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Downwind approaches

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Downwind approaches

Old 21st Sep 2023, 17:44
  #81 (permalink)  
 
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I agree that solo builds confidence and maybe there is a place for solo circuits pre-PPL test, but letting a student blast off on cross country flights through controlled airspace, and then the instructor getting in the sh*t with the CAA if the student messes up just doesn't seem right.
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Old 21st Sep 2023, 18:38
  #82 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by hargreaves99
I agree that solo builds confidence and maybe there is a place for solo circuits pre-PPL test, but letting a student blast off on cross country flights through controlled airspace, and then the instructor getting in the sh*t with the CAA if the student messes up just doesn't seem right.
Well, on those solo flights, I was only allowed to go to places I'd already been to with my instructor, so there was far less a risk of "messing up".
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Old 21st Sep 2023, 22:01
  #83 (permalink)  
 
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​​​​ and quick stops (aside from teaching coordination) are just fun!
Yes, the handbrake turn of the helicopter world.
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Old 22nd Sep 2023, 18:41
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Originally Posted by MightyGem
Yes, the handbrake turn of the helicopter world.
Even better when accompanied by the words “Whoa, Whoa Big Fella!” a la “Lone Ranger”.
A good skill to learn because when you need it - you may need it bad!
Yes they are fun.
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Old 23rd Sep 2023, 08:07
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Or Yosemite Sam's 'Whoa camel, whoa, I say WHOA'
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Old 23rd Sep 2023, 22:13
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Originally Posted by [email protected]
Or Yosemite Sam's 'Whoa camel, whoa, I say WHOA'
You win for that one!
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Old 26th Sep 2023, 08:33
  #87 (permalink)  
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A textbook example of “Settling with power”…..
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Old 26th Sep 2023, 10:29
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A classic - not enough power to do what the pilot thinks it should and very probably no consideration pre-flight of HOGE + thrust margin power requirement.

Nr decays as he pulls, TR loses effectiveness due to lower speed, undemanded yaw and an overpitched arrival at the air/ground interface. Lucky it didn't roll over.
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Old 26th Sep 2023, 20:05
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Nice crash 👍🏼
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Old 27th Sep 2023, 00:47
  #90 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by ORAC
A textbook example of “Settling with power”…..
The report for anyone interested!

https://www.gov.uk/aaib-reports/aaib...eBF1VgOAg8BxEM
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Old 27th Sep 2023, 04:37
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Originally Posted by 206Fan
So, this is basically just like that other one not that long ago, where the A-star came in downwind using the wrong technique?
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Old 27th Sep 2023, 05:16
  #92 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by Robbiee
So, this is basically just like that other one not that long ago, where the A-star came in downwind using the wrong technique?
That investigation is ongoing!

https://www.tsb.gc.ca/eng/enquetes-i.../A23W0048.html


Last edited by 206Fan; 27th Sep 2023 at 07:49.
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Old 27th Sep 2023, 07:20
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I think the Canadian crash is more likely VRS since 350s are much more powerful than Robbos and you would expect HOGE performance to be available at the end of a sortie - and there is no evidence of overpitching unlike the Robbo crash where you can hear the Nr decay.

Perhaps a fine example of the difference between settling with power and VRS. The common factor being a downwind approach and trying to arrest a RoD with power.
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Old 27th Sep 2023, 21:09
  #94 (permalink)  

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Originally Posted by 206Fan
According to the report, the pilot had 108 hours TT.

The RAF’s basic helicopter course (Whirlwind 10 in my time) was 110 hours. Students would by then already have completed a basic flying course on the Jet Provost Mk3, of about the same length, and possibly another 35 hours or so on the JP5 before getting streamed to rotary. After the basic RW course they would go on to the twin engined Wessex 2, or 5 for another 35 hours before being presented with “Wings”. After that they would be required to complete the Operational Conversion Unit course before being posted to a squadron. They would need to complete a Combat Ready training syllabus and successfully pass a check ride after 6 months, before which they were very carefully monitored and supervised and often crewed up with an experienced crewman for very basic tasks, such as soldier emplaning and deplaning drills and air experience. They would not be allowed to self authorise until deemed experienced and competent to do so. If the individual didn’t pass the CR check and subsequently failed to do so after a short period of remedial training, *he would be required to surrender his entitlement to wear the “Wings” badge.

*I say “He” because at the time I went through training, females were disallowed to undertake pilot training.

For me, this puts “self auth” helicopter ownership at 108 hours into a quite different perspective.
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Old 28th Sep 2023, 09:30
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Agreed Shy, I probably had nearly 600 hours before being allowed to self auth for basic GH stuff.

Fortunately most GA PPLHs recognise their lack of experience and skills and approach aviation accordingly but there will always be a few who think they know better and believe their chequebooks bought them aviation God status.
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