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My dream - advice please (collective thread)

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My dream - advice please (collective thread)

Old 8th Mar 2019, 19:12
  #381 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 543
The search facility is a little bit old and throwing up responses from 2004 etc. 18 months etc.

In today's market what is the expected wait time from fATPL to first job?
airbourne is offline  
Old 30th Mar 2019, 18:37
  #382 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: uk
Posts: 3
Funding advice and training advice

Hello,

I am 34 in a week, from the UK and want to train to be a commercial pilot. I have worked in other careers in the past but nothing I have done has given me enough job satisfaction and I end up doing something else. I have worked in hospitality, as a hairdresser and as an outdoor education instructor (which I have a degree in). I do enjoy Outdoor ed but the pay is terrible, you would be lucky to earn 24k a year in a well paid job. I love travel and have been traveling for about 5 years now.
I worry that if I became a pilot I would get bored of it or would the job keep me interested? I would like to fly smaller aircraft's (such as the twin otter) as I would like to fly in more remote places.

Also i worry about funding. I have some savings at the moment (35000 GBP) but the modular training costs between 50-60k.Is it best to wait until I have all the funding before I start training in case I can not finish due to lack of funds or is it a good idea to get a loan for the last 20k or so? I would rather not wait another couple of years to save the extra money as I will be 36 before I start training. Also is it difficult to find a job as a new pilot? If I did get a loan I would need to start paying it back quite quickly so would need a job.

I wondered about becoming a flight instructor but I see its still more money than I have saved to do this so I am a bit stuck on what to do.

Any advice would be much appreciated, thank you

Steph
stephxox is offline  
Old 30th Mar 2019, 21:02
  #383 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 255
Originally Posted by stephxox View Post
Hello,

I am 34 in a week, from the UK and want to train to be a commercial pilot. I have worked in other careers in the past but nothing I have done has given me enough job satisfaction and I end up doing something else. I have worked in hospitality, as a hairdresser and as an outdoor education instructor (which I have a degree in). I do enjoy Outdoor ed but the pay is terrible, you would be lucky to earn 24k a year in a well paid job. I love travel and have been traveling for about 5 years now.
I worry that if I became a pilot I would get bored of it or would the job keep me interested? I would like to fly smaller aircraft's (such as the twin otter) as I would like to fly in more remote places.

Also i worry about funding. I have some savings at the moment (35000 GBP) but the modular training costs between 50-60k.Is it best to wait until I have all the funding before I start training in case I can not finish due to lack of funds or is it a good idea to get a loan for the last 20k or so? I would rather not wait another couple of years to save the extra money as I will be 36 before I start training. Also is it difficult to find a job as a new pilot? If I did get a loan I would need to start paying it back quite quickly so would need a job.

I wondered about becoming a flight instructor but I see its still more money than I have saved to do this so I am a bit stuck on what to do.

Any advice would be much appreciated, thank you

Steph
​​​​​​​Yes you will get bored of airline flying after the initial 1-2 years it's interesting but it will become repetitive and the novelty will wear off. It's a fantastic job but it's not all glamorous and fun a lot of downsides to flying for an airline, I would only consider doing it if you are really passionate about aviation and will do whatever it takes to be a pilot

You mentioned more remote flying and flying smaller airplanes, I think that would be quite enjoyable and interesting flying

I would strongly advise against getting any loans for the training, Getting a loan for type rating if an airline requires you to self fund it would be where I would draw the line because at least on a type rating for an airline you know you have a job waiting for you at the end of it

If I was you I would do a PPL while you're working and see whether flying is for you or not, if you want to continue keep saving and do ATPL in the mean time, You can do the ATPL over 2 years if you would like because the timer of 18 months to finish all exams only starts from the first exam you sit so you can spend as long as you want studying for exams initially

My advice to you is only get into aviation if you're dead set on being a pilot and don't just do it because you think it sounds cool or fun, Training isn't easy and there are many difficult days on the training, i've seen people pack it all in or lose motivation along the way so only the people dedicated really get through in the end especially on a modular course where there is no hand holding and it's all up to you to motivate yourself and work through the difficulties
Negan is offline  
Old 31st Mar 2019, 13:21
  #384 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: uk
Posts: 3
Thank you for your reply being very honest.

I didn't expect it to be glamorous to be honest, its not really what I look for in a job, job satisfaction is one of the key points as like I said, I get bored easily which is why I think smaller aircraft and more remote flying would suit me better. I have a trail lesson booked for next week and as you suggested I will go ahead with my PPL and see how I go from there.

I don't think it sounds cool or fun and its something I had not thought of doing before. I think it could be interesting and challenging. I recently was working in a very remote place and they had pilots there that worked on twin otters, dash 7 and the bazler BT-67 and i never knew about this side of aviation before. I figured pilots flew large aircraft's from airport to airport and if you flew remote you had to be in the forces or something, naive I know but I never really thought about it.

What are the major difficulties in becoming a pilot?

Thank again

Steph
stephxox is offline  
Old 15th Apr 2019, 14:19
  #385 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: waterskiing 2 miles behind the ac...
Posts: 12
Originally Posted by stephxox View Post

What are the major difficulties in becoming a pilot?
1. Hand-eye coordination - use your trial lesson to figure out if you have got it. Some people may have all the brains in the world but can't fly straight and level!
2. Mental arithmetic - you say you have a degree in PE, any maths in that? Can you do distance/speed/time problems while under pressure. Some people have all the hand-eye coordination but no mental maths ability!
3. Deep understanding of meteorology, aircraft tech and performance - lots of studying involved.
4. Resilience - can you bounce back after a good sortie, or a failed test flight?
5. Attitude - can you get on with all types of people? If not, can you compromise and learn to make the best of a bad pairing with a difficult Captain/Ops Manager?

These represent about 0.001% of the possible difficulties in becoming a professional pilot.

I was a military pilot for 5 years, then moved to a ground-based Ops job. I didn't even attempt the CPL/ATPL exams because I had started a family and just didn't want to fly for Lyin'Air or Sleazyjet. You must prioritise according to your age, commitments and cash!
Training Risky is offline  
Old 24th Apr 2019, 21:24
  #386 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 543
Type 2 Diabetes - UK & Ireland ONLY

So I am type 2 diabetic. Not insulin dependent. I take a couple of tablets a day. I have good blood sugar control.

Question is has anyone with type 2 diabetes gained their Class 1 medical and went on to the flying.

Plenty of posts about being a pilot and becoming diabetic but I am looking before the horse bolts!

The rules are different in the US and other countries so thats why I am asking about the UK & Ireland only.
airbourne is offline  
Old 24th Apr 2019, 22:29
  #387 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 255
Originally Posted by 2_Deck_Dash View Post
Hello,

Newbie here, regular poster over on Arrse / Rumration.

So here’s the story.

I’ve always always wanted to be a pilot. It’s all I can remember from a very young age. My parents took me to airshows every summer, I’d spend weekends at the RAF museum. As soon as I hit 13 I joined the ATC and did a fair few air experience flights in Bulldogs, Tutors plus a few cabbies in other bits and pieces.

Aged 16 reality hit home that my family weren’t really wealthy enough for me to hang around doing A levels and Uni. I went to a fairly shite comprehensive school and couldn’t wait to leave.

I tried to join the RAF but at the time they were only recruiting Police, Regiment and chefs.

So I ended up in he Navy as a weapons engineer. I figured the next best thing to flying aircraft would be shooting them down. Obviously I never got the chance to do that. I banged in 6 years having a jolly good time, seeing the world and learning a trade. Got a few cabbies in helicopters and back seat adventures in C130s.

Fast forward to now.

I’m 33, steady civvy job as an Incorporated Engineer (working towards Chartership). Decent salary of over 50k a year. Big pension if I stay with my current firm. Wife, house, 2 kids, dog etc.

Perfect domestic bliss. It’s all good except for one thing......

I’m bored shitless and deep down, I still just want to fly. Probably just a childish dream that I thought I’d grow out of, but I haven’t. I don’t hate my job, but I know deep down it’s not what I want to do for the next 34 years.

My son is 8 and I can tell he’s also got the bug. Same as I was at that age, he’s obsessed with planes. The best bit about going on holiday is the flight. He knows every commercial airliner there is just from the arrangement of the cockpit windows.

Seeing him like this and taking him to air shows and museums and what not has reignited the bug. Of course the difference with him is that I’ll be able to support him through flight school if that’s what he wants to do when the time comes.

I’m now seriously considering a career change. I’m probably still young enough, but I’m worried that I’m too far up the current career ladder to turn back.

I’ve got a bit of money stashed and could probably stretch to self funding a CPL. Of course the lack of income for the year or so I’m doing this would be hard to swallow but we’d get by.

I’d appreciate any thoughts from people who have been down this road, even if it’s just to say “don’t be stupid, stick with what you’ve got.”

So a few questions.

Realistically what sort of salary can I expect after training? How long before my course is paid for and I’m back up to earning what I earn now?

What’s the job market like after training? I’ve heard horror stories of people spending 100k to get their CPL and then being unemployable because they don’t have enough hours / experience.

Is there any funding / sponsorship available for people my age or is it all reserved for young thrusters straight out of uni?

Obviously I’m not stupid and I realise any job gets monotonous after a while, but this is something I feel like I’ll always regret if I don’t do it. I’d rather be bored driving a plane, than be bored driving a desk.

Any other advice more than welcome.

Many thanks in advance.
Salary for first year on average in Europe anywhere from 20-50k euro

Job market is the best it's ever been but there is a recession predicted to be hitting eventually may not happen or could happen tomorrow but there are warning signs now

funding and sponsorship is very competitive and most likely will go to the younger guys

Also budget for 2-3 years of no income if you're going to do this, this is aviation delays happen it will definitely be more than 1 year that you won't have an income

My advice to you looking at your situation, do a PPL locally while working and see how you get on, if you feel you want to take the next step after that then get started on ATPL exams distance learning and knuckle down

Go the modular route so you are flexible and can maintain the job just what I think anyway

Also yes it's entirely possible to spend 100k on the training and never get a job, it's not uncommon for it to happen and flying is a huge risk

and last but most importantly get a class 1 medical before you even decide to start training, without that you can never become a commercial pilot
Negan is offline  
Old 25th Apr 2019, 05:54
  #388 (permalink)  

de minimus non curat lex
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: sunny troon
Posts: 892
Although you are not too old, age isn't on your side and of course your primary concern must be for the family.
You need to nibble away at it.

1. Start down the PPL route with a Class Two medical. Your AME will know whether you qualify for a Class One. Obtain this by the time you obtain your PPL

DECISION TIME:
2. Head in the books with distant learning for the EASA exams

DECISION TIME:
3. CPL followed by FI part time keeping your well paid job or Potentially more risky CPL/IR + MCC route impacting finances & family stability.

4. One step at a time

parkfell is online now  
Old 26th Apr 2019, 18:47
  #389 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Lahore
Posts: 2
Flying career advice needed!

Hello everyone
I'm thinking of starting flying school this or next year but I get more confused the more i dig the info about flying.
I'm a Pakistani i can't get a flying job in EU,Getting a visa to fly in NA is almost impossible for a Pakistani without any connection in the states,My country has only one airline airline hiring and they require 1,000+ hours on A320 for F/o so that's out of the option,other airlines are on their way to bankruptcy,
i really want to pursue this career but if i do my nationality will not get me a job almost anywhere except a few places,I'm thinking of either going to ATP for 0-1500hrs course for FAA ATPL or L3 for iATPL or MPL for EASA ATPL but I'm not sure wether i should do it or ditch my lifelong dream..
Iris9er is offline  
Old 26th Apr 2019, 19:47
  #390 (permalink)  

de minimus non curat lex
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: sunny troon
Posts: 892
The MPL route is only available if you are attached/sponsored by an airline.

So age, academic qualifications and ability to pass a medical are important factors.

You might consider being employed in aviation on the ground first, and taking it from there?
parkfell is online now  
Old 27th Apr 2019, 05:32
  #391 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Lahore
Posts: 2
Originally Posted by parkfell View Post
Youu might consider being employed in aviation on the ground first, and taking it from there?
That's the problem, I'm not a First world national getting a work visa would be more difficult than getting a job.
My questions is are their any other options like CATHAY which takes new pilots regardless of their nationality,Or wether should i go for ATPL at all or wait join a University get a job work my way into getting a green card or blue card and then start flight training because if one can save up 500,000$ he'd get a US greencard or 250,000 for a belgium Blue card..
Iris9er is offline  
Old 8th May 2019, 13:43
  #392 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Europe
Posts: 5
Frustrated, lost, and a bit angry

Hi everyone,I'm posting here out of desperation, because I have no more ideas and I'm frustrated. I'd like some advice, options and opinions of my fellow aviators.The long story, short...
Background:

-always wanted to be a pilot (cliche, but true)-went to ERAU, but found out the week before classes started, that flight training costs were NOT a part of tuition (I had no parents to read the fine print or anything - obviously my 18 year old self missed something important).-transferred out of Riddle, worked towards a BA, started flying lessons - got up to 40 hours (inconsistently) & ran out of money.-got a BA-got a job at a flight school in the marketing dept., full-time, and was looking forward to discounted flight training - or at least being able to finally afford it. However I let my naive self be taken advantage of - was paid way under any normal rate for my job & the living area. Left after 3 months.

Where I'm at now (in Europe):

-got a masters degree & a decent paying job (work in an office full-time). Still want to do nothing but fly.-my finances: make about 44K before taxes, after all bills & everything, I'm left with about $1400 (thanks also to GF just moving in!)-got the ppl and also work at the flight school as a Radiotelephony instructor, I also get to ferry the plane to and from maintenance when needed - not much, but 30 min here and there is better than nothing.-43 years old, 1st class medical-taking ATPL classes (well, only 80 hours of classroom instruction are required for this program). I've got 17 big thick binders & the corresponding online question bank trainer as well as AviationExam App. But it's me alone to study & prep.-pre-tests (with 80%), need to be taken by Nov. 3, before I can take the actual real tests (75% = passing).-In about 3 subjects I'm at or near 70%, with the others, I'm between 50 & 65% (flight planning and mass & balance I haven't even touched yet, aside from the classroom stuff).

The dilemma:-I feel like I don't have enough time to study. I'm lucky if I can squeeze out an hour a day going through the question bank trainers. I'm seeing improvement, but it's very very slow and I've only touched on a few of the subjects.-I've been giving this my all, literally. All my money, most of my time and most of my effort. I study most every night after work, and on weekends for 2-4 hours...but it doesn't seem to be enough.-Just this week I've tried studying an hour or so before work, and just going in & staying later so work tiredness/stress won't affect my studying.

My thoughts:-maybe I should just quit - obviously the universe doesn't want me to be a pilot, because no matter what I do, bigger and bigger walls get put up in front of me! (But then again damnit, it's all I want and I've already put in so much)...-quit the ATPL, buy a plane, fly for fun

- cut my job hours in half (and pay and vacation time) - and gain extra time to study...

-other than that, I'm not sure what else I can do or what else there is to do...Like I said above, I'm very frustrated right now and feel like I'm running through mud and the faster I try to run, the more walls get thrown up in front of me.So, if anyone out there has some good advice or novel ideas, I'd really appreciate hearing it.
Isotope Toast is offline  
Old 19th May 2019, 09:11
  #393 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 1
Career switch (Europe)- advice

Hello everyone,

I know there are a lot of similar threads like these, but some advice would be very much appreciated.

So here's my situation:
  • Currently 24 years old
  • Just before I finished high school (i.e. age of 18 in Europe) I applied for a flight academy and passed all the selection tests. I could have started, but I did not. Why? They told me that during that time the industry was having a hard time and I would probably had to fly in Asia (Western countries were saturated with pilots). Furthermore I met a girl during my last year in high school and was afraid this would put a lot of pressure on our relationship. We're currently still together and got a very stable relationship.
  • Started a 5-year engineering study after high school and graduated a year ago.
  • I have been working in an engineering company for around a little less than a year. I'm making good money, but I feel this kind of job is not my passion and not something I want to do for the rest of my life. (I already felt that way during my studies to be honest, but continued because I did not know what to study else).
  • Therefore I'm considering again to go to a flight school in order to become a pilot in a 2-year track.

Could you guys please advise me on the next questions?
  1. Family life is important to me and my girlfriend made it clear that she does not want to move with me to another country assuming I would be an airline pilot, which I totally respect. I live in The Netherlands. Is it possible that you fly for let's say Lufthansa, you are based in Frankfurt, but live in Amsterdam and you would commute between these two cities? Is this something that occures frequently in Europe?
  2. Is there at this time a good chance I can start flying in a country in Europe (and commute between the Netherlands & this specific country)?
  3. Flying rosters like 5 days flying & 3 days off is fine. Are there also rosters (at e.g. low fair airliners) in which you depart and come back home at the same day?
  4. Would my engineering degree (civil, not in aerospace) help getting hired at an airline? Or do airliners only care about the amount of hours you have flown?

Being an airline pilot is still my dream job and during my studies & current career I felt I should be flying and persue my passion. Yet as you have probably mentioned my family has priority and I don't think I would be able to move to another country which is 10.000km away, leave everyone behind and see them like once every 3 months. So you can be very honest to me: is becoming an airline pilot something realistic considering I would be able to commute, yet not move to another country?

I have been breaking my head around this for quite a while and some advice of people in the aviation industry would helpful ;-).

Cheers
Highflyer2019 is offline  
Old 19th May 2019, 21:07
  #394 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 255
Originally Posted by Highflyer2019 View Post
Hello everyone,

I know there are a lot of similar threads like these, but some advice would be very much appreciated.

So here's my situation:
  • Currently 24 years old
  • Just before I finished high school (i.e. age of 18 in Europe) I applied for a flight academy and passed all the selection tests. I could have started, but I did not. Why? They told me that during that time the industry was having a hard time and I would probably had to fly in Asia (Western countries were saturated with pilots). Furthermore I met a girl during my last year in high school and was afraid this would put a lot of pressure on our relationship. We're currently still together and got a very stable relationship.
  • Started a 5-year engineering study after high school and graduated a year ago.
  • I have been working in an engineering company for around a little less than a year. I'm making good money, but I feel this kind of job is not my passion and not something I want to do for the rest of my life. (I already felt that way during my studies to be honest, but continued because I did not know what to study else).
  • Therefore I'm considering again to go to a flight school in order to become a pilot in a 2-year track.

Could you guys please advise me on the next questions?
  1. Family life is important to me and my girlfriend made it clear that she does not want to move with me to another country assuming I would be an airline pilot, which I totally respect. I live in The Netherlands. Is it possible that you fly for let's say Lufthansa, you are based in Frankfurt, but live in Amsterdam and you would commute between these two cities? Is this something that occures frequently in Europe?
  2. Is there at this time a good chance I can start flying in a country in Europe (and commute between the Netherlands & this specific country)?
  3. Flying rosters like 5 days flying & 3 days off is fine. Are there also rosters (at e.g. low fair airliners) in which you depart and come back home at the same day?
  4. Would my engineering degree (civil, not in aerospace) help getting hired at an airline? Or do airliners only care about the amount of hours you have flown?

Being an airline pilot is still my dream job and during my studies & current career I felt I should be flying and persue my passion. Yet as you have probably mentioned my family has priority and I don't think I would be able to move to another country which is 10.000km away, leave everyone behind and see them like once every 3 months. So you can be very honest to me: is becoming an airline pilot something realistic considering I would be able to commute, yet not move to another country?

I have been breaking my head around this for quite a while and some advice of people in the aviation industry would helpful ;-).

Cheers
You should put yourself as your first priority not your girlfriend. Pilot is a tough job and all sorts of compromises and sacrifices have to be made to make it in this industry.

To answer your questions yes you can live abroad at base for 4-5 days then come back home for the off days. Plenty of pilots do it so it shouldn't be a big problem but it entirely depends on the airline you work for and their terms and conditions and you also have to factor in on some off days you will be standby so can't be far away from base but again it totally depends on the airlines terms and conditions as each airline is different.

A degree is highly beneficial especially an engineering degree, it shows aptitude in itself so I think personally speaking it would be seen as a good positive on your CV

Negan is offline  
Old 20th May 2019, 19:41
  #395 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Belgium
Posts: 18
Highflyer, I also saw your post on airwork.

Apply fast to the Tui Belgium MPL program. It will close soon. Commuting to Brussels shouldn't be hard at all.
Neufunk is offline  
Old 20th May 2019, 23:53
  #396 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Southern England
Posts: 1
Thumbs up A few questions before i make the big expensive decision

Hi guys,
From the age of around 5-6, I have always wanted to be a commercial airline pilot, its always been a dream of mine, yet I have always just considered it a dream, as I always knew my family would never have anywhere near the required funds to support me.

I recently have decided to look into becoming a pilot now that I am at a point of fairly high earning, with the possibility to pay over the next few years while training,
I'm absolutely hooked, for the last couple of months, I have gone to bed dreaming about being a pilot, and waking up thinking about it.

I am going into my mid-twenties, and considering buying a house with my partner, I have recently discussed with her that I might consider spending my savings, and working a lot harder to try to fulfil my dream as a pilot, yet shes very considered and worried about if it does not work out, as we will still be renting a property and be in our late 30's, this has made I have to consider this decision a lot.

My questions! :

1)
When I was at high school it was a very bad time for me, my mother was very ill, and my mum and dad were going through a divorce, meaning my dad had to work nearly every hour to try to get himself another property to live in.
So I had a very bad experience in school and ended up working 3 days a week, and doing school one day a week, I left school with little to none GCSE's, do you think this would be a major issue for me?, and if I was to go to college to sit GCSE'S, would a airline consider this as a bad thing?, thinking I was unable to complete school normally, and had to retake at college?

2)
I am self-employed, and earn a relatively high rate of pay (approx 3200 p/month) I live in a very expensive area of UK meaning that a large portion of this going on housing and general day to day living,
I would still have to work a lot while training to pay for the majority of training, I am wondering if somebody else has done that in here, and would be able to share their struggles, is it possible?, is it worth waiting around 5years to save up for a integrated course instead of doing modular at a slower rate? or is it possible to do it while still maintaining a good amount of work time, (obviously taking time off around exams).

Thank you all for reading the post!

any other suggestion's and or advice you can give would be gratefully appreciated!
danak is offline  
Old 21st May 2019, 17:59
  #397 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 255
I think once you have a high school diploma it shouldn't be a problem regarding school exams

Yes, lots of people have done modular while working and made it work. Don't let your girlfriend tell you how to spend YOUR money that you work hard for. If you want to build a career for yourself as a pilot then why shouldn't you?

Firstly get a class 1 medical, without that you aren't going anywhere then if you get that find a place to do a PPL locally while you work and if you get a PPL and still want to go forward then sign up for ATPL theory and get ready to see any fun you have had go out the window for the next year and start smashing question banks

I would not sign up for Integrated and especially not in your position if you're self employed, if you want to make this work you can, the only person stopping you is you
Negan is offline  
Old 2nd Jul 2019, 13:02
  #398 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Germany
Posts: 1
ATPL career advice, job market

Hello everyone, my goal with this post is to hear your opinion about my plan, as most of you guys are already working in the aviation sector and got more life experience than me.
I'm currently 23 years old and soon to obtain my master's degree.

My dream has always been to become a pilot (like almost everyone's dream here on this forum) and I'm planning to go the modular way to get my ATPL.My biggest concern is the job market. I always keep an eye on the development of the job situation for pilots, but it really came to my eyes, that there are only a handful of airlines that offer jobs to "fresh out of school low hour pilots". As the job market is facing a slight downturn in the coming years (just my perception), it feels impossible to find a job in 2/3 years by the time I'll be done with my ATPL.

Is it just the fear that makes me think like this (impossibility finding a job) or will this never change and taking the risk is just a part of becoming a pilot?As I'm able to work in the US, I was thinking, if I shouldn't find a job after two years of having my ATPL, I would convert my license to FAA and try my luck there. Would cost me a bit but as the job market is in a better condition over there, the chances of getting a job are higher.

Is there any advice you guys could give me? Is the situation here in Europe really as hopeless as it looks on the first view?Thanks in advance !
Sea15 is offline  
Old 8th Jul 2019, 01:53
  #399 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Dublin
Posts: 4
EASA or FAA PPL training

Hi guys,
I have been researching online for a long time now regarding taking up PPL training, due to work annual leave constraints, I have decided the best course of action for me would be to take up a 'fast track' program later this year or early next year. Having done plenty of reading online I have decided that the best place for this would be in the US. I have a couple of questions in regards to this, and I know it may have been asked many times before on these forums, but I decided to join the PPRuNe community knowing that there will be plenty of honest, accurate knowledge and answers to help and guide me along.
Just to note, I am Irish and currently reside in Ireland, it would be my ultimate goal to fly for an airline based in Europe.
1. FAA or EASA PPL, which ultimately would be more sensible, hour building and value wise?
2.with a view to go professional and achieve CPL level sometime after completion of the PPL, would it be wise to take up the FAA licence, which I believe has additional night flying privileges, and build hours whilst achieving instrument rating?
3. I have read that once 100 hours TT has been reached it is Possible to convert the license including IFR to EASA, is this true? Is it a costly Process?The same rule across all EASA members states or it depends?
4. There is some schools in the US that teach the EASA PPL course,and at a bit of a premium too. but is there any point to travel all the way to the states to do this, rather than do it in the EU somewhere, when the FAA licence is taught pretty much everywhere of course in the US?
5. Recommendations for schools? I've researched a few, but any lessor known ones with a good reputation anywhere in the US would be appreciated.

I have so many thoughts and questions in regards to this training, it's easy to be overwhelmed by the amount of info online, I just wish to clarify some of these issues before I take the plunge, and commit to any training. Any help at all would be great.

Thank you
Honestflyer is offline  
Old 8th Jul 2019, 15:55
  #400 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: UK
Age: 41
Posts: 102
If you're going to train in the US, get an FAA private certificate. There's no point in getting an EASA one as you're only using it as a stepping stone.

You will save both time and money: There aren't meant EASA schools, which makes them among the most expensive. FAA only requires one exam and focuses on flying. You also won't need a night rating.

rudestuff is offline  

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