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Do I need a logbook ?

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Do I need a logbook ?

Old 14th Jun 2019, 18:38
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Question Do I need a logbook ?

Sorry if this is a stupid question but i'm unsure on the matter. I just started my PPL training with the goal of eventually completing the full f-ATPL. I'm two lessons in and my instructor hasn't mentioned anything about the logbook. Won't I need a logbook as proof of my 200h when applying to the airlines ?
Lastly can someone recommend me a good logbook, digital or paperback?
Thanks
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Old 14th Jun 2019, 20:42
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Yes, if you are receiving qualifying instruction, you sure want to be logging it in your personal pilot logbook! For a short period, you can recreate entries which have not been made and should have been, by going back the the flying school records, though that is not something which should be expected months or years later. There is not reason to fly as a student receiving training, solo, or PIC, without recording that experience for future qualification. Very certainly your instructor should have provided you with a pilot training record following the first training flight. Follow that up with he/she....
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Old 15th Jun 2019, 06:08
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In every jurisdiction where I have flown it is a legal requirement to keep a logbook.
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Old 16th Jun 2019, 04:08
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It's not that unusual that schools don't bother to mention a logbook for the first few lessons, as it's easy enough to retrospectively enter the first few flights from school records.

If you're going professional, I'd buy something labelled as either "FAA Professional" or "EASA compliant professional". For example...

https://transair.co.uk/pilot-supplie...-book-non-easa

https://www.pooleys.com/shop/pooleys...ying-log-book/

https://www.afeonline.com/shop/afe-p...s-logbook.html

(Those three links probably represent the most popular FAA logbook, and the two most popular EASA logbooks for professional pilots. It's really not a problem switching between EASA and FAA without changing logbook - but it's probably easiest to start as you mean to go on. That means also commencing an electronic backup - there are various commercial products to do that, or write your own; just google that topic and you'll find plenty of options and recommendations.)

Incidentally, I used one of these for 20 years (before eventually designing my own) with a mixture of CAA, JAA, EASA and FAA licences - and no great problems beyond having to change a few column headings manually... I still like it.

https://www.pooleys.com/shop/pooleys...ilots-log-book

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Old 16th Jun 2019, 05:34
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The main thing is to keep an accurate record of your flying. In the early days, ask your instruct to talk you through how to complete the log properly and make sure your logbook agrees with what your training record says; itíll save you a lot of hassle when itís time to apply for your first licence. I prefer an electronic logbook as it is really easy to generate reports for the various totals often required by either the Authority or employer. There are plenty around that are fully compliant and accepted by the authority.

Finally, if you stick with the paper version, I would recommend recording your time in decimal (every 6 mins is 0.1) as it makes totalling the columns at the end of each page much easier.
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Old 18th Jun 2019, 13:36
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Originally Posted by rarelyathome View Post
The main thing is to keep an accurate record of your flying. In the early days, ask your instruct to talk you through how to complete the log properly and make sure your logbook agrees with what your training record says; itíll save you a lot of hassle when itís time to apply for your first licence. I prefer an electronic logbook as it is really easy to generate reports for the various totals often required by either the Authority or employer. There are plenty around that are fully compliant and accepted by the authority.

Finally, if you stick with the paper version, I would recommend recording your time in decimal (every 6 mins is 0.1) as it makes totalling the columns at the end of each page much easier.
Ok thanks for the info. I bought a basic log book for my training but i think im going to use a digital one as well. Any recommendations for a lower budget ?
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Old 18th Jun 2019, 16:37
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Originally Posted by asmith474 View Post
Ok thanks for the info. I bought a basic log book for my training but i think im going to use a digital one as well. Any recommendations for a lower budget ?
One I use for free as a backup of my hardcopy logbook is mccPilotlog. I cannot post links yet but just google it - it's a downloadable / offline computer software.

It works on Mac and PC. I also use it to double-check there have been no counting errors in my paper logbook.
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Old 18th Jun 2019, 17:11
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Originally Posted by On Track View Post
In every jurisdiction where I have flown it is a legal requirement to keep a logbook.
Being pedantic, it isn't. You only need a logbook if you intend to rely on the hours you have flown to prove something...

Of course, 99.999999% of pilots need those hours to prove something - thus the pedantic comment!
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Old 19th Jun 2019, 07:20
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Well you live in a different jurisdiction. I have no idea what the rules are there.
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Old 19th Jun 2019, 08:48
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mccPilotlog is not supported anymore, the business is moving over to a new version, Crewlounge Pilotlog, see here for more about this: Best Electronic Pilot Logbook

I'm on mccPilotlog myself and wondering whether to switch to something else entirely as I'm not that impressed with the new offer. I wouldn't recommend getting mccPilotlog now as the app will not be updated.
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Old 19th Jun 2019, 21:02
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Originally Posted by Sam Rutherford View Post
Being pedantic, it isn't. You only need a logbook if you intend to rely on the hours you have flown to prove something...

Of course, 99.999999% of pilots need those hours to prove something - thus the pedantic comment!
That is in the USA.

Most of the rest of the world require all flights as crew in any capacity to be logged.

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Old 19th Jun 2019, 21:58
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If I was going to start again I would get two professional log books, fill them in in parallel and I would keep an excel backup. Also top tip write your name on the top and bottom across the ends of the pages. That way when you are trying to find your log book in a pile of 25 other identical ones you don't need to open every book.

The reason for two paper logs is you occasionally have to send your log book to the caa. I always send my number 2 logbook. They haven't failed to send it back yet, but if they did I still have the number 1 logbook.

The reason for the excel copy is it makes adding up the type time soooo much easier. I'd be wary of commercially available electronic log books. When they fold what happens? I've used them blissfully in the past until I upgrade from windows 7 to 10 and then you find it's not supported on 10.

It all sounds an arse but when you pay £400+ per hour make sure you don't lose any of it. Enjoy your flying.
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Old 20th Jun 2019, 10:21
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When going to job interviews, it's best to have a paper logbook. And not one that looks like the whole thing was written up the week before!
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