Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Flight Deck Forums > Rumours & News
Reload this Page >

Qantas 744 Depressurisation

Rumours & News Reporting Points that may affect our jobs or lives as professional pilots. Also, items that may be of interest to professional pilots.

Qantas 744 Depressurisation

Old 25th Jul 2008, 08:25
  #61 (permalink)  

Pilots' Pal
 
Join Date: Nov 1998
Location: USA
Age: 63
Posts: 1,158
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I wish people like Cats Five would read rather than contribute. Nowwithstanding the dross in this thread, there is a lot of professional and well-informed fact also available, probably from those that fly and maintain the aircraft. Read and learn.
Bus429 is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2008, 08:31
  #62 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: ingerland
Age: 42
Posts: 81
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
forget that post re-edited AIRFRAMES.ORG - Aircraft Database
Phil1980's is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2008, 08:33
  #63 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: fort sheridan, il
Posts: 1,656
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
OK:

could it have been an oxygen bottle carried as freight? if there was a bottle as part of the ship's system, isn't there an over pressure protection/blow out disc?

perhaps carried without permission as passenger baggage?

I am reminded of the United flight that lost a door...but this isn't close to the door.

and to all who hate journalists...how would the majority of us even know about this incident without them?
sevenstrokeroll is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2008, 08:36
  #64 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: ingerland
Age: 42
Posts: 81
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
OMG BBC RADIO 1 just said "the plane plunged 100's of feet!" so like 900 feet then?
Phil1980's is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2008, 08:48
  #65 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: ingerland
Age: 42
Posts: 81
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
OMG BBC RADIO 1 just said "the plane plunged 100's of feet!" so like 900 feet then?
Phil1980's is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2008, 10:04
  #66 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: LONDON, UK.
Age: 52
Posts: 70
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
was this the same aircraft which was on stand at T4 yesterday around 1100 - stand 423 ?.
darrylj is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2008, 10:13
  #67 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Bottom side of up
Posts: 33
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
darrylj, there would (should) have been 2 QF aircraft at T4 around that time. QF 32 to Singapore - Sydney and QF30 to Hong Kong - Melbourne. Both depart about 1215 local so it could have been either one you saw.
Jed Clampett is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2008, 10:16
  #68 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: I live like a gypsy.
Posts: 105
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Unusual for the skin to fail rather than a door blow out a la Turkish DC10 etc. Do any of you remember BA's 747 100's and 200's that went to HKG (HAECO) for modifications and cabin upgrades (sunset 1 & 2) in the early 80's?

One 747-136 (G-AWNB I think) on the r/h/s forward of door 1R, the stringers and springers had detached from the airframe around the side area where the fuselage is almost flat. After that all the 747's had their "front ends" stripped down and modified. I think some of the work was subbed out to a company in Oz.
Poof in Boots is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2008, 10:19
  #69 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Lost track
Posts: 53
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
BBC World just finished reporting on "the big hole in side of the plane" again with a lengthy interview involving someone on a phone.
This pax said that she had just been served tea in a pot when there was this curious "pop".....then stuff and debriss flew throu the cabin....etc etc.
After several minutes of speculation and the usual horror scenario stuff, the BBC interviewer returns with the most important question regarding this incident...:"What happened to the pot of tea ?"



wonder if the teapot needs councelling ???

Oh dear ....an "EXPERT" has just said it looks like a hole made by an AA gun..
Stierado is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2008, 10:19
  #70 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: England
Posts: 1
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Keeping Calm

OK chaps. We don't know what caused the problem. It appears that the crew handled it professionally. Suggest that all who are not ATPLs or cabin crew or engineers should keep quiet, and those who are should comment in a professional manner. Sorry to play the schoolmaster, but some of the postings have been dire.
Guardsman is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2008, 10:23
  #71 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: ESGG N57º38'58 E012º16'03
Posts: 29
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Bonding?

Can't remember the exact type of material used for the forward wing-box fairing, but a little bell is ringing back there whispering it's a carbon-carbon reinforced, or carbon-reinforced fibreglass moulded section that is fitted aided by gravity in that the section "latches" onto retaining studs in the fuselage section, "hung" there and fitted, then the entire contact section bonded to the fuselage using epoxy and ultra-violet or infra-red heating to ensure the strongest possible bond betweene the two segments, prior, of course, to being spray-painted.

That particular area, together with, for example, radome hinge-joint areas and the lower sections of forward-facing cockpit window installations, have throughout the history of aviation been known blackspots for moisture intrusion... Wing box fairings aft are particularly susceptible to contact with ramp handling equipment (witness for example the number of A319 ULD-equipped incidents with Spanish-designed purpose-built "high"-loaders smashing serenely into the box), however the forward or leading-edge section of said wing-box fairing has an extrememly important function ensuring undisturbed airflow around the wing-root, over both the wing surfaces, along the fuselage and toward the tail section.

In this particular case, we do not yet know if it was an explosive decompression or if the incident was a result of a fatigue-induced "peel-away" of the bonded surfaces. In either case, the aircraft seems to have come off relatively unscathed; a blow-out would concievably have propelled detritis into Eng 3 and possibly Eng 4, the result of which would not make for bedtime reading.

It'll be interesting to follow this case through: the literature eagerly surrenders several seemingly similar cases, the most spectacular of which was the unintentional invetion of the B737 open-top Hawaii tourer.

God Speed.
pappabagge is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2008, 10:26
  #72 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 1999
Posts: 1
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Reports the B744 had corrosion problems

A simple search on Google reveals a report that the a/c, VH-OJK, was found to have corrosion problems in February 2008. As the first of 2 744's for QF delivered in 1991, this report makes sense!
Arsy Duck is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2008, 10:26
  #73 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: UK
Age: 44
Posts: 24
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
From Norway's Aftenposten

gazbert is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2008, 10:28
  #74 (permalink)  

Evertonian
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: #3117# Ppruner of the Year Nominee 2005
Posts: 12,475
Received 100 Likes on 57 Posts
Hi all. Went offline unexpectedly sorry. To everyone who PM'd me, I apologise. As it turns out, PAX67 has posted an almost identical photo to the one I had (external) so unless you really want it, I wont tie up yer phone with a photo download.

Now, where are the conspiracy theorists? Aircraft took the Pope home...hmmmm...c'mon guys, this should've been on page 1!!!
Buster Hyman is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2008, 10:45
  #75 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 266
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
What an immensely strong aeroplane. Uncontrolled depressurisation is no joke. The forces on those exposed bits of airframe during the subsequent controlled, but fast, descent would be considerable and it's a tribute to the design that there wasn't massive disruption around the wing-root. I think we have an incredibly near-miss here. Hats off to the crew and also to the designers.
worrab is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2008, 10:48
  #76 (permalink)  


Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Orlando, Florida
Age: 68
Posts: 2,586
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
www.msn.com has a link to a very short story on it.

Headline says aircraft flying Australia to London - story says London to Australia. Certainly nothing like checking the fects before publication, eh?

Had to laugh at the last line of the story.

The passengers will be given hotel accommodation while the aircraft is being repaired, said Alfonso Cusi, the airport’s general manager.
How many nights will that be then?
Keygrip is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2008, 10:49
  #77 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Stuck in the middle...
Posts: 1,638
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Vortsa,

Same thought crossed my untrained mind but was quickly followed by "but if something between the container and skin blew a hold in the skin, then the resulting decompression could then have ruptured the container" - rather than someting in the container being the root-cause.

Bit of speed-tape - bewdifuuul...

Well done to all involved in getting -OJK safely on the deck.
Taildragger67 is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2008, 10:50
  #78 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: firmly on dry land
Age: 80
Posts: 1,541
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
The quality of Gazbert's picture looks as if another round of well-informed speculation is due.

If I put my theory forward, and it is right, then I can claim "I was right, I told you so."

But I won't
Wader2 is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2008, 10:58
  #79 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: london
Age: 53
Posts: 12
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
The Wing to Body fairing is a Honeycomb Fibreglass fairing attached to the Fuselage by screws, not bonded to the skin. If it failed it would not damage the Aircraft skin.

The Passenger Oxygen bottles are in that area of the Freight bay but i think the last one is in the area just in front of the hole, if you look closely at the pic you can see the rear edge of the velcro'd curtain that covers them. Also as all Passenger Oxygen bottles are connected to each other, if one bottle blew then I think all Passenger Oxygen pressure would be lost, but not entirely sure! The fact that all Passengers had oxygen I think rules that out.

- 747 Engineer
MechanicalMan is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2008, 11:00
  #80 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Montgomery, NY, USA
Posts: 137
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Local TV in Boston is now reporting that the plane "plunged 2000 feet". I'll bet that the air at 28,000 feet is a lot easier to breathe than that thin stuff at 30,000. CBS News reporter out of London says "They are not sure if was an explosion, but it certainly was a "catostrophic" event. The lack of quality control, research and proof reading in professionial journalisim is stunning. I am to the point where I believe nothing they say or print.
patrickal is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.