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Helicopter crash near M1

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Helicopter crash near M1

Old 28th Feb 2015, 23:23
  #21 (permalink)  

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Don't know about being forced to become a helicopter pilot Shy, but I've had to be shoe-horned into a 22 …. well, I did have a winter coat on
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Old 1st Mar 2015, 00:25
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'We had only been flying for about three minutes when I noticed the warning light was flashing. Either there was a problem with an engine or the propeller blades, but we started going into auto-rotation and made a crash landing.
Are we sure this bloke is a qualified helicopter pilot???

Perhaps we 'robbo-bashers' have been wrong along, the aircraft is fine - it's just the f*ckwits flying them that are the problem

It rather looks like he managed to introduce the blades to the tail-boom at some point during his attempt at an EOL.

I don't actually care one way or another if 'ex-military' guys slate the Robbos. It would just 'appear' that the people who slate them are ex mil who have never had to train and hour build in one.
maybe it's just because we have had the luxury of flying a real helicopter and can tell the difference.
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Old 1st Mar 2015, 03:37
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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Danger

Well [email protected] I'm not exMil, with 25 years Civil flying I can tell You that the Crapinson Flimsicopter is a DEATH TRAP & belongs at the local dump, all them every last one of the junk
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Old 1st Mar 2015, 04:38
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'We had only been flying for about three minutes when I noticed the warning light was flashing. Either there was a problem with an engine or the propeller blades, but we started going into auto-rotation and made a crash landing.
Crab....you beat me too it......
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Old 1st Mar 2015, 06:55
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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"Either there was a problem with an engine or the propeller blades"

So let me get this straight - he was flying a Robinson twin engined aeroplane?
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Old 1st Mar 2015, 07:40
  #26 (permalink)  

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Careful guys, have you seen his hat?
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Old 1st Mar 2015, 08:36
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The usual condescending posts from those flying nice twin engined helicopters and never having to pay for it

Of course commercial,military,offshore and police helicopters never crash and when they do the finger is never pointed at the pilot.

It may lack creature comforts but the Robbo does what it says on the tin.

I'd like to see a few of the regulars on here try to muster livestock low level for hours on end in the Australian outback in OAT's of over 37' wearing shorts and a t shirt

I did my training in an R22 in those temps,without doors, and with a muster pilot.

The combination was excellent and if you can fly the Robbo then you can fly anything.

However some flying experts might find it lacks headroom!

Last edited by Romeopapa; 1st Mar 2015 at 09:00.
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Old 1st Mar 2015, 09:03
  #28 (permalink)  

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I think overall on PPRuNe, the majority of the comments are aimed at the handling, not the type.

Anyway...

I'd like to see a few of the regulars on here try to muster livestock low level for hours on end in the Australian outback in OAT's of over 37
... would we have to keep within certifications?



It may lack creature comforts but the Robbo does what it says on the tin.
...and more

"The R22 has been the most popular model for these types of operations, but owners and operators need to fully appreciate the stresses placed on aircraft during mustering operations, and the characteristics of aerial mustering operations, which may be quite different the type of flying for which the type originally received certification."

http://www.atsb.gov.au/media/29947/b20040292.pdf

HeliHub Accidents
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Old 1st Mar 2015, 09:12
  #29 (permalink)  
 
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Sid

I am sure we all dream of being expert hero pilots such as yourself but in this case the guy appears to have done a successful auto and the skids dug in to the soft ground.

The mud on the nose suggests it pitched forwards, blades appear to have sliced of the tail and flipped it on its side.

I was taught any accident you walk away from is a bonus.

Chinese whispers tend to distort what a person says and what is reported.

This pilot did a good job.

Please give him some credit

Have you published any flying instruction manuals by any chance?

As for the handling have you ever heard the saying a poor workman blames his tools?

I think a holiday on a sheep station in the outback might show you what can be done with a small helicopter. Bring plenty of toilet paper.
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Old 1st Mar 2015, 09:30
  #30 (permalink)  

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RP;
Sid

I am sure we all dream of being expert hero pilots such as yourself but in this case the guy appears to have done a successful auto and the skids dug in to the soft ground.

The mud on the nose suggests it pitched forwards, blades appear to have sliced of the tail and flipped it on its side.

I was taught any accident you walk away from is a bonus.

Chinese whispers tend to distort what a person says and what is reported.

This pilot did a good job.

Please give him some credit

Have you published any flying instruction manuals by any chance?

As for the handling have you ever heard the saying a poor workman blames his tools?

I think a holiday on a sheep station in the outback might show you what can be done with a small helicopter. Bring plenty of toilet paper.
Hmmm, I defend ex-mil pilots against chip on shoulder-ers such as yourself, I comment that the pilot might have 'a past' to be wary of when making comment (and mention the boathouse door colour, that's the clue!), inform someone of a safety alert, comment on how I need a shoehorn to get into a Robbo, remind people of 'the boathouse related hat' and my last post makes the point that most of the comments made here are about handling and not specifically the type ... not once have I criticised the pilot ...


... yet you feel warranted to give me your tirade of a post ....



I'm no expert hero pilot, far from it, but as it happens I'm now off to the boathouse
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Old 1st Mar 2015, 09:39
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Combine the cheapest and least forgiving product out there with the pool of least experience pilots and low currency and what do you do you expect.

I am surprised having recently arrived from the fixed wing world that minimum currency in a helicopter is just two hours (including a checkout) per year, that seems altogether to little. No matter what machine you fly commercially you are being checked every six months and of course flying (hopefully) more regularly.

In my very limited time on helicopters I must admit that I enjoyed my 22 time but she was the most challenging and least forgiving to fly.
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Old 1st Mar 2015, 09:55
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Good point VP.

As you know the Robbo is not forgiving but because it can bite it makes an excellent trainer.

Decades ago a friend of mine was doing his rotary conversion at the same time as me but in a
Hughes 269.

Very nice more stable and easier to fly than the R22.

I still recall the first time I flew a B208 and it felt like being in a Rolls Royce.

Its a long time since I did my helicopter training but in those days in Australia we did full on to the ground autos and hot and heavy take offs.

I believe there is no longer a need to do full on autos in some parts of the world.

My instructor had a party trick where he did a full stop auto in a 47 then lifted to do a 360 turn before putting it down again.
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Old 1st Mar 2015, 10:20
  #33 (permalink)  
 
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low level for hours on end in the Australian outback in OAT's of over 37' wearing shorts and a t shirt
well protected against any post-crash fire then!!! I presume you haven't seen a burns victim up close.

Would love to see the pre-flight performance calculations before the 'hours at low level' mustering and I'm sure everyone keeps within their MAP limits at all times.

All very heroic and impressive I'm sure but when you start doing it the dark with people shooting at you I might have some respect.
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Old 1st Mar 2015, 10:37
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I was advised on the first day of flying a helicopter in Australia that if I really wanted to be safe then the best place was terra firma.

Crab....

Are you suggesting there is a market in the outback for Nomex suits,epaulettes and bone domes?

Take a look at Vertical Freedoms wonderful thread and give me your opinion of his flying attire.

As for bullets...thats a risk if you join the forces.

Silso...

I see you looking down your long nose at the R22.

Perhaps if you can manage to load the ego onboard the airframe you might discover something of a challenge in comparison to just sitting in a chair and playing with the electronic kit.

Last edited by Romeopapa; 1st Mar 2015 at 10:53.
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Old 1st Mar 2015, 11:32
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So glad this thread didnt descend into a slanging match. Interesting to see the various sides taken and by the experiences and backgrounds.

Anyway, yes i'd maybe be more likely to check things more carefully than I did when I was younger.
Sid, I do appreciate your input really.

My final word is that flown sensibly within the limitations, the R22/44 is probably quite a safe machine, but explore beyond its limits and you may well be bitten, if not worse. It has served many Rotorheads well, enabling some of us to enter into the world of Commercial helicopter flying, and for that i'm thankful. I could never have afforded it otherwise and was never lucky enough to get into the military.
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Old 1st Mar 2015, 12:00
  #36 (permalink)  
 
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Helimutt..

The Robbo is fine given its cost base.

Most of its critics have either not flown it on a regular basis or never flown it because they were lucky enough to get their training free of charge.

If some of the nomex suited and booted brigade had to fly fire break work in Oz I am sure they would soon become desk jockeys

Personally I prefer to drive my own car (and aircraft) than chauffeur someone else's limo
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Old 1st Mar 2015, 12:19
  #37 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Romeopapa View Post
Helimutt..

The Robbo is fine given its cost base.

Most of its critics have either not flown it on a regular basis or never flown it because they were lucky enough to get their training free of charge.

If some of the nomex suited and booted brigade had to fly fire break work in Oz I am sure they would soon become desk jockeys
You cannot fly fire ops in Oz without being one of the nomex suited, booted and bone domed brigade; the agencies will not allow it. Your trolling here is on a par with your pontificating about police operations: pitiful.

A day at Avalon with me would have been far more beneficial to your well-being than making it up as you go along on Rotorheads.
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Old 1st Mar 2015, 12:58
  #38 (permalink)  
 
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If you can wind your neck in for a moment John let me explain.

I have a property in Darlington Hills near Perth and have a number of friends around the area who all contribute to taking pictures of the firebreaks we have to have finished every December.

All done with a Robbo from Jandakot. No doors and no suits just a couple of us taking pictures to cover our backs.

All a long way from the UK.

Now lets get back to the thread and perhaps you can suggest how you would have landed on a pristine golf course in England instead of a ploughed field when the lycoming quit

Give this guy a break please.

As for suggestions of trolling re police ops.

I post links to all stories which are recent plus the UK police twitter every day.

Last edited by Romeopapa; 1st Mar 2015 at 13:08.
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Old 1st Mar 2015, 13:45
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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Which clearly translates to 'I have enough money to own my own helicopter and I can do what I want with it - I don't have to listen to aviation professionals!'
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Old 1st Mar 2015, 14:02
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You know nothing about the circumstances of this forced landing and neither do I.

However you are smug enough to suggest a civilian pilot of 20 years experience who carried out a successful auto where he and his passenger walked away was not up to your standard?

When did you last do a full auto with the blade inertia of an R22 in to a wet ploughed field
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