put an end to this "urban legend", now.
For whatever reason Bonin's licence details were omitted in BEA's #1 report.
These details were mentioned in BEA's #3 report.
Full stop.
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Old 27th Dec 2011, 18:55
  #954 (permalink)  
 
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With respect, it doesn't actually matter too much, whether he held an ATPL/FATPL/CPL . . . Hell, even a PPL.

What assuredly mattered, was that, when handed the aircraft by the autopilot, following the instrument "wobblies," to handfly, he A- zoom climbed several FL's above the cleared one B - stalled C - failed to recognise he had & therefore D - failed to initiate any recovery action,& indeed continued with quite contrary control inputs.
Having read the other thread, a long way back, about instrument failure/false overspeed indications & uncommanded climb by the "wonder-plane", to counter this , perhaps uncharitable summary, & being something of a "Frog/Airbus conspiracy believer", I am willing to be disproved (indeed more willing than most)
In the absence of that, I have to say his performance was below that expected of a PPL student,never mind a PPL, so (the variety of) his licence? "frankly my dear, I don't give a damn"
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Old 27th Dec 2011, 19:37
  #955 (permalink)  
 
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The biggest problem for this captain was knowing when to let these two rookies take command of his aircraft without him babysitting them.
Rookie? Babysit? Take command of his aircraft?! What planet do you live on? In today's real world both pilots are equally qualified to fly the aeroplane the main difference being that one has to sign the paperwork. To assume only the Captain is truly capable of aviating is to ask for another AirBlue crash (next thread down) where it was actually the FO that could fly and the Captain that killed them all.

The crash itself was not caused by flying through the storm or the the Captain going to sleep, it was caused by two qualified pilots not recognising a stall. As playstation says any person qualified to fly any aeroplane should recognise a stall, one doesn't have to be a Captain.
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Old 27th Dec 2011, 19:58
  #956 (permalink)  
 
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GerardC
IMHO again, it is high time to put an end to this "urban legend", now.
For whatever reason Bonin's licence details were omitted in BEA's #1 report.
These details were mentioned in BEA's #3 report.
Full stop.
Just to put an end .. it's to not forget that is was the BEA that created this "urban legend"
No foot note (in the report N3 ..as the BEA like so much) to explain the omitted detail in the preliminary report N1

catplaystation
so (the variety of) his licence? "frankly my dear, I don't give a damn"
I'm certain that in the judicial process the lawyers will not "give a damn" and this "urban legend" will popup again .. unless it's some BEA foot note in the final report explaining the "printing error"...
It is the work of lawyers and judges to analyze each word printed in all reports submitted to them
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Old 27th Dec 2011, 20:48
  #957 (permalink)  
 
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I would be interested to know if this flight has been duplicated in the simulator and what reliable flight instruments and standby flight instruments the pilots had available to them to manually fly with on this black over water night flight?
It appears to me the handling pilot might have been told or had demonstrated to him that... in an emergency the Airbus would keep him safe if he applied thrust and pulled the side stick fully rearwards..... he appears to have done exactly this.
The other pilot (correct me please if necessary) does not seem to have taken over side stick priority as the situation got worse...and this raises the point with me just what sort of instrument scan was going on by both of them...and what instruments they had been taught they could absolutely trust in an emergency situation.......if any.
I ask as a Boeing pilot with no Airbus exposure.
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Old 27th Dec 2011, 21:58
  #958 (permalink)  
 
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Babotica, every airline I have flown with I would agree that the FO's are probably as qualified as the captain. Not in this case. They lost airspeed and the autopilot and immediately pulled the SS into a full stall. They gained 3,000 ft and held full back SS until impact minutes later. That is a fully competent crew? Come on. Without the autopilot they were not competent to fly the airplane as demonstrated clearly in this crash. This was a routine flight until they lost airspeed and autopilot. Then they needed someone who could hand fly by pitch and power until they got the airspeed and autopilot back. Nobody in the cockpit at that time could do that. Sad, isn't it?
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Old 28th Dec 2011, 00:39
  #959 (permalink)  
 
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In the sim ...

... I've flamed out one and then the other, failed the ISIS (standby instruments) and introduced unreliable airspeed on both sides though with different indications. In-flight start not successful and in instances when the crew has become completely confused, the aircraft has stalled and started its descent. The reaction from the more inexperienced has been to pull back on the stick.

This is left to continue until the suggestion is made to push the nose down. Lift is regained and they recover the 'aircraft'. (They then get an engine back etc) ...
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Old 28th Dec 2011, 03:15
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How many devices were there within that cockpit that give a reading of speed whether ground or air?
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