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ELECTION TIME

Old 25th May 2022, 03:15
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Cedrik,
Correct, but the development would need to be fracked to stimulate the reservoir.
So it's banned.
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Old 25th May 2022, 03:20
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Yeah I see your point, too much water has been muddied by fracking and coal arguments, that the simple answer of gas plants is lost in the mist. Australia needs to get rid of the anti nuclear Luddites as well, it's well past time they realised its clean, safe and the waste can easily be stored in our vast empty center. Most don't even realise Lucas Heights was bubbling away between 1958 and 2007 on the edge of Sydney.

Some figures to mull over, Loy Yang A in the latrobe valley produces just over 2000 MW electricity or 30% of the nominal grid. Qatar just completed a 2000 MW gas fired plant for $1.7B USD, so you could replace 30% of grid with gas for around $2B USD installed. Now that is roughly the cost of one nuclear powered submarine (by itself with no support, training or infrastructure), or just over 2 torn up freeway contracts ($1B to cancel the East West link). What is funny is that Loy Yang is owned by AGL a gas company....

Nuclear power is around $7B per 1000 MW installation, expensive but average lifespan of over 60 years. Compared to say 30 years for conventional fuel plants.

Last edited by 43Inches; 25th May 2022 at 03:42.
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Old 25th May 2022, 04:58
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Anyway, back to the election and the implications for GA.


CASA will be very relaxed and comfortable. If the pre-election Labor shadow Minister for Transport becomes the Minister for Transport, she’ll be easily managed. She’s labouring under the misconception that “there’s no margin for error in aviation safety”. Yes: She did say that. It would be laughable if the implications of someone that ignorant being responsible for the aviation safety portfolio were not so serious.

Imagine what ‘margins for error’ will be created if pilot medical fitness isn’t micro managed by Avmed, if commercial aircraft aren’t cleansed of pilots with CVD, if instructors aren’t controlled by an AOC framework, if the maintenance of simple machines designed in the middle of the last century isn’t micromanaged under complex legislation or any other activity that CASA considers “unacceptable” isn’t crushed. CASA is, after all, the authority on this stuff.

Meanwhile, it looks like two very effective sniffers-out of CASA (and other government) bullshit have managed to cruel both their chances of getting a Senate seat: Rex Patrick and Nick Xenophon. Sadly, instead of Rex Patrick ‘returning the favour’ and relinquishing his spot on the ballot to and supporting Nick Xenophon, Rex joined the mob throwing mud at Nick. Very unbecoming behaviour. Just goes to show: Once you get the taste for power, it’s very difficult to give it up. Rex Patrick will probably be a little shell-shocked at the moment. (Pauline Hanson may be in for some of the same.) But Nick did make his decision, to run, very late in the piece.

As to climate issues, if Labor gets a majority in its own right in the HoR, the Greens and ‘Teals’ and other cross-benchers will be whistling Dixie so far as Albanese is concerned. Labor has been ‘walking both sides of the street’ on e.g. coal mining and exporting for a long time. However, we can expect far greater effort from Labor in pretending to take ‘women’s issues’ seriously. The legislative ‘main game’ will be in the Senate. And even though the cross bench in the Senate will be very large, the Coalition and Labor vote with each other in the Senate, quite frequently.

If Labor doesn’t secure a majority in its own right in the HoR or there are some inconvenient defections or coronaries, the HoR will be very entertaining. And - after all - the first duty of government is to entertain.

The acid test will be whether the new Labor government creates a federal ICAC with real teeth before the end of this year. It could be done in the first week of the sitting of the new Parliament, and I suspect an independent will put up a private member’s Bill very quickly. There is now a groundswell of support for it, and no substantial opposition to it, in both Houses. But being in opposition brings with it the luxury of strong opinions. Although the Coalition seems to have been better than Labor at rorting the system, Labor is not without sin.

Bottom line for GA: BAU.
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Old 25th May 2022, 08:45
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We've failed at every turn to educate the electorate about how things actually work and why we need to move towards a zero emission world in a steady and controlled fashion.
I have spent countless hours over coffee trying to explain how solar and wind, without gas backup, will not work without huge storage. It is like p!$$ing in the wind.
How many days storage do we need in light of the poor output from solar in the last two or three months. Poor output in the last two or three months is based on my first hand solar ownership.

federal ICAC
Why do we need another layer in the form of ICAC when we, the people, have just passed judgement.
Who will oversee the Federal ICAC??
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Old 25th May 2022, 09:44
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Devil

Well actually, I WANT the 'lights to go out'......for looong periods......NO ATM's, No Fuel Pumps, NO fridges / freezers, NO TV, NO electric stoves / ovens, NO Communications, NO Mobile Towers, etc etc

NO NUTHIN'....

Then, and ONLY then, will the stoopid greens / teals / bullshi**ers etc., learn the REAL 'science' / facts of life re REAL energy requirements.

Bring it on!!

Then we might actually get to have the 'nooklear' generation.

Cheers
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Old 25th May 2022, 10:32
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Originally Posted by 601 View Post
I have spent countless hours over coffee trying to explain how solar and wind, without gas backup, will not work without huge storage. It is like p!$$ing in the wind.
How many days storage do we need in light of the poor output from solar in the last two or three months.
You've got it completely wrong I'm afraid. All we need to do is get lots of solar panels, wind turbines and batteries and all will be fine.

NOT!!!

Personally I'd have some fat nukes in the system. Has anyone checked wholesale electricity prices lately? Nukes would be a lot cheaper.
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Old 25th May 2022, 14:12
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43inches:
What you say is just not true, everywhere I have lived in Australia I have been no further than 1km from a store such as Coles/Woolies/Aldi/IGA, every one has been easily walking distance.
This is BS. Visit any of the newly built suburbs on the edge of Melbourne. Furthermore there is minimal public transport in the new suburbs.


I've never needed anything more than a small hatchback for shopping, not sure what justifies a Ford Ranger for picking up bread. If I look at my street of mostly older Australians who have retired, No one drives a compact, large sedans are the smallest cars, with three owning Dual cabs and don't even work anymore or transport anything bigger than a suitcase. I own the smallest car which probably travels the most distance out of anyone in the street.

Lucky you. for anyone with children, towing, trade, business or sports requirements a microcar doesn't cut it. The usual practice, if you can afford it, will be two cars, one large, one small. Electric is nice but only if you don't need range or are time poor. if you live or travel regularly in country areas, you need something that can take a bull bar to survive the inevitable Kangaroo and Deer collisions.


I assume you live in Melbourne, A city that had a huge chunk of it's rail network dismantled in the 80s, and then reserved land used for development, governance failures. Massive spends on freeways with until recently almost nothing to rebuild the rail and bus network, again governance failures. No rail to the airport when it was built with the intention of a rail link in the 1970s, again governance failure. The bus system is token at best, the subsidy system for it is a joke, they subsidise a 15 minute interval bus to run from Frankston to the Airport in an arc via Dandenong, a 5 hour trip for $3, but can't get a 15 minute interval bus service to the next suburb to provide links to the trains in the outer suburbs. The stations have enough parking for 1 train carriage with 6, 6 carriage services per hour at most, there's no park and ride system. These are all government failures that should have been fixed years ago, yet stagnate.

No rail network was dismantled. Investment in public transport was curtailed between circa 1960 and 1990 in favor of freeways in Victoria for two reasons:


1) The bloody minded behaviour of communist public transport unions made the system totally unreliable and the resulting low patronage made it uneconomic.


2) the American style layout and low population density of melbourne makes European style public transport uneconomic outside the inner city core. melbourne is now bigger than Los Angeles.


Now repeat the above in every city in Australia.


Victoria still burns BROWN COAL for base load, its basically rotten wood, if you've ever held brown coal you would see how bad the stuff is. A nuclear powerplant could easily provide cheap and reliable base load to several cities, meaning all the electric transport in that city becomes a lot greener.


A simple and significant start would be to provide electric school buses for all government schools within the school zone, enough to actually service the local area and get the mums off the roads in en-masse SUV rushes.

Agreed, but the ALP policy is no nuclear energy - not one bit BTW Australia contains at least 30% of the worlds uranium reserves. The miners can't even find the edge of the deposits around the Flinders Ranges.


I use the UK as an example, why, because they have changed in the last 20 years, most of which in the last 10 years. They went from nearly 50% reliance on coal for energy to 0%. That was not a gradual or stepped change, they did it in a few short years.

Sure, and the UK is a tiny country with a high population density that makes it economic. It also has a larger manufacturing base to support such infrastructure projects.


In Europe and the UK I use the trains where possible and a Fiat500 rental or similar if not. . In Australia, outside capital city cores, we don't have enough population density to make trains viable.
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Old 25th May 2022, 23:19
  #48 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Lead Balloon View Post
Anyway, back to the election and the implications for GA.


CASA will be very relaxed and comfortable. If the pre-election Labor shadow Minister for Transport becomes the Minister for Transport, she’ll be easily managed. She’s labouring under the misconception that “there’s no margin for error in aviation safety”. Yes: She did say that. It would be laughable if the implications of someone that ignorant being responsible for the aviation safety portfolio were not so serious.

Imagine what ‘margins for error’ will be created if pilot medical fitness isn’t micro managed by Avmed, if commercial aircraft aren’t cleansed of pilots with CVD, if instructors aren’t controlled by an AOC framework, if the maintenance of simple machines designed in the middle of the last century isn’t micromanaged under complex legislation or any other activity that CASA considers “unacceptable” isn’t crushed. CASA is, after all, the authority on this stuff.

Meanwhile, it looks like two very effective sniffers-out of CASA (and other government) bullshit have managed to cruel both their chances of getting a Senate seat: Rex Patrick and Nick Xenophon. Sadly, instead of Rex Patrick ‘returning the favour’ and relinquishing his spot on the ballot to and supporting Nick Xenophon, Rex joined the mob throwing mud at Nick. Very unbecoming behaviour. Just goes to show: Once you get the taste for power, it’s very difficult to give it up. Rex Patrick will probably be a little shell-shocked at the moment. (Pauline Hanson may be in for some of the same.) But Nick did make his decision, to run, very late in the piece.

As to climate issues, if Labor gets a majority in its own right in the HoR, the Greens and ‘Teals’ and other cross-benchers will be whistling Dixie so far as Albanese is concerned. Labor has been ‘walking both sides of the street’ on e.g. coal mining and exporting for a long time. However, we can expect far greater effort from Labor in pretending to take ‘women’s issues’ seriously. The legislative ‘main game’ will be in the Senate. And even though the cross bench in the Senate will be very large, the Coalition and Labor vote with each other in the Senate, quite frequently.

If Labor doesn’t secure a majority in its own right in the HoR or there are some inconvenient defections or coronaries, the HoR will be very entertaining. And - after all - the first duty of government is to entertain.

The acid test will be whether the new Labor government creates a federal ICAC with real teeth before the end of this year. It could be done in the first week of the sitting of the new Parliament, and I suspect an independent will put up a private member’s Bill very quickly. There is now a groundswell of support for it, and no substantial opposition to it, in both Houses. But being in opposition brings with it the luxury of strong opinions. Although the Coalition seems to have been better than Labor at rorting the system, Labor is not without sin.

Bottom line for GA: BAU.
And it was better under the other mob? Good to see your giving the incoming the benefit of the doubt, not biased at all are you Leady.
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Old 26th May 2022, 01:17
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This is BS. Visit any of the newly built suburbs on the edge of Melbourne. Furthermore there is minimal public transport in the new suburbs.
I have lived in a number of them, and as I said never been more than 1km from a supermarket, might have been an IGA at times, but still within walking distance. You are showing your entitlement and assuming things rather than actually knowing what happens in these suburbs, yes public transport is an issue, as I said earlier, a lack of government action. There is a lack of proper road systems to support these suburbs altogether, this is what failed attempts at providing cheap housing looks like. However unlike affluent suburbs where 1 family will use 1 dual cab/SUV to deliver 1 or 2 kids to school, in these suburbs a lot of families have a friend with a van that picks up the kids and delivers three or four families of children to school and various other activities. The schools have a better bussing systems that actual go where the kids are etc etc. This is a big difference between the West and North and say Melbournes inner East and Southern suburbs in that the mostly immigrant families do work together to pool resourses in spite of lacking government provisions.

Lucky you. for anyone with children, towing, trade, business or sports requirements a microcar doesn't cut it. The usual practice, if you can afford it, will be two cars, one large, one small. Electric is nice but only if you don't need range or are time poor. if you live or travel regularly in country areas, you need something that can take a bull bar to survive the inevitable Kangaroo and Deer collisions.
So before all these micro monster trucks appeared how did you tow or conduct business? Has business only been occurring since the Toyota Hilux was invented? Funny note, my mate a tradie owned a UTE, had to continuously borrow his dads large VAN because the ute wasn't big enough to carry a lot of trade items (and he didn't want to get his ute damaged).

I've driven all over the country in Sedans and Hatches, the trick to not hitting roos and other natives, DON'T DRIVE AT NIGHT. If you think the modern excuse for a bullbar will save you from a horse, cow or camel or even large roo on the road if you hit it at speed you are in lala land. They are low set, will promote rollover, they just take the legs from the animal now and throw it into the windscreen. That's because your bullbars have to be designed to minimise harm to pedestrians. There's a good dashcam of a Ford Ranger hitting a cow and rolling (or hitting anything and rolling).

The mini monster trucks are lifestyle vehicles and possibly cheap mine site rovers, although a Landcruiser has always done the job better and offers better reliability etc.

Sure, and the UK is a tiny country with a high population density that makes it economic. It also has a larger manufacturing base to support such infrastructure projects.
We just signed up $200billion for military projects, switching to gas electricity would cost less than $10B in Victoria, the 'affordability' argument is rubbish.
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Old 26th May 2022, 01:54
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switching to gas electricity
Gas is a fossil fuel too.

Go nuclear.

Re big vehicles, we need big vans to carry 4 people and a pile of equipment. A piddly electric skate cannot do the job. And sometimes the van has to be used to get to the shops. Which are much more than 1 km away. Only when I lived in Sydney was there a supermarket within 1 km. Not in (at the time) Point Cook, Bullsbrook, Farrer, Ipswich, Raymond Terrace, or Ellerston (1 hour drive to a shop). You have been able to choose your locations well. I have not been so fortunate.

Our personal vehicle is a 7-seat SUV, because (a) I like it, and (b) we often carry a tribe of people 140km to Brisbane and back. There is only 1 train per hour to Brisbane in daylight, and the station is 40 minutes drive away. Or a 90-minute bus ride away, with 2 changes of bus. Only practical to burn some dinosaurs and drive.
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Old 26th May 2022, 02:09
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There is no doubt a 'need' for some of these vehicles. However the fact they top the list of purchased vehicles last year both position 1 and 2 shows that many people that do not need them are purchasing them. And like I said earlier, you just have to attend school pickup, drive on freeway in peak, etc, to see these vehicles being driven by a solo driver with nothing being towed and little to nothing in the tray. That means people with too much spare cash are buying them and adding to the carbon footprint, simple as that, it all adds up.

Gas power is necessary as a stop gap to nuclear, it reduces carbon output by a factor or 2 to 3, probably closer to 3 times greener for Victoria because of brown coal baseload.

Sorry but not being able to pollute the planet by cutting back on excessive lifestyle use of fossil fuels is part of the hard yards. Same as it's uncool now to go around shooting wildlife for pleasure. Victoria could easily have switched to gas on a lot of levels 30 years ago, from road transport to power generation to many other things, but we still burn Brown coal, because it's easy. They even toyed with turning brown coal into gas to make it greener for burning (and more efficient), ie gas burns hotter and cleaner per unit than coal so not just greener but better bang for buck.

There is nothing better about a ICU road vehicle than an electric one. ICU requires gearboxes, drivetrain, weight distribution is determined by cumbersome mechanical features, higher CoG, meaning worse cornering and road handling, delayed power transmission due to fuel input and drivetrain lag. Electric vehicles can have the CoG very low and evenly distributed meaning better balance, less roll, better cornering and road handling, instant power with easy distribution of power to each wheel, each engine can be in the wheel itself meaning no drive train, recovery of energy through braking, and so many other things.

Also for towing electric is far better, higher torque with power distribution to each wheel individually, not real issues with higher engine load. Ie towing anything reduces the life of your ICU engine due to increased load within it. You could even link the trailer with motors so it's wheels add to tractive power and regenerative braking.

Last edited by 43Inches; 26th May 2022 at 02:21.
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Old 26th May 2022, 03:13
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Yup, ban coal, ban the petrochemical industries and head back to the dark ages, lose your precious mobile phone or ipad or tupperware, lets start storing our perishables in cardboard lose every 'convenience' you live with today. Lose all the building materials like steel etc and start living in tents again. Can't wait for all this to start taking place and the morons start whinging.
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Old 26th May 2022, 03:29
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Why do we need another layer in the form of ICAC when we, the people, have just passed judgement.
Because one of the deleterious effects of Laborial governments over decades is the politicisation of the ‘public service’. It’s now finely tuned to facilitate each side’s rorts and bastardry rather than provide frank and fearless advice in the public interest. A federal ICAC would help to expose these systemic problems in the ‘public service’.

Scotty from Marketing was keen to paint corruption as being only a criminal matter which, accordingly, is a matter for the Federal Police (at the Commonwealth level). But most of the rorts and bastardry done by governments these days is not criminal. Scotty knows that.

Many members of the public don’t know that the words “offence” and “penalty” appear nowhere in the Commonwealth Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act. Go here and do a search yourself. It’s not a crime for an government official to breach provisions of that Act. It’s not crime to breach the Commonwealth Procurement Rules.

Hundreds of billions of dollars are administered by Commonwealth government agencies, supposedly in accordance with this legislation. But it’s not a crime to fail to comply with it. Insistence on compliance in the face of political pressure may get you sacked. If the government wants to spend a lazy couple of hundred millions on sports grants, why lose your job by standing your ground on compliance? The taxpayers are going to be a couple of hundred million lighter in any event.

Allocating sports grants for partisan political advantage isn’t criminal. But it is unlawful.

Robodebt wasn’t criminal, but the law was not complied with in driving the powerless to despair and, in some cases, suicide. Bureaucrats with no shame or humanity sat in front of Parliamentary Committees and defended that system and pretended not to be aware of the level of stress and damage the system was causing. And of course the arseholes settled the Federal Court litigation so that they could claim that no finding of unlawfulness was ever made by a court. (This is CASA Avmed’s modus operandi: do whatever you like to individually powerless pilots, knowing that most cannot bear the cost or stress of taking Avmed on and, in the rare cases that are fought, only back down if there’s a risk of embarrassment in the AAT or court.)

Who will oversee the Federal ICAC??
Who ‘oversees’ the High Court? Who ‘oversees’ a Royal Commissioner?

The very point of these kinds of bodies is to give people with integrity and expertise the resources, powers and independence to find out facts, without fear or favour. Royal Commissions are generally ad hoc responses to specific issues. Courts don’t get involved of their ‘own motion’ - a dispute between parties has to exist. A properly-constituted corruption investigative body is there, all the time, watching and inquiring. At the Commonwealth level, the cost would repay itself many times over, very quickly.

As to the trashing of reputations, I’ve seen front page newspaper headlines with pictures of people with whom I’ve worked, identified as being under investigation by a State ICAC for misuse of travel and other public sector entitlements. The inquiry was conducted and they were exonerated. Remained employed throughout and are still employed. About the only people who remember the headlines are them. Shrug and move on.

A properly-constituted ICAC makes those who are paid out of public money and have access to public money think very, very carefully about their decision-making and behaviour. Their phones can be ‘bugged’. They can be compelled to give evidence. It’s a vastly different power balance compared with the ‘public service’ versus the individual citizen.
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Old 26th May 2022, 03:47
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Leady, I say bring it on.

Whilst we're at it, can they do anything about the public sector bloat?
I reckon we hit critical mass (where more people work on the public teat in one way or another, than otherwise) about 15 years ago. It's been downhill ever since.
If an ICRAP can assist there, I'm all for it x 2.
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Old 26th May 2022, 06:16
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Originally Posted by Lead Balloon View Post

A properly-constituted ICAC makes those who are paid out of public money and have access to public money think very, very carefully about their decision-making and behaviour. Their phones can be ‘bugged’. They can be compelled to give evidence. It’s a vastly different power balance compared with the ‘public service’ versus the individual citizen.
Interesting to note it was a Liberal party Premier in NSW who created the NSW ICAC in 1988 after running on a campaign to clean up the supposed corruption of the two previous Labor governments. The ICAC found no wrongdoing by those ALP governments, but found corrupt behaviour from the very same Liberal Premier who created the body, leading to his resignation.

This Liberal party created ICAC has also led to the downfall of two more Liberal premiers, O’Farrell and Berejiklian, along with her deputy John “Bruz” Barilaro, along with some Labor MPs.
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Old 26th May 2022, 12:58
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but found corrupt behaviour from the very same Liberal Premier
With the post script being:

Greiner successfully appealed against the finding in the New South Wales Court of Appeal, which in a 2-1 vote on 21 August 1992 overturned the ICAC findings.[20] The court found that ICAC had "exceeded its jurisdiction" in ruling against the two ministers[21] and granted "declaratory relief that the Commission's report was wrong in law
along with some Labor MPs.
Lets just unpack that very brief statement. Eddie Obeid and Ian McDonald who both went to gaol for their corrupt behavior in making millions out of corrupt dealings.. Eddie Obeid was a major power broker within Labor NSW and got to dictate who got what job.

You lefties are cock-a-hoop at the moment but politics has a way of throwing up all sorts of skullduggery that even the "purest" Greenie has indulged in.
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Old 26th May 2022, 13:24
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Interesting to note it was a Liberal party Premier in NSW who created the NSW ICAC in 1988 after running on a campaign to clean up the supposed corruption of the two previous Labor governments. The ICAC found no wrongdoing by those ALP governments, but found corrupt behaviour from the very same Liberal Premier who created the body, leading to his resignation.

This Liberal party created ICAC has also led to the downfall of two more Liberal premiers, O’Farrell and Berejiklian, along with her deputy John “Bruz” Barilaro, along with some Labor MPs.
Dude, you continually post on here, masquerading as a neutral voice, only posting the 'facts.' So it's only the Libs that are corrupt right? Probably the filthiest eras of corruption in NSW are from the Wran Labor government and the Obied and MacDonald rubbish. Your bias is as blinding as the midday summer sun.
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Old 26th May 2022, 14:18
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43nches should be a real estate agent. I want to buy into one of his suburbs where all facilities are within easy walking distance and house prices are way less than 500K.

Then I want a job where I can use public transport or a bicycle every day to get to work rain or shine.

My wife will want a tiny electrocar to take all our kids to school and after school activities as well as for her job. Miraculously the car will fit all the junk kids have these days.

Everything will be powered by a teensy solar cell on the roof of our sustainable house which is made out of recycled election posters. When the sun doesnt shine a tiny windmill does the same.

On weekends we will gather with our neighbors at the community vegetable garden to watch reruns of :"The Sound of Music".

I have nothing against an electric lifestyle, I am fighting to ensure that the poor, aged and infirm don't freeze to death while you lot are fiddling with our energy supplies.

To put it another way, the Canberra &*^%ers couldn't even get the NBN right, its still &*^%ed.......and you want to let them loose on energy infrastructure????????


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Old 27th May 2022, 03:08
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To put it another way, the Canberra &*^%ers couldn't even get the NBN right, its still &*^%ed.......and you want to let them loose on energy infrastructure????????
You do realise it was the conservative idiots that sold us a compromise 'because it was cheaper' that led to the NBN we have had to fix constantly to get half of what the original Labor plan was. And spare me the old folks cant afford shite, they are mostly responsible for current house prices as they can sell large inner city properties at premium and pay exorbitant cash prices for what they want in the burbs or country. I'm not young, and have regular drinks with some retiring older folk who are very well off, ex real estate agents, bank managers, tradies, small business owners etc. If you didn't make money in the last 50 years you were the odd ones out or blew it on something rubbish or didn't try hard enough. What is happening generally with poor vs rich is the same as it was 50 years ago, you either have or have not, or had and blew it on scams or rubbish.

The conservative plans that have held back green power progress are doing exactly the same thing. The world is moving on, your energy is not getting more expensive because it's greener, in Australia its because it was privatised and monopolised and is running on technology from the 60s, with inflation this all compounds. The longer you hold onto obsolete technology the more expensive it gets to run it and the more expensive it gets to upgrade when it's finally obvious that is what is required.

One of the biggest nails in the GA coffin was lack of innovation since the late 70s. No one built or tried anything different from the bog standard Piper or Cessna for 30 years. You wonder why a general lack of interest developed and the whole infrastructure died. Why buy a plane when its 50s tech, not particularly exciting, have to work at getting qualified and you have to keep up with rules and procedure changes. I can buy the latest Tesla now and it drives me by itself to my destination, and I can show it off. Show a plane to my business mates, yeah cool, didn't bob kill himself in one of those in the 80s? next, who wants drinks on my 2021 60 footer down the marina while we watch the game on the 200" LED in the stateroom?

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Old 29th May 2022, 09:50
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43 inches;
One of the biggest nails in the GA coffin was lack of innovation since the late 70s. No one built or tried anything different from the bog standard Piper or Cessna for 30 years. You wonder why a general lack of interest developed and the whole infrastructure died. Why buy a plane when its 50s tech, not particularly exciting, have to work at getting qualified and you have to keep up with rules and procedure changes. I can buy the latest Tesla now and it drives me by itself to my destination, and I can show it off. Show a plane to my business mates, yeah cool, didn't bob kill himself in one of those in the 80s? next, who wants drinks on my 2021 60 footer down the marina while we watch the game on the 200" LED in the stateroom?
I think a little engineering advice might help you.

1) In terms of the actual aerodynamic design of subsonic piston engined aircraft, the science is cut and dried, meaning the trade - offs are known. In other words, no one is likely to come up with an aerodynamic design that ticks all existing performance boxes and has twice the performance. Materials, Engines and avionics are a different matter. The changes in Avionics are amazing, Carbon fibre is here and there is steady incremental progress in engines. So in terms of pure technology, we are stuck with incremental improvements. I am told for example that the performance of a thirty year old Bonanza design is not too different from a Cirrus. The laws of physics don’t change much

2) The cost of certifying a new design is simply horrendous.

3) Some technological advances are not applicable to small piston engined aircraft, like variable valve timing etc. because the aircraft engine duty cycle is very different to an automobile. New battery technology, enabling greater performance and a better power to weight ratio and greater range would be a game changing stimulant for new designs.

Therefore the tendency is to leave things alone.
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