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H130

Old 15th Oct 2015, 18:23
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H130 for external load?

I noticed at airbushelicopters web page that they have made deliveries of the H130 intended to be used mainly for external loads. It says max weight in the hook is 1500kg.


Has anyone here experience with flying sling with this machine? Considering that the H125 can lift 1400kg only on a very good day, how does the H130 perform? How's the fenestron performing during heavy lifts?
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Old 16th Oct 2015, 23:19
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The 130 is a great machine for sling ops....wether you prefer a camera or head out of the window...

You will be pushed to lift 1500kg , i normally pull about 1000kg with about 200kg of fuel on board , you will be hitting about 9 on the FLI

My outside air temps are about 25 deg c
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Old 21st Feb 2018, 11:40
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H130 Daily Inspection

Greetings Everyone..

I have to convince management about the accountability (ies) when a pilot is asked to do the BFF (before first flight) or daily inspection. I am searching for a checklist for this release to service inspection and would appreciate any legal references ito the accountability of any person releasing the machine to service.

(I know I am using 3 terms here loosely, but in my experience various companies use different names for the inspection at the end of a day, releasing a machine for the next day, or the early morning check before a suitably qualified person certifies the Technical Log that the helicopter is serviceable for the days flights...)

Much appreciated!
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Old 21st Feb 2018, 13:15
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Assuming you are in EASA land (and most others) it will be in your Maintenance Programme.
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Old 21st Feb 2018, 14:08
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If you don't have a Maintenance Programme then it will be in Chapter 5 of the Approved Maintenance Manual. Plus , of course any extra requirements from your Airworthiness Authority.

Sq
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Old 21st Feb 2018, 17:41
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May not be applicable in the case of the 130 but the 350 family normally has

BFF - Before first flight

TA - Turn around

ALF - After last flight

Pretty sure it is in the RFM
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Old 21st Feb 2018, 22:26
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Originally Posted by aheoe26104 View Post
I have to convince management about the accountability (ies) when a pilot is asked to do the BFF (before first flight) or daily inspection. I am searching for a checklist for this release to service inspection and would appreciate any legal references ito the accountability of any person releasing the machine to service.
Without knowing where you operate can not offer any specific information. However, from the standpoint of legal accountability prior to flight, that should be listed in the aviation regulations you operate under. Under the FAA, the person who is accountable varies depending on the type of operation (Part 91 vs Part 135) and the specific rules they follow.

As for a checklist, the H130 should have this in the Rotorcraft Flight Manual listed under "Pre-flight Check."
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Old 22nd Feb 2018, 10:43
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Be a bit careful here folks.

The BFF on the 350 family is very cursory and assumes that you have done the ALF which is the biggie.

A few people have come unstuck from not doing all the inspections.

Everybody just gets to the "pre-flight" page and thinks they have it covered - not so.

The ALF makes more sense anyway - commercially why would you land and walk away and leave a potentially unserviceable aircraft
sitting there only to find out when you did a pre-flight the next time you needed it?

An offence that would get you sacked at one operator in the past - loss of revenue when you could have had it repaired?

The legal accountability is the fact that I am pretty sure it is Section 4 which is "approved data" hence.................
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Old 22nd Feb 2018, 19:23
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Originally Posted by RVDT View Post
The legal accountability is the fact that I am pretty sure it is Section 4 which is "approved data" hence.................
You're correct everyone needs to be careful, but legal accountability is not dictated by OEM documentation regardless if "approved" or not, at least with the various CAA systems I'm familiar with. Regulations dictate that accountability.

For example, if this H130 was private under FAA Part 91 a "preflight/daily inspection" is not a specific regulatory requirement. Determining the aircraft airworthy is required (91.7(b) which can be accomplished by using the RFM checklist, a checklist you developed, or any other means.

Since the OP is talking releases and signatures I believe he is asking for info more inline with Air Taxi ops. This can change the entire context of the answer. With most Aerospat/Eurocopter/Airbus products the Daily Checks are also included in the OEM maintenance program which is different than say Bell.

To still use the FAR example, if the H130 was under Part 135 the BFF, TA, ALF checks fall under the regulatory required maintenance program and now require a signature. Bell, for instance, keeps their Pre-flight/Daily check in the RFM separate from the maintenance program.

However, most US 135 ops will include a signed Daily Check and signature for all types as part of their maintenance program. But even with a signed "daily" in the book does not release the pilot from the accountability to 91.7(b).

It can become even more complex depending on ownership, country and CAA. I think before we confuse the OP even more, maybe he'll report back with some additional info.
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Old 25th Feb 2018, 08:30
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Thanks everyone, after consulting with our technical department, we received the checklists containing the BFF, TAC and ALF. These checklists are not in the RFM and when you sit at home in the evening, you resort to the web..... (Maybe I should say sorry...) But with the checklists in hand, we are able to see what it is we are signing for (certifying) and as a company will be able to navigate this little matter. MUCH appreciated for all your comments. Fly safe!
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