Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Aircrew Forums > Military Aviation
Reload this Page >

The Warship: Tour of Duty

Military Aviation A forum for the professionals who fly military hardware. Also for the backroom boys and girls who support the flying and maintain the equipment, and without whom nothing would ever leave the ground. All armies, navies and air forces of the world equally welcome here.

The Warship: Tour of Duty

Old 6th Feb 2023, 09:18
  #61 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: The back of beyond
Posts: 1,996
Received 81 Likes on 45 Posts
Originally Posted by Dominator2
It gets worse!

Why would any sane man (person) send 1000+ mateloes on a "run ashore" in Cyprus during Covid?


If a Risk Assessment had been done it would have certainly shown that Covid would be bought onto the ship with unknown consequences!


If The Mission was so important it was put at risk by some poor decision making, IMHO.
Indeed, it was only going to end one way really.
melmothtw is offline  
Old 6th Feb 2023, 09:30
  #62 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: The South
Posts: 283
Received 30 Likes on 15 Posts
Originally Posted by BEagle
The series featuring HMS Ark Royal!

RoD Stewart's 1975 song was actually 'Sailing'...
And first done by Sutherland Brothers & Quiver...
Timmy Tomkins is offline  
The following users liked this post:
Old 6th Feb 2023, 09:50
  #63 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Den Haag
Age: 56
Posts: 5,920
Received 207 Likes on 118 Posts
Originally Posted by melmothtw
Indeed, it was only going to end one way really.
Iím intrigued to see if they go ashore in their next port!
212man is offline  
Old 6th Feb 2023, 18:02
  #64 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Wales
Posts: 33
Received 6 Likes on 4 Posts
Last night's episode brought it home to me how our society has evolved during the last 50 years. In 1974 while on ops in the Norwegian fjords aboard HMS Hermes, we (845 NAS) lost a Wessex along with its pilot and aircrewman. The next day we had a small dignified memorial service punctuated by an RM bugle Last Post. No one seemed to need counselling, just back to work and crack on.

Last night, we learnt that a junior crew member aboard another ship of the task group (HMS Kent) had taken his own life. Sad yes but this seemed to trigger mass mourning aboard 'Big Liz' even though no one knew the deceased. So the boss suggested that officers and senior rates should look out for anyone that looked as though they might need a hug!

I wonder what folk that went south in 1982 aboard HMS SHEFFIELD, RFA SIR GALAHAD and HMS FEARLESS think about today's Forces?

Getting old!

welshwaffu is offline  
The following users liked this post:
Old 6th Feb 2023, 18:18
  #65 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: lincs
Posts: 78
Received 36 Likes on 19 Posts
Originally Posted by welshwaffu

I wonder what folk that went south in 1982 aboard HMS SHEFFIELD, RFA SIR GALAHAD and HMS FEARLESS think about today's Forces?

Getting old!
Every generation thinks that the younger ones are softer than they were, GW1, Bosnia, GW2, numerous TELICs, HERRICKs and other ops have proved that little Johnny is the man his Dad was. I've been in 36 years now, things have changed massively, some good some bad, but when it comes to actually doing the business and fighting, we're the same as ever.
cheekychimp is offline  
The following 5 users liked this post by cheekychimp:
Old 6th Feb 2023, 20:39
  #66 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Station 42
Age: 68
Posts: 1,050
Received 42 Likes on 15 Posts
I was surprised to see that the crew were given a run ashore in a potential Covid environment too. Very strange.
Ronnie Lambert seems to be a trouble magnet, being chased by Russian heavies after a contretemp in a night club despite the crew being previously warned about avoiding certain 'venues'.
stevef is offline  
Old 6th Feb 2023, 21:42
  #67 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Location: Location!
Posts: 2,259
Received 18 Likes on 13 Posts
Originally Posted by stevef
I was surprised to see that the crew were given a run ashore in a potential Covid environment too. Very strange.
Ronnie Lambert seems to be a trouble magnet, being chased by Russian heavies after a contretemp in a night club despite the crew being previously warned about avoiding certain 'venues'.
I would take that story with a king-sized pinch of salt and, likeable as he may very well be, I was not totally surprised to learn that he has allegedly since been discharged as SNLR.

Jack
Union Jack is offline  
Old 6th Feb 2023, 23:47
  #68 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Quite near 'An aerodrome somewhere in England'
Posts: 26,581
Received 165 Likes on 63 Posts
If that sailor was really being chased by Russian heavies, where were his shipmates? Surely they look out for each other on runs ashore?

I gather that SNLR means 'Services No Longer Required'?
BEagle is online now  
The following users liked this post:
Old 7th Feb 2023, 08:28
  #69 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 29
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
As of yesterday I believe, he is now a Postman.
G-MILF is offline  
Old 7th Feb 2023, 08:50
  #70 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Here
Posts: 1,633
Received 18 Likes on 13 Posts
Originally Posted by G-MILF
As of yesterday I believe, he is now a Postman.
Looking at his social media, he seems to have left at some point between January (when he joined PoW) and April last year.
Davef68 is offline  
Old 7th Feb 2023, 17:21
  #71 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: London/Oxford/New York
Posts: 2,868
Received 110 Likes on 49 Posts
Originally Posted by welshwaffu
Last night's episode brought it home to me how our society has evolved during the last 50 years. In 1974 while on ops in the Norwegian fjords aboard HMS Hermes, we (845 NAS) lost a Wessex along with its pilot and aircrewman. The next day we had a small dignified memorial service punctuated by an RM bugle Last Post. No one seemed to need counselling, just back to work and crack on.

Last night, we learnt that a junior crew member aboard another ship of the task group (HMS Kent) had taken his own life. Sad yes but this seemed to trigger mass mourning aboard 'Big Liz' even though no one knew the deceased. So the boss suggested that officers and senior rates should look out for anyone that looked as though they might need a hug!

I wonder what folk that went south in 1982 aboard HMS SHEFFIELD, RFA SIR GALAHAD and HMS FEARLESS think about today's Forces?

Getting old!
The change over the past 50 years is precisely because of ridiculous stiff upper lip attitudes that suppressed emotion and reactions and led to multiple cases of suicide, depression, PTSD, mental illness and general breakdowns in health and well being. The cases of PTSD from the Falklands and NI are still coming to the surface and cost numerous lives and mental health well being. Thankfully it is different today, and today's younger people are far better equipped to cope and move on. More strength to their elbow!
pr00ne is online now  
The following 10 users liked this post by pr00ne:
Old 7th Feb 2023, 18:15
  #72 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Station 42
Age: 68
Posts: 1,050
Received 42 Likes on 15 Posts
Originally Posted by pr00ne
The change over the past 50 years is precisely because of ridiculous stiff upper lip attitudes that suppressed emotion and reactions and led to multiple cases of suicide, depression, PTSD, mental illness and general breakdowns in health and well being. The cases of PTSD from the Falklands and NI are still coming to the surface and cost numerous lives and mental health well being. Thankfully it is different today, and today's younger people are far better equipped to cope and move on. More strength to their elbow!
I'm sure that's true in armed conflict and emergency service scenarios but perhaps there's too much nurturing of the satellites outside of those circumstances. There seems to be waves of false grief and vigils for victims of accidents and murders over the past ten or so years and to make it worse, the adults bring their young children along to lay flowers, cards and toys. That's going to affect them more than the actual death of a pupil or person they barely - or even never - knew. Kids are resilient and I don't think they should be dragged into the 'out-pourings' of grief when a simple explanation is all that's needed.
I've had the usual share of family, friend and acquaintance losses as well as seeing some early violent departures and never felt the need for subsequent group hugs, counselling and public displays of emotion. It's probably a generation thing although it's been going on for thousands of years.
stevef is offline  
The following users liked this post:
Old 7th Feb 2023, 18:38
  #73 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Den Haag
Age: 56
Posts: 5,920
Received 207 Likes on 118 Posts
Originally Posted by pr00ne
The change over the past 50 years is precisely because of ridiculous stiff upper lip attitudes that suppressed emotion and reactions and led to multiple cases of suicide, depression, PTSD, mental illness and general breakdowns in health and well being. The cases of PTSD from the Falklands and NI are still coming to the surface and cost numerous lives and mental health well being. Thankfully it is different today, and today's younger people are far better equipped to cope and move on. More strength to their elbow!
I suspect the changes are more to do with the consequences of 20 years of continuous operational tours in the ME. You are correct that there are many cases of PTSD from the Falklands, but I would suggest that seeing your friends get their jaw shot off, or bayonetting a bunch of crying conscripts in a trench in the night, is somewhat more traumatic than learning that a bloke you never knew, on a ship youíve never been on, has topped himself.
212man is offline  
The following 5 users liked this post by 212man:
Old 7th Feb 2023, 18:50
  #74 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: London/Oxford/New York
Posts: 2,868
Received 110 Likes on 49 Posts
Originally Posted by 212man
I suspect the changes are more to do with the consequences of 20 years of continuous operational tours in the ME. You are correct that there are many cases of PTSD from the Falklands, but I would suggest that seeing your friends get their jaw shot off, or bayonetting a bunch of crying conscripts in a trench in the night, is somewhat more traumatic than learning that a bloke you never knew, on a ship youíve never been on, has topped himself.
Maybe, or maybe that you are just far less emphatic, caring and sympathetic than most?

I found the outpouring of emotion and grief at the death of Princess Diana to be a very strange reaction, but I find the expression of solidarity and compassion with those experiencing grief or loss a heart warming, uniting and overwhelmingly good thing.

No doubt you would just dismiss it as mere virtual signalling.

pr00ne is online now  
Old 7th Feb 2023, 18:57
  #75 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Den Haag
Age: 56
Posts: 5,920
Received 207 Likes on 118 Posts
Originally Posted by pr00ne
Maybe, or maybe that you are just far less emphatic, caring and sympathetic than most?

I found the outpouring of emotion and grief at the death of Princess Diana to be a very strange reaction, but I find the expression of solidarity and compassion with those experiencing grief or loss a heart warming, uniting and overwhelmingly good thing.

No doubt you would just dismiss it as mere virtual signalling.
I think Iím pretty empathetic and sympathetic in general, and I also found the response to Dianaís death strange. But Iím not sure showing compassion for people experiencing grief they donít really have a right to experience is appropriate.

By the way, this was my best mate. 21 years old in 1988. Several more followed. Iím not without feelings!!!



Last edited by 212man; 7th Feb 2023 at 19:10.
212man is offline  
Old 7th Feb 2023, 18:58
  #76 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Baston
Posts: 2,967
Received 273 Likes on 122 Posts
Originally Posted by stevef
I'm sure that's true in armed conflict and emergency service scenarios but perhaps there's too much nurturing of the satellites outside of those circumstances. There seems to be waves of false grief and vigils for victims of accidents and murders over the past ten or so years and to make it worse, the adults bring their young children along to lay flowers, cards and toys. That's going to affect them more than the actual death of a pupil or person they barely - or even never - knew. Kids are resilient and I don't think they should be dragged into the 'out-pourings' of grief when a simple explanation is all that's needed.
I've had the usual share of family, friend and acquaintance losses as well as seeing some early violent departures and never felt the need for subsequent group hugs, counselling and public displays of emotion. It's probably a generation thing although it's been going on for thousands of years.
Two good school friends of my age [15] died in separate tragedies. One was a marvellous all-round sportsman, both were achievers. There was no assembly to announce the deaths, [They "died", not "passed"] There was no overt grief. There was no counselling. That is how it was in 1951 or so.
Nothing to do with stiff upper lip, suppressed grief, PTSD. We talked a bit about the events for a few days and moved on.

The past is a foreign country, they do things differently there

Last edited by langleybaston; 7th Feb 2023 at 19:25.
langleybaston is online now  
Old 7th Feb 2023, 19:30
  #77 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Around
Posts: 1,112
Received 63 Likes on 28 Posts
This forum is amazing, truly a case of say what you want on the internet, but I'd wager not to many peoples faces!

And it's free as well. It'll be a sad day when it folds.
downsizer is offline  
The following users liked this post:
Old 7th Feb 2023, 19:54
  #78 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Den Haag
Age: 56
Posts: 5,920
Received 207 Likes on 118 Posts
Originally Posted by downsizer
This forum is amazing, truly a case of say what you want on the internet, but I'd wager not to many peoples faces!

And it's free as well. It'll be a sad day when it folds.
I hope youíre not referring to me? Iíll say any and all to anybody.
212man is offline  
The following 2 users liked this post by 212man:
Old 7th Feb 2023, 19:55
  #79 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Station 42
Age: 68
Posts: 1,050
Received 42 Likes on 15 Posts
Originally Posted by downsizer
This forum is amazing, truly a case of say what you want on the internet, but I'd wager not to many peoples faces!

And it's free as well. It'll be a sad day when it folds.
I like to think my posts are measured (I read them three or four times before sending) and definitely nothing that I wouldn't say to anyone over a soothing pint. Some members (usually on Jet Blast) seem to take offence very quickly, followed by the usual baying mob eager for a kill. I doubt their Pprune personas (sp?) echo their 'real' life though.
stevef is offline  
The following 2 users liked this post by stevef:
Old 8th Feb 2023, 07:59
  #80 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Ferrara
Posts: 7,326
Received 190 Likes on 124 Posts
"I wonder what folk that went south in 1982 aboard HMS SHEFFIELD, RFA SIR GALAHAD and HMS FEARLESS think about today's Forces?"

IIRC at the time the question was asked

"I wonder what folk that went ashore in 1944, or fought in the Atlantic, the Murmansk run or the Malta Convoys think about today's Forces?"

Asturias56 is offline  
The following 3 users liked this post by Asturias56:

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.