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Steps for 737NG typerating ???

Old 10th Sep 2012, 09:35
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Oman
Age: 31
Posts: 17
Question Steps for 737NG typerating ???

hello flyer..

I'm willing to start type rating course this December in 737-800 .

If anyone can advise how should i get ready for it and get good knowledge before i start . is there specific books or programs i should do .

i have the aircraft manuals and i have bought the 737MRG program in Ipad . but i found it so tough. it looks for professional pilots.

any help .

thanks in advance .
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Old 10th Sep 2012, 10:56
  #2 (permalink)  

PPRuNe FirstOfficer
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Surrey, UK
Posts: 137
I believe there is a website with lots of info that might interest you.

Google: "smartcockpit".
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Old 10th Sep 2012, 11:19
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Europe
Posts: 716
but i found it so tough. it looks for professional pilots
.

After completing the typerating course, you will be expected to fly to the standard of a "professional pilot". Better start reading!


1) What to get:
Really though, smartcockpit has some good info. You can also look at www.b737.org.uk. Another good idea is to buy a large size poster of the cockpit panels, so you can reference it when you are reading. Bill Bulfer has also made some good books, google it. However what you really only need is the FCTM and FCOM

Also, I can highly recommend the PMDG 737NG addon to MS Flightsim. Yes, fellow pilots, please do shoot me down for this, but it's seriously the best tool I've used. With the usual disclaimers of the books being the definitive source of information, the PMDG is scaringly accurate both in look and operation. It's expensive, but worth every cent if you use it wisely. It's worthless if all you do is firewall the throttles to fly under bridges.

2) What you can do on your own:
If you already have the books, I would recommend you to start with reading the n.20 chapters of the FCOM (the n.10 chapters talk about cockpit controls and indications and the n.20 chapters are systems descriptions), and then using the .10 chapters, the poster and the .20 chapters to reference the cockpit controls and indications to the actual systems.

Of course, the FCTM has lots of invaluable information. It is more directed at the actual operational aspects, so you need to know the technical ins-and-outs of the aircraft for that manual to make much sense.

Finally, study up on normal procedures and flight profiles (use the OM-B provided by your airline), and non-normal situations using the QRH combined with a cockpit poster and the FCOM to helt cement your systems knowledge.

Now, the Flightsim bit isn't very useful for learning to fly the aircraft, but it's very useful for the following:
-practicing your flows. These take ages to begin with, and you are expected to know them very well. You can position your viewpoint in FS to match the one in the aircraft. This is good beacuse the switches and lights look different from the seat than they do from planview.
-practicing using the FMC. It won't have every feature (such as ACARS and maintenance pages), but fiddling with it is a thousand times more intuitive than reading about it in the FCOM.
-practicing using the different autopilot/FD modes. If you haven't flown a complex autopilot/autothrottle system before, it helps if you can learn how to "play the Boeing piano" at your own pace, without any pressure.


3) What you can do with your coursemates:
The last and final step is the time-proven "paper tiger", or slightly more advanced armchair flying. If you have access to a FTD or mockup, that is the best, but even two chairs and a mate will do wonders. If feels silly at first, but trust me, it will give you soooo much back when the heat is on in the sim.


Lastly, if this is your first typerating, get into the midset that you really need to know what's going on, technically and procedurally, before the first sim. This isn't a C172 anymore, and there isn't really a lot of time to practice, drill or repeat. There won't be much in way of explanation in the sim, you are expected to know your stuff before you enter the box. It's not difficult as long as you put in the effort beforehand. Good luck!
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Old 10th Sep 2012, 13:23
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Join Date: Apr 2010
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Pilot90

What is your experience?are you hired as a 737 fo?
Where are you going to do that type rating?

Last edited by de facto; 10th Sep 2012 at 13:24.
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Old 10th Sep 2012, 17:13
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Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: North America
Age: 60
Posts: 364
737-800 type rating with 200 total hours of experience.

Researching your activity here on PPRuNe it appears you are a citizen of Oman, have approximately 200 hours and a Canadian Commercial pilot's license perhaps a frozen ATPl as well. You are looking for a Boeing 737-800 type rating.

The -800 you are about to try and type on is likely 100 X as heavy and perhaps 3 to 4 times as fast as anything you have flown. I am assuming you have no jet time.

That is a huge jump to make from flying unpressurized piston singles and light twins to the 737-800 NG. It is possible. I am assuming you will be paying for the type rating, in that case then the person/institution selling you the type rating will be glad to charge you for the time. It took me a decade or more and numerous jobs to make that same professional transition.

You will need to understand (not just memorized) the limitations section of the -800 manual. Then there are the various systems. You are going to need to understand the profiles (what configuration the airplane is in and what the normal airspeed and power settings are to achieve those configurations); normal takeoff, climb, cruise, various approaches (precision, non-precision, LNAV VNAV, RNP) and low visibility (CAT II, III(a)). Then there are all the abnormals; V1-cuts, aborts, single engine work, pressurization problems and flight control failures.

The FMC (Flight Management Computer) is going to be HUGE mystery, if you have had no experience with FMCs before. Unfortunately it will be necessary to develop some level of comfort using the FMC, it can't be ignored, but coming from a zero or very limited FMS/FMC background it will be a steep learning curve.

It can be done, but it will be a colossal amount of work. The books will be good enough for the limitations and systems and the Microsoft programs and sims for the FMC.

Last edited by Northbeach; 10th Sep 2012 at 17:39.
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Old 10th Sep 2012, 22:03
  #6 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Oman
Age: 31
Posts: 17
Code:
 I believe there is a website with lots of info that might interest you. 
 Google: "smartcockpit".
Thank you firstofficer for advice I will search for it .
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Old 10th Sep 2012, 22:11
  #7 (permalink)  
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Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Oman
Age: 31
Posts: 17
Code:
Quote: but i found it so tough. it looks for professional pilots
.
 After completing the typerating course, you will be expected to fly to the standard of a "professional pilot". Better start reading!

 1) What to get: Really though, smartcockpit has some good info. You can also look at www.b737.org.uk. Another good idea is to buy a large size poster of the cockpit panels, so you can reference it when you are reading. Bill Bulfer has also made some good books, google it. However what you really only need is the FCTM and FCOM
 Also, I can highly recommend the PMDG 737NG addon to MS Flightsim. Yes, fellow pilots, please do shoot me down for this, but it's seriously the best tool I've used. With the usual disclaimers of the books being the definitive source of information, the PMDG is scaringly accurate both in look and operation. It's expensive, but worth every cent if you use it wisely. It's worthless if all you do is firewall the throttles to fly under bridges.
 2) What you can do on your own: If you already have the books, I would recommend you to start with reading the n.20 chapters of the FCOM (the n.10 chapters talk about cockpit controls and indications and the n.20 chapters are systems descriptions), and then using the .10 chapters, the poster and the .20 chapters to reference the cockpit controls and indications to the actual systems.
 Of course, the FCTM has lots of invaluable information. It is more directed at the actual operational aspects, so you need to know the technical ins-and-outs of the aircraft for that manual to make much sense.
 Finally, study up on normal procedures and flight profiles (use the OM-B provided by your airline), and non-normal situations using the QRH combined with a cockpit poster and the FCOM to helt cement your systems knowledge.
 Now, the Flightsim bit isn't very useful for learning to fly the aircraft, but it's very useful for the following:
-practicing your flows. These take ages to begin with, and you are expected to know them very well. You can position your viewpoint in FS to match the one in the aircraft. This is good beacuse the switches and lights look different from the seat than they do from planview.
-practicing using the FMC. It won't have every feature (such as ACARS and maintenance pages), but fiddling with it is a thousand times more intuitive than reading about it in the FCOM.
-practicing using the different autopilot/FD modes. If you haven't flown a complex autopilot/autothrottle system before, it helps if you can learn how to "play the Boeing piano" at your own pace, without any pressure.

 3) What you can do with your coursemates: The last and final step is the time-proven "paper tiger", or slightly more advanced armchair flying. If you have access to a FTD or mockup, that is the best, but even two chairs and a mate will do wonders. If feels silly at first, but trust me, it will give you soooo much back when the heat is on in the sim.

 Lastly, if this is your first typerating, get into the midset that you really need to know what's going on, technically and procedurally, before the first sim. This isn't a C172 anymore, and there isn't really a lot of time to practice, drill or repeat. There won't be much in way of explanation in the sim, you are expected to know your stuff before you enter the box. It's not difficult as long as you put in the effort beforehand. Good luck!
I bought the panel already its really help to know the panel location when following the procedure according to manual and QRH instead of looking where is it .

Also I got the PMDG but I'm still not familiar with FMC inputs and the FCOM doesn't have much explanation about it.

But I will keep the study up to get more knowledge until I start my course .

Thanks again captain.
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Old 10th Sep 2012, 22:16
  #8 (permalink)  
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Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Oman
Age: 31
Posts: 17
Code:
Pilot90
 What is your experience?are you hired as a 737 fo? Where are you going to do that type rating?
My experience is very low .. CPL with ATPL theory and no jet hours at all.
I got hired for 737 SO.. Probably gonna do the type in CTC in UK.

Regards
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Old 10th Sep 2012, 22:25
  #9 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Oman
Age: 31
Posts: 17
Researching your activity here on PPRuNe it appears you are a citizen of Oman, have approximately 200 hours and a Canadian Commercial pilot's license perhaps a frozen ATPl as well. You are looking for a Boeing 737-800 type rating.

The -800 you are about to try and type on is likely 100 X as heavy and perhaps 3 to 4 times as fast as anything you have flown. I am assuming you have no jet time.

That is a huge jump to make from flying unpressurized piston singles and light twins to the 737-800 NG. It is possible. I am assuming you will be paying for the type rating, in that case then the person/institution selling you the type rating will be glad to charge you for the time. It took me a decade or more and numerous jobs to make that same professional transition.

You will need to understand (not just memorized) the limitations section of the -800 manual. Then there are the various systems. You are going to need to understand the profiles (what configuration the airplane is in and what the normal airspeed and power settings are to achieve those configurations); normal takeoff, climb, cruise, various approaches (precision, non-precision, LNAV VNAV, RNP) and low visibility (CAT II, III(a)). Then there are all the abnormals; V1-cuts, aborts, single engine work, pressurization problems and flight control failures.

The FMC (Flight Management Computer) is going to be HUGE mystery, if you have had no experience with FMCs before. Unfortunately it will be necessary to develop some level of comfort using the FMC, it can't be ignored, but coming from a zero or very limited FMS/FMC background it will be a steep learning curve.

It can be done, but it will be a colossal amount of work. The books will be good enough for the limitations and systems and the Microsoft programs and sims for the FMC.

All what you said are right .

I beleive that its high jump so I have to work hard on it . I'm trying to get prepared enough before I start to finish it in less hours and to avoid any failure .

Best of luck to all flyer in PPRuNe .
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