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Bristow S76 Ditched in Nigeria today Feb 3 2016

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Bristow S76 Ditched in Nigeria today Feb 3 2016

Old 10th Feb 2016, 21:54
  #101 (permalink)  

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Tragedy

212man/Nigel Osborn,

I was the M.P. of Eket when C.B. flew BIQ into the ground next to the QIT.

He had just requested (and been given) work-over, which was prevalent at the time so he could put down a deposit on a Porsche GT3. He was over the moon about it.

Despite some CRM issues manifesting themselves from time to time he was a more than competent pilot and never complained about an extra programme, late finishes etc, as was often the case at Eket in the days of 6 badly MOBIL managed 412s.

Nobody saw that "accident" coming, including the very experienced Captain who was rostered to fly with him that day, and who also frequents this forum.

The NCAA and AIB reports glossed over a lot of information which was readily available at the time. That oversight was entirely theirs, nothing to do with Bristow.

Subsequent reports appear to be much more thorough, impartial and draw upon external technology/knowledge where appropriate. I trust this one will be too.

Just my two penneth.

NEO

Last edited by Nigerian Expat Outlaw; 10th Feb 2016 at 21:58. Reason: Bad Grammar
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Old 11th Feb 2016, 04:44
  #102 (permalink)  
 
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More of an enquiry than a possible cause contribution.

One operator used Dexron oil in the MGB in accordance with the 76 manuals, which was OK in the usual temperate climate, but when the OAT got up the MGB pressure would plummet into the basement, below flyable limits.

Dexron was an oil originally developed for car automatic transmissions. The operator used it because it was one third the price of the alternative Mobil Jet which was used in the engines.

Lab tests following low pressure incidents showed that the oil passed all tests, and the theory was that the oil in passing through the jets was subject to shearing stresses that chopped the long chain molecules into shorter chains. I’d have thought that would show up in the viscosity tests, but apparently not.

Has anybody else experience with Dexron?
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Old 11th Feb 2016, 05:27
  #103 (permalink)  
 
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Geoffers

You are so out of touch - I suggest you do some research on line and find the information about the run dry tests on the AW139 gearbox.
Right, it will run 30 minutes with absolutely NO OIL.

I'm sure that's true, but .... you go first, squire

About 200 nm offshore in the North Sea at night ought to do it.

Last edited by oleary; 11th Feb 2016 at 05:38.
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Old 11th Feb 2016, 05:52
  #104 (permalink)  
 
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About 200 nm offshore in the North Sea at night ought to do it.
I suspect it would, since that's probably about 60 mins past the certification.....

It is not meant to be able to take you home from anywhere, but it is absolutely guaranteed and tested to take you farther than the 9 mins of a S92 MGB.
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Old 11th Feb 2016, 05:59
  #105 (permalink)  
 
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Geoffers

From here: http://www.ainonline.com/aviation-ne...rd-helicopters

Giuseppe Gasparini, head of transmission systems design and development at AgustaWestland, said when asked:

Q: What does the 30-minute run-dry requirement really mean?

A: I prefer to say “Loss of Lubrication,” or LoL, and not “run dry” or “run without oil”; we are demonstrating the capability of the gearbox to operate and transmit torque after the loss of most of its original lubricant when the oil is suddenly lost, but some residual lubricant is still inside the gearbox.
Like I said earlier, mate .... you go first

Last edited by oleary; 11th Feb 2016 at 06:32.
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Old 11th Feb 2016, 06:31
  #106 (permalink)  
 
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outwest

Interesting that your latest gen rocket doesn't have the run dry (which ain't really "run dry") capability of my 50 year old SK61.

The N model had something called emergency lube. It consisted of an overlarge transmission sump designed such that the bottom part (5 gallons I believe) could only be accessed by a little electrical pump. So, you can piss all the oil out (happened to me in the Beaufort with a frozen vent) and when the pressure drops below a set value (8 psi as I recall) the pump comes on a lubricates the critical bits.

This system has been proven many times to last a lot longer than 30 minutes. Some claim it will go 3 hours but I don't think I would want to try that
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Old 11th Feb 2016, 06:51
  #107 (permalink)  
 
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This system has been proven many times to last a lot longer than 30 minutes.

Well my friend I flew the 61 for 22 years, also in the Beaufort so we may even have flown together at one time so I think I know that a/c pretty well. She is a fine old ship, but that emerg lube was to lube the Babbitt bearings so that the whole a/c did not become a magnesium fueled fire ball within seconds of the Babbitts running dry. It was never intended or advertised as a "run dry" MGB.

Really? Many times? Can you give some examples?

I know of the incident off the East Coast where a T fitting broke and pumped ALL the oil overboard, even the emergency lube sump. That machine was ditched.

As much as I love the 61 and have great respect for it, in a loss of MGB oil I'll take a 139 any day.
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Old 11th Feb 2016, 07:20
  #108 (permalink)  
 
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outwest

OKX flew most of the way back to shore (about 80 nm as I recall with nothing but emergency lube. When Jimmy decided to put it in the water it was still running fine but very hot.

In my Beaufort example I was only about 10 minutes out so we just turned around and came back to Tuk (~20 min total). I'll find some other examples tomorrow.

As much as I love the 61 and have great respect for it, in a loss of MGB oil I'll take a 139 any day.
No doubt, she is a fine rocket - but she ain't "run dry" either - which was my point from the very beginning. See post #105.
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Old 11th Feb 2016, 07:39
  #109 (permalink)  
 
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If you check the facts on OKX it eventually ran completely out of oil, including the emerg lube sump. That was what lead to the removal of the T fitting that originally supplied oil to the torque meter.

The 139 is certified for 30 min after complete loss of oil and actually tested well beyond that so I'm not sure why you insist on saying it is not.

Regardless, I can see I'm beating a dead horse here so lets get this thread back to the 76 ditching in Nigeria.

Cheerio
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Old 11th Feb 2016, 09:11
  #110 (permalink)  
 
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Subsequent reports appear to be much more thorough, impartial and draw upon external technology/knowledge where appropriate. I trust this one will be too
Yes, which was what I was trying to imply in my earlier post - they have clearly become a different organisation than they previously were.
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Old 11th Feb 2016, 12:55
  #111 (permalink)  
 
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"Run dry" is simply a common term for losing oil pressure or volume. The MGB still has residual oil in it. When they tested the 139, it was run to operating temp, then the oil was dumped. Power was reduced to max endurance (the same thing the crew would do) and run well in excess of 30 minutes without any significant damage to the parts.

For those who want even better capability for extended "run dry" operation, the 139 now has an option for a configuration which is standard on the 189. An "emergency" reservoir on each side which will continue to provide minimal lubrication to the input module area (21,000 rpm) until they are empty. Pretty foolproof. No pumps or T-fittings required. That configuration increases the "run dry" time to 50 minutes. Proven in testing.
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Old 11th Feb 2016, 14:05
  #112 (permalink)  
 
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I haven't been around here for 18 months or so. It's taken me a while to read this thread. Lots of nasty and not really relevant stuff. Oh, and massive drift to try to become a run dry gearbox thread.

Anyway, no MGB or other systems to blame here. Just a case of mistaken identity.

Last edited by industry insider; 11th Feb 2016 at 14:16.
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Old 11th Feb 2016, 15:09
  #113 (permalink)  
 
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Just a case of mistaken identity.
Care to elaborate?
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Old 11th Feb 2016, 15:18
  #114 (permalink)  
 
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Sure pilonrock. Divine intervention like 5N-BMM incident.

"Following the lack of proper emergency procedures, which
led to some utterances in the cabin such as: "This door should
open in Jesus name, open in Jesus name" (CVR) The door was
jammed due to the severity of the impact."

Keep up the good work..
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Old 11th Feb 2016, 15:35
  #115 (permalink)  
 
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Crews in Nigeria have been told the reason for the ditching, but have also been told that they can't share it. I would assume, as wrong as assuming might be, that if it had in any way been airframe related, MGB or otherwise, the info would have been shared...and not just Bristow S-76s would have been grounded.
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Old 11th Feb 2016, 16:20
  #116 (permalink)  
 
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5NBQJ departed PH that morning with the original plan to ferry the helicopter to Lagos. 2 crew on board. Once en route crew were asked if they could route via the ERHA to pick up pax and bring them to Lagos. They did, but did not do the proper fuel calculations. 20 mins or so after departing the ERHA with a full load of pax and still far from shore they realized their fuel situation and the fact that they were not going to make it. They decided to "land on water" before the engines would run out of fuel.
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Old 11th Feb 2016, 17:03
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Bristow Press Release 10th Feb 2016

NIGERIA, (February 10, 2016) - Bristow Helicopters (Nigeria) Limited has provided additional information following the February 3, 2016, precautionary landing by one of its helicopters.

On February 3, 2016, shortly after 10 a.m. local time, the crew of Bristow S76C++ helicopter 5N-BQJ elected to make a precautionary landing of the aircraft on water while en-route from an offshore location to Lagos. After landing, the crew assisted nine passengers to board the life rafts directly from the cabin. The aircraft was recovered quickly and is now in the custody of the Nigerian Accident Investigation Bureau (NAIB).

With assistance from other assets in the vicinity, including those of the Lagos State Emergency Management Agency (LASEMA), The Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency (NIMASA), National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) and the offshore Marine Mutual Aid group, all onboard were safely returned to shore by 1700 the same day.

“I have personally thanked the crew and commended them highly for performing a well-executed precautionary landing and ensuring the safety of those onboard, which is of absolute and paramount importance to Bristow,” said Duncan Moore, Managing Director of Bristow Helicopters (Nigeria) Limited. “We also owe a huge debt of gratitude to the emergency response and rescue agencies, and countless others for their swift call to action. They have our utmost respect, admiration and gratitude.

“Bristow’s flight training programs are in compliance with the regulatory requirements of the Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority (NCAA) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and provide comprehensive training for these types of scenarios. Our flight training programs are also designed in coordination with the aircraft manufacturer and we follow their recommendations for training our crews to operate the aircraft.”

Tolu Olubajo, Bristow Nigeria’s Director of Nigerian Affairs, said, “In recent years Bristow has trained more than 150 national pilots and 130 national engineers, and we firmly hope to be able to maintain this momentum. Bristow Helicopters was incorporated in Nigeria in 1969 and has long demonstrated its commitment to supporting Nigeria’s energy industry and local content policies. The all Nigerian crew of this aircraft received their ab-initio training at Bristow Academy in Titusville, Florida."

Alhamdu Haruna, Bristow Helicopters (Nigeria) Limited’s Quality & Safety Manager, said, “Bristow is cooperating fully with the Nigerian Accident Investigation Bureau (NAIB) as part of the process to establish the sequence events and probable cause leading to the precautionary landing. We’re also engaging fully with the Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority as they undertake their review of the S-76C series of helicopters at our operation. Like all airlines, Bristow is subject to regular and detailed regulatory oversight and welcomes the review that the NCAA is currently undertaking and will act quickly and decisively on any recommendations or directives forthcoming.”

Bristow remains confident in the S-76 series of aircraft. The helicopter has an enviable safety record spanning many decades with over 6.5 million flight hours to date.

Safety remains Bristow’s number one core value and our Target Zero safety culture underpins this commitment.
A magnificent example of management verbiage: it actually says nothing new at all.

Last edited by Mel Effluent; 11th Feb 2016 at 17:05. Reason: Highlighting quote
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Old 11th Feb 2016, 17:09
  #118 (permalink)  
 
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tgvbhy15

Rumor - 'a currently circulating story or report of uncertain or doubtful truth'. 'Gossip, hearsay, talk, tittle-tattle, speculation, word'. This is a rumor ‘chat-shop’ and rumor can be hearsay but often is or should be laced with a foundation of truth. What you have just spouted is not only untrue, it’s absolute bullshit. If you intend to spin a rumor, take some time to fact find so it it is laced with a decency of truth or facts. Fuel or it's planning has nothing to do with this incident and the aircraft never departed from PH. It’ll be better we stick to the ‘run dry’ debate, it’s at least academic as opposed to the rubbish insinuations and causative factors being espoused. I'll be better served reading the National Enquirer, at least some stories they publish are true!
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Old 11th Feb 2016, 17:10
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megan post # 102


Dexron III has been in use on CHC S76 series helicopters for over 30 years, most common brand we use today is Mobil 1 ATF . see from the C++ manual on approved oils for the main gear box ( applies the same to intermediate and tail).
I have been with the S76 in very cold climates and very hot I have never experienced any problems using this oil. In this many years of operating many S76´s all over the world I think is long enough to say it works just fine and the gearboxes normally make TBO and no defects are being reported by the overhaul or repair shops due to using this oil.


My only complaint is the smell of the oil is quite strong.


Lubricating oil, DODPRF-85734 (preferred)


MIL-L-23699,
MIL-L-21260,
Type I, Grade
30, or
Dexron III, ATF




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Old 11th Feb 2016, 17:17
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'With assistance from other assets in the vicinity, including those of the Lagos State Emergency Management Agency (LASEMA), The Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency (NIMASA), National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) and the offshore Marine Mutual Aid group, all onboard were safely returned to shore by 1700 the same day.'

They suddenly forgot all the assistance that Caverton provided. Sad, they were very grateful on the Bristow homepage.

“We would like to thank Mobil Producing Nigeria Unlimited, Caverton Helicopters Limited, Chevron Nigeria Limited, Nigerian Agip Oil Company, West African Ventures, Shell Nigeria Exploration and Production Company Limited, The Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority (NCAA), The Nigerian Accident Investigation Bureau, The Federal Airport Authority of Nigeria and The Nigerian Airspace Management Authority, for their immediate support in retrieving the passengers and crew from the inflatable life raft deployed by the helicopter."
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