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Pilot jailed for forging entries in his licence and logbooks

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Pilot jailed for forging entries in his licence and logbooks

Old 9th Apr 2022, 07:50
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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Given a basic renewal in an AS355 (ie without any refresher training) is easily the best part of £2,000...that's a lot of money to find when you are a freelance pilot.

Plenty of motivation there for some logbook/licence fiddling

Originally Posted by ersa View Post
Looks to me he examined his own ratings and passed.
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Old 9th Apr 2022, 12:31
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by johni View Post
Wow.

Although I am not surprised people fiddle their logbooks as the whole CAA type rating system is a very very expensive joke. If you are freelance it costs an absolute fortune just to keep the "cheap" ratings current - for the pleasure of sitting at home waiting for the phone to ring about work.

I understand NPAS suspended/fired a pilot in 2019 due to him forging his logbook.
The safety argument about safety being jeopardised does fall over slightly if a fixed wing class rating can be revalidated and not individual types all the time. Same for the rotary single engine grouping. However itís still a rule in europe, ME and Canada so you must comply.

Did the police pilot get a similar sentence? Given the nature of that type of flying I would suggest any contravention there far more of a safety concern than this stupidity/greed.

If not then there are serious questions to be asked of the CAA and judicial system.
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Old 9th Apr 2022, 13:42
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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Robbiee,

Apparently you do not know much about the Trucking Operation run by Walmart.

They run from Walmart Distribution Centers to Walmart Stores with the occasional stop on the way back to the DC to pick up drop and hook trailers at major suppliers to the DC's.

Rarely do they sleep in the trucks and when they do...they get paid extra for that.

For your standard Over the Road Truckers....you are closer to correct depending upon the Operator....and kind of hauling being done.

UPS over the road truckers work from Hubs and live at home....and have work days just as standard occupations do....and make excellent salaries with the usual Teamster benefits.

Trucking ain't all about Flying J's and Lot Lizards.

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Old 9th Apr 2022, 13:45
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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I think the NPAS pilot was dealt with internally and not prosecuted by the CAA. But I don't know the details for sure.

Originally Posted by Northernstar View Post
Did the police pilot get a similar sentence? Given the nature of that type of flying I would suggest any contravention there far more of a safety concern than this stupidity/greed.

If not then there are serious questions to be asked of the CAA and judicial system.
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Old 9th Apr 2022, 14:35
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by SASless View Post
Robbiee,

Apparently you do not know much about the Trucking Operation run by Walmart.

They run from Walmart Distribution Centers to Walmart Stores with the occasional stop on the way back to the DC to pick up drop and hook trailers at major suppliers to the DC's.

Rarely do they sleep in the trucks and when they do...they get paid extra for that.

For your standard Over the Road Truckers....you are closer to correct depending upon the Operator....and kind of hauling being done.

UPS over the road truckers work from Hubs and live at home....and have work days just as standard occupations do....and make excellent salaries with the usual Teamster benefits.

Trucking ain't all about Flying J's and Lot Lizards.
As with much of the helicopter industry, I don't have enough experience to drive for Walmart, so all I know is from their job ads.

If Walmart truckers aren't sleeping in their trucks much, then where are they sleeping on those six days a week away from home the job ads mention?

​​​​​​As for UPS? Like with Fedex (where my experience is) yes City and Road Drivers are home every night (or day as Road Driver is an overnight shift), but that's not really "over the road" sleeper cab, that's local day cab driving. Plus, those UPS jobs advertise 12 hour shifts. That's not what I'd call standard to other occupations.

As an entry level City Driver I made $21 bucks an hour with full benefits. Sure its better than every entry level job I've interviewed for flying a helicopter, but that pay doesn't cut it in the SF Bay Area,...unless you like living with your parents?

Getting to a liveable wage (let alone a middle-class one) in trucking can be just as daunting as in helicopters. However, given my experience with both industries, I'd say they both suck. To be frank, if I could make a living at it, I'd rather just drive the monorail at Disney World.
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Old 9th Apr 2022, 14:49
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Originally Posted by Robbiee View Post
Plus, those UPS jobs advertise 12 hour shifts. That's not what I'd call standard to other occupations.
Generally I don't like to persist with these threads, but you aspire to be a helicopter pilot in the USA. Unless you are one of the few that find and retain that golden job for a whole career, you will be flying HAA to keep the lights on at some point. The standard schedule is a 12 hour day. The vendors, Medtrans, Metro etc, will try and pay you nothing with minimal benefits, probably $70k to start. The non-profits will start you out in 6 figures with experience with generous PTO time, the same that their nurses and medics get. Flying a helicopter can be fun, but believe me I'm ready to jump ship...literally sometimes.
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Old 9th Apr 2022, 15:29
  #27 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Sir Korsky View Post
Generally I don't like to persist with these threads, but you aspire to be a helicopter pilot in the USA. Unless you are one of the few that find and retain that golden job for a whole career, you will be flying HAA to keep the lights on at some point. The standard schedule is a 12 hour day. The vendors, Medtrans, Metro etc, will try and pay you nothing with minimal benefits, probably $70k to start. The non-profits will start you out in 6 figures with experience with generous PTO time, the same that their nurses and medics get. Flying a helicopter can be fun, but believe me I'm ready to jump ship...literally sometimes.
Yes, I'm well aware that helicopter pilots often work 12-14 hour days. "Standand to other occupations" was referring to just that, other occupations. Here in the US we have a thing called the 9 to 5, 40 hour work week,...at least we used to.

Anyway, I'm not an aspiring pilot. I'm a pilot who has nowhere to rent anymore and thus must find a job flying if I ever want to go up again without a baby sitter. I hate this industry,...but trucking ain't much better.
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Old 9th Apr 2022, 15:44
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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Robbiee,

I did two Seasonal Stints with UPS driving Triple Trailers between southern Oregon and Portland....lived two miles from the Hub....was home every "night", had Weekends off, and considered staying for permanent but did not care for the Union Mindset that prevailed there.

My friends who made a career there and retired have all done well financially, have excellent health benefits, and upon getting into the single digit Seniority numbers had their choice of runs....all worked daytime only and were home right along with their neighbors.

They all had at least Six Weeks of Vacation, paid Holidays (if UPS was running), and never missed Elk Hunting Season.

The real bonus is they never moved from their hometown in their career.

The Delivery side of UPS is well paid and since the Reformation (No more Ride-A-Long Monitors with Stop Watches) it is hard work but far less stressful.

In life you have to pick your poison....helicopter flying and truck driving are not for everyone.

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Old 9th Apr 2022, 16:25
  #29 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by SASless View Post
Robbiee,

I did two Seasonal Stints with UPS driving Triple Trailers between southern Oregon and Portland....lived two miles from the Hub....was home every "night", had Weekends off, and considered staying for permanent but did not care for the Union Mindset that prevailed there.

My friends who made a career there and retired have all done well financially, have excellent health benefits, and upon getting into the single digit Seniority numbers had their choice of runs....all worked daytime only and were home right along with their neighbors.

They all had at least Six Weeks of Vacation, paid Holidays (if UPS was running), and never missed Elk Hunting Season.

The real bonus is they never moved from their hometown in their career.

The Delivery side of UPS is well paid and since the Reformation (No more Ride-A-Long Monitors with Stop Watches) it is hard work but far less stressful.

In life you have to pick your poison....helicopter flying and truck driving are not for everyone.
Yes, I know those local positions exist (I was in one at Fedex) but if you're home every night, its not OTR, and those Walmart positions they advertise state, "Home one day a week". So, they must be sleeping somewhere else for those other six days?

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Old 11th Apr 2022, 12:32
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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Angry

Johni,

Would it not be prudent for NPAS to have reported this case to the CAA? If this Pilot was falsifying his Logbook in NPAS, then there is a high probability that he also did this in his previous employment/s as well?
Also by dealing with this in house, other employers will have no idea what this pilot has done! For flight safety sake, and other pilots who have grafted for years building hours the right way, can we not name this culprit?

B.
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Old 11th Apr 2022, 15:02
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Brutal View Post
Johni,

Would it not be prudent for NPAS to have reported this case to the CAA? If this Pilot was falsifying his Logbook in NPAS, then there is a high probability that he also did this in his previous employment/s as well?
Also by dealing with this in house, other employers will have no idea what this pilot has done! For flight safety sake, and other pilots who have grafted for years building hours the right way, can we not name this culprit?

B.
I might be wrong but I'm guessing Johni is actually referring to this case: How NOT to become a Police pilot! - PPRuNe Forums
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Old 11th Apr 2022, 15:47
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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Sorry 212 man, I am led to believe this is a very recent incident from last year or so?

B.
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Old 11th Apr 2022, 15:49
  #33 (permalink)  
 
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I might be wrong but I'm guessing Johni is actually referring to this case
No, I am referring to an incident in 2019-20.
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Old 11th Apr 2022, 15:51
  #34 (permalink)  

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Originally Posted by Robbiee View Post
To be frank, if I could make a living at it, I'd rather just drive the monorail at Disney World.
Then Iíd suggest thatís what you aim for.

Having recently completed a 43 career in aviation, very little of this career path matches up to the over glamourised image often portrayed.

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Old 11th Apr 2022, 22:51
  #35 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by johni View Post
Given a basic renewal in an AS355 (ie without any refresher training) is easily the best part of £2,000...that's a lot of money to find when you are a freelance pilot.

Plenty of motivation there for some logbook/licence fiddling

When you say Ďrenewalí, do you mean an OPC/PC?

In the UK, this cost is covered by the helicopter operator. I canít recall a freelance pilot being asked to cover that particular cost. Well, certainly not by any reputable operator.
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Old 12th Apr 2022, 16:55
  #36 (permalink)  
 
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In the UK, this cost is covered by the helicopter operator. I canít recall a freelance pilot being asked to cover that particular cost. Well, certainly not by any reputable operator.
That was my thought too. Operator normally covers full aircraft/training captain cost for LPC/OPC, freelancer doesn't charge for their time to do the check flight...

...that's how it used to work anyway!

h14
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Old 12th Apr 2022, 18:09
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A U.K. HEMS operator who rely on freelance cover are known to demand roughly 3 days in return for an OPC, plus any line training days are unpaid. Part of the race to the bottom. Another who are supposedly multi crew and extend hours during summer expect freelancers to pay up to £2700 per hour in the charities own MD902 for a limited VFR p2 only type rating for an IFR operation. Seems though the caa are ok with that.
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Old 12th Apr 2022, 20:13
  #38 (permalink)  
 
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Yep, onshore operators expecting pilots to pay for type ratings and renewals is very common these days. Even with HEMS charities who have tons of cash.
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Old 13th Apr 2022, 06:45
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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3 days work for an OPC? That's about £1,350 you are paying the company.

The operator recently recruited for temporary summer pilots and had a lot of highly qualified/experienced applicants, so obviously pilots are happy to put up with this and there is no shortage of pilots.

Another who are supposedly multi crew and extend hours during summer expect freelancers to pay up to £2,700 per hour in the charities own MD902 for a limited VFR P2 only type rating, for an IFR operation. Seems though the CAA are ok with that.

Last edited by johni; 13th Apr 2022 at 08:28.
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Old 13th Apr 2022, 11:11
  #40 (permalink)  

 
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And fire, dangerous, goods, CRM......
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