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Ethiopian airliner down in Africa

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Ethiopian airliner down in Africa

Old 26th Apr 2019, 20:45
  #4381 (permalink)  
 
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Learned a lot

Amazing thread. I always believed that the 737NG was a redesigns similar to the 747-400 - shocking to here it is still FBC.
I saw that reference was made to the AF447 crash - truly shocking. And very helpfull. The AF crash makes very clear that problematic pilot skills are not at all related to the mother country of the airline in question. And that makes the discussion about possible pilot shortcomings in relation to the 737Maxs crash bearable, because one thing is clear: Nothing becomes worse than errors made during the AF crash, and this was a true European airline’s crash.
(Same goes for AirEgypt 990 and Germanwings 9525)

Written by a surprised Pax.
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Old 26th Apr 2019, 21:18
  #4382 (permalink)  
 
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Fly the damn aircraft....

Originally Posted by HundredPercentPlease View Post
Simple.

Remove the flaw. Either remove the aerodynamic stability problem or make the FBW fix a proper one (like an Airbus, triple inputs, 14 computers, multiple layers of automatic or selectable degraded flight modes).

Train the pilots. If a single failure (here AoA) causes a monster, then prepare the pilots by training.

As someone who has moved back and forth, twice, between the 737 and A320, I can't begin to describe how lowly I view the Renton tractor. Boeing made a flawed aircraft and failed to mandate sufficient training. The pilots are as much victims as the passengers. No doubt at all.
There will never be a flawless aircraft or flawless maintenance or flawless training or flawless pilots. But at the end of the day, it is the pilots and their passengers who will be on the receiving end of these inevitable flaws. Thus our focus and our determination to overcome those flaws ought to be greater.

Throughout the history of aviation, pilots have been handed unique malfunctions or adverse situations for which there was no prior history, no procedure, no checklist. Many of these situations were also initially confusing, mentally taxing, and potentially paralyzing. Some crews performed, if not flawlessly, at least well enough to stabilize the situation and get the aircraft safely back to earth. Some crews did not.

In a remarkable number of these events, the difference between success and failure came down to the exact same answer - the crew's ability to overcome the startle effect, look past the distractions, and focus on the basics of flying the aircraft. Turn off the automation, set the proper attitude, set the power, trim out the control forces, monitor the performance, move the aircraft away from the threat. The pilots don't have to be perfect or diagnose the problem right away. Fly the aircraft and buy some time. Very, very few of our non-normals need to be executed so fast that we can't first devote the majority of our attention and the necessary time to flying the aircraft.

Training is key, but it has to be the right kind of training. Training scripts in the simulator where you pretty much know not only the problem but the answer ahead of time do little to prepare a pilot for the visceral challenges of the unexpected. Overemphasis on automation to the point that even seasoned pilots feel that tad bit of discomfort when the autopilot and autothrottles click off is a definite warning sign. When all goes to hell, do you have a good idea - right now - where the aircraft pitch and power and airspeed should be for takeoff? low altitude? high altitude? missed approach? Do you know your memory items and limitations cold? If not, you have some homework to do.

It is too late to save the crew and passengers of these two accident, but it is not too late to learn from them. Some commercial pilots have stated here that they could not have done any better, and I'm here to say that is a cop out. If you are a commercial pilot and feel that you cannot - under the duress of distracting warnings and information - turn off the automation, set a reasonable pitch and power setting, establish a climb, hold a heading, and trim the controls as necessary, then you need to do something about that right now.
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Old 26th Apr 2019, 21:58
  #4383 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by HundredPercentPlease View Post
When I was trained on the 737 (classic and NG), the stab trim runaway was a runaway - where the trim wheel ran continuously. We would identify it as a runaway, because it was continuously running, and flick the switches.

1. MCAS activation is not continuous, it's bursts.
2. The 737 trim system likes to provide bursts of random trim at certain times (STS) so bursts are considered normal.

This is why the Boeing excuse "they should have done the runaway stab QRH to fix the MCAS problem" is a load of utter nonsense. 737 Driver - pinning this on lack of airmanship will costs lives in the future.
Back in November 2018 Boeing issued a bulletin about the MCAS Stab Trim problem and many airlines responded by removing the word “CONTINUOUS” from the Runaway Stabilizer checklist.



Last edited by Lost in Saigon; 27th Apr 2019 at 03:24. Reason: Photo of checklist added
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Old 26th Apr 2019, 22:01
  #4384 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Lost in Saigon View Post


Back in November 2018 Boeing issued a bulletin about the MCAS Stab Trim problem and many airlines responded by removing “continuous” from the Runaway Stabilizer checklist.

What exactly was the MCAS Stab Trim problem?
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Old 26th Apr 2019, 22:37
  #4385 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by 737 Driver View Post
..., and I'm here to say that is a cop out. If you are a commercial pilot and feel that you cannot - under the duress of distracting warnings and information - turn off the automation, set a reasonable pitch and power setting, establish a climb, hold a heading, and trim the controls as necessary, then you need to do something about that right now.
Of course everyone here can do that. The ET crew could do that. Do you really think that an 8000 hour 737 captain didn't know how to do that?

You are missing the point - which is why they didn't do that. Or maybe why they couldn't do that. Or most importantly, why you may not do that as some point in the future.

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Old 26th Apr 2019, 23:15
  #4386 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Bend alot View Post
What exactly was the MCAS Stab Trim problem?
The “problem” was explained in the Boeing Bulletin issued back in November 2018 after the Lion Air accident.

“Uncommanded nose down stabilizer trim due to erroneous Angle of Attack during Manual flight only”

Ethiopian airliner down in Africa
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Old 26th Apr 2019, 23:26
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Originally Posted by HundredPercentPlease View Post
Of course everyone here can do that. The ET crew could do that. Do you really think that an 8000 hour 737 captain didn't know how to do that?
There is no practical difference between a pilot who does not have certain skills and a pilot who cannot demonstrate those skills when needed.

You are missing the point - which is why they didn't do that. Or maybe why they couldn't do that. Or most importantly, why you may not do that as some point in the future.
Actually, this is exactly my point. I'm sure on nice sunny day with no distractions, or maybe with a jumpseater who could provide a third set of eyes, or perhaps during a pre-briefed sim session when they knew the malfunction was coming, either the Captain or First Officer could have parked the pitch at 10 degrees, set the power to 80% N1, trimmed the stab up to neutral no matter what spurious inputs the automation was making, and flown safely away from the ground. Unfortunately, in the real world we do not always have the luxury of being free from distractions, or having that jumpseater, or having our emergencies pre-briefed.

Why indeed could these crews not perform to the standards expected of a commercial pilot? Perhaps automation dependency and lack of hand-flying experience? Maybe an airline and training culture that emphasized rote procedures or systems management over basic airmanship skills? Sim training that was long on following scripts and checklists and short on big picture flying? First Officers that were light on experience and/or discouraged from speaking up when necessary? Perhaps some personal issues with the specific individuals? I could go on, but this would be a good start. I suspect the various accident boards will be looking at all these issues.

Yes, they could have and they should have but they didn't. That is why the human factor element of these accidents cannot and should not be ignored.

Last edited by 737 Driver; 26th Apr 2019 at 23:37.
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Old 26th Apr 2019, 23:44
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Originally Posted by Lost in Saigon View Post


The “problem” was explained in the Boeing Bulletin issued back in November 2018 after the Lion Air accident.

“Uncommanded nose down stabilizer trim due to erroneous Angle of Attack during Manual flight only”

Ethiopian airliner down in Africa
It is interesting that the revised runaway trim card in the official emergency AD is significantly different from the one in above, the note about using manual electrical trim was moved to the bottom and is not directly below the 'action' items. See page 7:

http://rgl.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Gu...2018-23-51.pdf

Would a pilot converting to MAX in November have seen the Boing bulletin or just the revised per emergency AD manual?
Are the bulletins typically discarded when an official AD is issued?

Both of them talk of 'higher control forces may be needed' they do not specifically state that the manual trim might be unusable in a significantly mistrimed state.
Would be easy to read that as referring to column forces, especially by a someone not trained in the 'unloading'/ roller coaster maneuver

Last edited by MurphyWasRight; 27th Apr 2019 at 00:07. Reason: Added Comment on forces
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Old 27th Apr 2019, 00:03
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Originally Posted by MurphyWasRight View Post
It is interesting that the revised runaway trim card in the official emergency AD is significantly different from the one in above, the note about using manual electrical trim was moved to the bottom and is not directly below the 'action' items. See page 7:

http://rgl.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Gu...2018-23-51.pdf

Would a pilot converting to MAX in November have seen the Boing bulletin or just the revised per emergency AD manual?
Are the bulletins typically discarded when an official AD is issued?
Also with the inclusion of "up to 10 seconds" clearly directed at MCAS - by MCAS not reference in either document.

Seems like a cover up - a non cover up would have given pilots more tools, like a L/H AoA failure can cause...............
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Old 27th Apr 2019, 00:21
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Originally Posted by MurphyWasRight View Post
Both of them talk of 'higher control forces may be needed' they do not specifically state that the manual trim might be unusable in a significantly mistrimed state.
I don't know for sure, but I think this statement might be a reference to activation of the Elevator Feel Shift Module (EFSM). This module is one of the 737 systems that may be activated by a stall signal from the Stall Management Yaw Damper (SMYD) computer. Activation is accompanied by annunciation of the FEEL DIFF PRESS light which is one of the symptoms mentioned in the AD.

Relevant quote from the 737 Aircraft Maintenance Manual (AMM)

EFSM Operation

At stall onset, either SMYD sends a signal to energize the dual coil solenoid valve on the EFSM. The EFSM operation occurs when all of these conditions occur:
• Stick shaker is active
• AOA is 8 to 11 degrees more than thermal anti-ice (TAI) biased stick shaker AOA
• EFSM is not inhibited due to low altitude or the airplane is on the ground.

When all of these conditions occur, the SMYDs energize the dual coil solenoid valve. The solenoid valve sends 3000 psi system A pressure to the pressure-operated mode valve. The mode valve opens and sends pressure between 820 psi to 880 psi from the pressure reducer to the system A side of the dual feel actuator. This increases the control column feel forces up to four times nominal feel. The increased feel force makes sure the pilots cannot easily override automatic stabilizer movement to nose down pitch of the airplane.
The FCOM has similar (though less detailed) information, though oddly it states the control forces only double.

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Old 27th Apr 2019, 01:37
  #4391 (permalink)  
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I've tried to look into the minds of the pilots in the latter part of this thread. I've even suggested that the ET PF's prior knowledge may have been counterproductive. The realisation that he is experiencing the same set of issues that were disastrous only months ago may have been truly alarming, countering any advantage he could have gained by having prior knowledge.

Suppose he was fixating on the attitude - he knows it's what he's supposed to do in this scenario. But he's also learned the autopilot could take the technical problem away and so frantically stabs at that a few times. Remember, things are very, very unreal to him at this time. Someone retorted that he didn't remember the flaps shouldn't be raised. Fair comment, but only recalling part of a briefing is not surprising at this moment.

So what's happening if he was focussing on the attitude? One thing's reasonably certain - he will* experience some tunnel vision. Not optical, but a kind of narrowed visual processing. Could it conceivably be enough to stop him seeing the wheel's white flashes? It seems impossible but how else is that protracted period of automatic spining explained? Is it the STS working harder, since the power is still high? I doubt he was that analytical with his hands full and being deluged with bad news.

*Being human is having more sub-processing going on that in the Boeing. We've all seen the spinning radar head change direction, despite knowing it hasn't. Or the Necker wire frame cube. We know that a sudden change happens, but what is incredible is that in most humans, it happens after a given number of seconds. That is very serious interference with our concious processing. Just an amusing bit of psychology, until you realise just how susceptible we are to our minds doing their own thing. A lot goes on that we can not escape from. Training around illusionary effects of acceleration and the products of fear is all we can do, and that's easier said than done.
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Last edited by Loose rivets; 27th Apr 2019 at 12:50. Reason: Cranking changed to Spining as former implies hand cranking
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Old 27th Apr 2019, 01:55
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via Flight Global

https://www.flightglobal.com/news/ar...-train-457736/

US pilots test Boeing’s new computer-based Max training


26 APRIL, 2019 SOURCE: FLIGHT DASHBOARD BY: JON HEMMERDINGER BOSTON

Boeing is sharing a proposed computer-based pilot training session with US pilot unions as part of its work to return the 737 Max to service, several sources familiar with Max’s re-certification efforts say.

The computer-based training session reviews the 737 Max’s speed trim system and the manoeuvring characteristics augmentation system (MCAS), which has been identified as among factors contributing to two 737 Max crashes.

Boeing has said it is developing new training, as well as updating the MCAS software, but the Chicago-based company has released few details.

Sources, who decline to be identified, now say Boeing has been sharing the computer training with pilots from unions representing cockpit crew at major US airlines.

The sources indicate that the airframer seeks to solicit feedback and objective input from pilots, and to ensure the aviation community’s involvement in efforts to return the Max to service.

Boeing’s proposed computer-based training can be completed on laptop or tablet computer, and takes as little as 15min, sources say.

The new speed trim training course comes in addition to existing computer training for pilots transitioning from the 737NG to the 737 Max. That existing course can be completed in less than 1h, according to one pilot.

Boeing did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Some US pilots say 15min is enough to understand the speed trim system, noting their familiarity with the 737 Max. Other pilots have, more broadly, expressed frustration for receiving what they describe as minimal training when transitioning from the 737NG to 737 Max.

Three US airlines operated the 737 Max prior to the Federal Aviation Administration’s 13 March grounding: American Airlines, Southwest Airlines and United Airlines.

The three unions representing those company’s pilots decline to comment. The unions include the Southwest Airlines Pilots Association, the Allied Pilots Association, which represents American’s pilots, and the Air Line Pilots Association, which represents United’s cockpit crew.

The FAA will need to sign off on Boeing’s training and its software update, prior to lifting the 737 Max grounding, sources note.

What is still unclear is whether regulators might require training in addition to the computer-based sessions, such as time in a flight simulator.

However, on 25 April, Southwest Airlines chief executive Gary Kelly cast doubt on the possibility of additional simulator training. “We are not hearing that will be a requirement," he said. “Managing the aircraft in a runaway stabiliser scenario is something that we've already covered.”

The day before, Boeing chief executive Dennis Muilenburg said the company had completed 135 test flights with the MCAS update, equating to more than 230h of flight-test time. The airframer has said it completed flight tests of the software update on 17 April.

Last week, an FAA panel released updated pilot training standards that now call for pilots to receive ground training that addresses MCAS “system description, functionality, associated failure conditions and flight crew alerting”.

“These items must be included in initial, upgrade, transition, differences and recurrent training,” the updated report said.

Boeing introduced the speed trim system on the 737NG, then added MCAS to the Max. MCAS ensures the types operate similarly by pushing the Max’s nose down if the system senses it is too high.

MCAS activated prior to the October 2018 crash of a Lion Air 737 Max 8 and the March crash of an Ethiopian Airlines aircraft of the same type. It apparently activated following input of faulty angle-of-attack data, investigators have said.

Boeing’s Muilenburg has taken responsibility for updating MCAS, though the crashes have spurred discussion about pilot training and questions about what role pilots may have played in the crashes.

Both investigations are ongoing.
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Old 27th Apr 2019, 02:36
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Pretty interesting video about pilot decision making.

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Old 27th Apr 2019, 03:03
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Boeing’s proposed computer-based training can be completed on laptop or tablet computer, and takes as little as 15min, sources say
Well that sounds like thorough and comprehensive training to me! Seriously, four hundred people died, it was the pilot's fault entirely, and this is their solution?

Last edited by Water pilot; 27th Apr 2019 at 03:32.
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Old 27th Apr 2019, 03:21
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Originally Posted by Winemaker View Post
Pretty interesting video about pilot decision making.
Interesting indeed. Covered in a thread on this forum last year: Miss Velma's engine failure and crash landing at Duxford from the cockpit
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Old 27th Apr 2019, 03:27
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Originally Posted by Water pilot View Post
Well that sounds like thorough and comprehensive training to me! Seriously, four hundred people died, it was the pilot's fault entirely, and this is their solution?
Water pilot, you do understand it is in addition to the differences training that can be done in under an hour on the iPad!

I hope the rest of the world regulators fight for correct training levels - what ever that maybe, but I doubt 15 mins cuts it!
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Old 27th Apr 2019, 03:29
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Originally Posted by Water pilot View Post
Well that sounds like thorough and comprehensive training to me! Seriously, four hundred people died, it was the pilot's fault entirely, and this is their solution?
15 minutes training? No offense to all the professionals on this forum, but I will not get close to any MAX, an unstable airframe will be fixed by a software patch, and such will require 15 min training? When certifications were written there was bot software patch, airframes havd to complay by DESIGN
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Old 27th Apr 2019, 03:29
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Originally Posted by Water pilot View Post
Well that sounds like thorough and comprehensive training to me! Seriously, four hundred people died, it was the pilot's fault entirely, and this is their solution?
How many hours/days/weeks/years of training do you suggest is appropriate to reinforce/retrain that one needs to use normal trim to re-trim to an appropriate speed and then use the pitch trim disconnect switches in the event of an MCAS or runaway trim event?
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Old 27th Apr 2019, 03:37
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Objectively, seven pilots from various countries failed to recognize the "obvious" fact that they had runaway trim. A whole bunch of people died as a result. If this is a training issue, I want however much training is required to correct this deficiency.
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Old 27th Apr 2019, 03:40
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Originally Posted by formulaben View Post
How many hours/days/weeks/years of training do you suggest is appropriate to reinforce/retrain that one needs to use normal trim to re-trim to an appropriate speed and then use the pitch trim disconnect switches in the event of an MCAS or runaway trim event?
When you kill that MCAS or it has it's once limited "correction" - you are flying an aircraft that can no longer meet the certification requirements that it is approved for!

So say again - it no longer can meet certification requirements in certain flight modes/areas.

So how often do you fly outside certification limits? and how much training did you receive to do that? and was it on an Ipad?

This is not retaining - you have never flown in un-certifiable condition before on a 737 where MACS is required but not available.

Note this has nothing to do with a MCAS run away or trim run away - this is in normal flight when MCAS has been shut down (a number of events can now do this) or had one input and can not now, put in a second input to keep in certification limits..
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