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Dual National UK/US - options for training?

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Dual National UK/US - options for training?

Old 6th Jun 2017, 14:48
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Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Surrey
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Dual National UK/US - options for training?

Hi all,

My first post, I've spent some time reading through the relevant threads however I would really appreciate your views based on my individual circumstances.

I'm 29, work in IT, and have decided to commit to a long term goal of mine in working towards a career change as a helicopter pilot.

In summary, the financing element would be largely manageable based on the costs which are often referenced in these forums - that I suppose is the easy part.

I am a dual national, holding both UK and US citizenship, which presents a question around potential training providers and locations. Is there general consensus around whether the UK or US offers the best training environment? I'm thinking the main elements to consider are upfront costs, term of training, job prospects and any transferability.

A couple of other questions I have would be:

Is it possible to continue my full-time employment in IT whilst training? I'm unsure how sustainable this might be. Given I'm currently based in the UK, should I embark on training in the US, I would also aim to seek new employment alongside.

The military element. I'm actually quite happy to consider this route as an alternative, however I note from the UK side our RAF appear to place an upper age restriction for new recruits at 25 years old. Any input into this would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance for your comments.
Antse7en is offline  
Old 7th Jun 2017, 04:58
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Join Date: Oct 2012
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I think, by far the best option for you is to train in the USA: it's cheaper, you can build experience faster while working as an instructor and then move on to more challenging jobs in a shorter amount of time.
Other advantages from the FAA system include a lot less bureaucratic nonsense and restrictive regulation that ultimately will make it easier for a young guy to break in to the industry.
But remember It's still tough in the beginning for various reasons.
You can eventually return to EASA land but it's better if you have a few thousand hours before you do so.
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Old 7th Jun 2017, 05:15
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Join Date: Nov 2000
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Do you intend to work in Europe? If not, don't bother with EASA. If yes, what haihio said. Training wise, Canada is an option, with God's frozen people - you only need 100 hours for the CPL there.

Phil
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Old 7th Jun 2017, 07:25
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As someone who has done exactly what you are proposing, and have been both successful and lucky (Camp Freddie's decision tree), if you feel you must have a career in aviation, I'd say go fixed wing. Much better risk vs return odds. There are many experienced unemployed helicopter pilots knocking around who can't find work. What work is it you think you will do? (Applies to the UK).

If you have the option to live and work in the US, then that might be a feasible alternative then. Bigger market, lots more options, cheaper entry costs...
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Old 7th Jun 2017, 18:24
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Join Date: Jul 2007
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2's up with tu154. US FW is the route I would choose at the moment, but it depends if you are absolutely set on RW. Just my 2 cents.
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Old 8th Jun 2017, 14:13
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Thanks for the replies.

US fixed wing route is an interesting point. What are the typical entry and training requirements? If somebody can point me towards an online resource that would be great.

I like the self-funding element of rotary, and effectively setting your own pace. In addition there are no entry considerations like you would face applying to an airline as a trainee pilot. The main reason I mention this is because I do not have a degree - often a prerequisite. This has not been an issue in my career thus far given my journey from development apprentice through to IT leadership.

If there were a similar path which could be taken in the US for fixed wing I would definitely consider it.

Thanks
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Old 8th Jun 2017, 17:00
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Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: USA
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Originally Posted by Antse7en View Post
Thanks for the replies.

US fixed wing route is an interesting point. What are the typical entry and training requirements? If somebody can point me towards an online resource that would be great.

I like the self-funding element of rotary, and effectively setting your own pace. In addition there are no entry considerations like you would face applying to an airline as a trainee pilot. The main reason I mention this is because I do not have a degree - often a prerequisite. This has not been an issue in my career thus far given my journey from development apprentice through to IT leadership.

If there were a similar path which could be taken in the US for fixed wing I would definitely consider it.

Thanks
The three wholly owned regional airlines of American Airlines (Envoy, Piedmont and PSA) are all hiring guys with minimum time and offer a contractual flow throw to mainline AA. You also get full mainline travel benefits.

I recently made the jump to envoy after 15 years flying helicopters and haven't looked back. PM me if you want to know more.
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Old 9th Jun 2017, 11:13
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Hi Havick.

Have PM'd you.

Thanks to those who've offered their thoughts.
Antse7en is offline  
Old 9th Jun 2017, 13:24
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Hi Havick.

Have PM'd you.

Thanks to those who've offered their thoughts.
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Old 9th Jun 2017, 17:31
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Join Date: Apr 2003
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Originally Posted by Antse7en View Post
Hi Havick.

Have PM'd you.

Thanks to those who've offered their thoughts.
Never got any PM
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Old 9th Jun 2017, 17:56
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Join Date: May 2012
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Any options to train in the US?
Carpenterfish is offline  
Old 9th Jun 2017, 23:10
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Originally Posted by havick View Post
Never got any PM
I think I may have emailed you using a separate function? Let me know if you don't have it.
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Old 10th Jun 2017, 14:10
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Join Date: Apr 2003
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Originally Posted by Antse7en View Post
I think I may have emailed you using a separate function? Let me know if you don't have it.
Nope no email did you send a private message on here?
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