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A very good military read

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A very good military read

Old 9th Sep 2023, 19:11
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ARA still exists, it has an interesting heritage: https://www.ara.co.uk/about-ara/our-heritage/

I finished Mike Bannister's 'Concorde' recently. It's a good read and certainly provides a very clear insight into what happened to the Air France Concorde at Gonesse. To get back on track a bit.... I also really enjoyed 'Fall Out Roman Catholics and Jews' by Tony Haig-Thomas, and 'Lightnings to Spitfires' by Clive Rowley. Perhaps they have been mentioned before...
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Old 9th Sep 2023, 21:38
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I enjoyed this pilot's story. The title was an unfortunate choice given the self-immolation by the Reds earlier this year, but don't let that put you off, it is a very good read, especially if you like your stories from the cockpit unembellished by political correctness.
The final chapters are a brief description of his time with the Reds; the rest of the book is best described as a 300-page love letter to the Buccaneer, Hunter and Fleet Air Arm. Buy it and enjoy, you will not be disappointed.



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Old 11th Sep 2023, 17:23
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HMS RUTLAND


Has similar overtones to the Jacaranda Trilogy by Larry Jerome-Croft even down time slips and to names plus Jane Austin?
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Old 15th Sep 2023, 10:12
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May I recommend something completely different, The Letters of Private Wheeler, 1809-1828. He fought with Wellington's army throughout most of the Peninsula Campaign and, although having only a basic education, writes vividly of the experiences of the ordinary soldier. In fact, he write so well, that John Keegan said. "In a later age he would have become a successful war correspondent... He was one of military history's great originals".

You can buy the book from Amazon and Waterstones, and I highly recpmmend it.
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Old 10th Oct 2023, 18:26
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I’m going to go out on a limb here and recommend a series of novels by an ex AAC pilot, Karl Jackson, entitled, “Harry’s Game”.

Over 9 books, they follow the life of RAF pilot Harry Cornwall through WW2. Book One starts in France in Spring 1940 and covers the Battle of France and the retreat and evacuation from Dunkirk.

The following books include: the Battle of Britain, the early defence of Malta,(including Faith, Hope and Charity. Any author that does that has to worth a read), a flag waving tour of the USA, a second tour in Malta(flying reconnaissance in Martin Marylands and Spitfires), a tour on Mosquitoes and flying Lysanders into occupied France. A posting to a Tempest Sqn, a secondment to an American P38 Sqn to mention just a few of the plot lines.

They are available in the Amazon Kindle store and as soon as you look at the link you’ll see that there is a HUGE twist in the tale.

However, I found the author’s style of writing very immersive, so give them a try.

Amazon Amazon
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Old 10th Oct 2023, 21:40
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Originally Posted by MightyGem
I’m going to go out on a limb here and recommend a series of novels by an ex AAC pilot, Karl Jackson, entitled, “Harry’s Game”.

Over 9 books, they follow the life of RAF pilot Harry Cornwall through WW2. Book One starts in France in Spring 1940 and covers the Battle of France and the retreat and evacuation from Dunkirk.

The following books include: the Battle of Britain, the early defence of Malta,(including Faith, Hope and Charity. Any author that does that has to worth a read), a flag waving tour of the USA, a second tour in Malta(flying reconnaissance in Martin Marylands and Spitfires), a tour on Mosquitoes and flying Lysanders into occupied France. A posting to a Tempest Sqn, a secondment to an American P38 Sqn to mention just a few of the plot lines.

They are available in the Amazon Kindle store and as soon as you look at the link you’ll see that there is a HUGE twist in the tale.

However, I found the author’s style of writing very immersive, so give them a try.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B08JC5MS...rwt_sb_pc_tukn
I'll check them out. They sound a bit like the George Yeoman books by Robert Jackson that I read eagerly as a child. The movement from one setting to another opens up a lot of scenarios. The Lysander one is very interesting.
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Old 25th Nov 2023, 10:30
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Smile

I’ve just finished ‘Eject Eject’ and I found it a very good read, indeed. Highly recommended.

Having worked on escape and survival systems for nearly 50 years - 11 of them in R&D with a well known purveyor of Gentleman’s (and now Ladies) explosive airborne furniture - I was particularly pleased to see John N has clearly explained the difficulties with integrating the ‘female’ (other genders are apparently now available!) form into a system designed specifically for males…..We got there eventually, though. 😉

I am now halfway through ‘Typhoon’ and so far, it’s a belter! Beautifully written, Holding even my wandering attention, it’s a page turner for sure one of the easiest reads I’ve had in years.

As a ‘vocational’ pilot myself and who served on the most prodigious of the Jaguar Sqns (II(AC)) Mike’s explanation of the many challenges facing Jag operators at the time is eye opening. I wonder how many of those challenges would have been solved if the Jag had continued in service with its proposed major upgrade in place? . However, It was so sad to see the hierarchies BOI default position - ‘pilot lost control’ - in many of the tragic losses experienced on the Force.

great stuff, both. 🫡 THANK YOU!
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Old 27th Nov 2023, 11:08
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“The Right of the Line,(The RAF in The European War 1939-45 )” by John Terraine

A tremendous, heart-warming story of the light blue. A masterful summary of operations and personnel, attitudes and heroism and duty at all levels. In it he argues cogently that the RAF took the traditional superior placing of “The Right of the Line”, because of its achievements and sacrifices in WW2. If you accept that then maybe you should also believe that the RAF should have taken over the position of Senior Service within the British Armed forces.

Sample quotefrom the final pages:

And what of the aircrew, the flyers, the ones who left their burnt bones scattered over all of Europe? In those young men we may discern the many faces of courage, the constitution of heroes: in lonely cockpits at dizzy altitudes, quartering the treacherous and limitless sea, searching the desert’s hostile glare, brushing the peaks of the high mountains, in the ferocity of low-level attack or the long, tense haul of a bombing mission, in fog, in deadly cold, in storm … on fire …in a prison camp… in a skin-grafting hospital … My title shows what I think of them: there is not prouder place, none deserving more honour, than the right of the line.

He does not neglect the groundcrew:

When we look below the ranks of the highest commanders, amid so much heroism, so much military virtue, it becomes invidious to start naming names. The overwhelming majority of the RAF’s million were to be found in the ground crew – that assembly of skilled, educated, individualistic, irreverent, dependable men without whose untiring labours the aircraft would not have flown, the operations would not have happened, the victory could never have been won, and this book would never have been written. The off-hand diffidence of their generation still caused many of them to brush aside their war service with comic or sardonic anecdotes, an attitude reflected in their scurrilous joyful songs , and summed up in what may almost be called the anthem of the “erks” – “Bless (or otherwise) ‘Em All”:
Many of them would rather die than admit to any pride in their part in what they liked to present as the most almighty F**k – Up from beginning to end. “Binding” every inch of the way, they made victory possible; they were splendid.
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Old 27th Nov 2023, 12:10
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Cheating Death - Combat Air Rescues in Vietnam and Laos. George J. Marrett

I found this an outstanding book.
A really interesting and capable "big-piston" aircraft doing an incredible job.
Well written, no histrionics. These guy's were brave and resourceful.

lsh

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Old 27th Nov 2023, 13:58
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Damned Lucky
Memoir (with a ghost writer) of an American B-17 pilot from WW II (my son in law met him in person a few years ago): John Luckadoo.
He really brings the gritty, visceral fear and anxiety of each mission (trying to get to 25 to rotate home before you die in a flaming wreck) of B-17 crews.
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Old 13th Apr 2024, 09:44
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Given the title of this thread, 'A very good military read', I felt it worthwhile highlighting that The Naval & Military Press website, a military book specialist with an incredibly broad range of titles, currently has some very worthwhile discounts on their extensive stock.

It was quite by chance this last week that I spotted a trio of books, on a subject that interests me. To then find I could acquire all three titles at discounts of between 62% and 70% off the published prices was a winner for me, so I bought them! Just to be clear, I have absolutely no connection with The Naval & Military Press, other than having purchased a few of their books in the past. With the readers of this thread being interested in military books, it seems only fair to pass the knowledge along.

The Naval & Military Press website is here: www.naval-military-press.com

The listing for the discounted books is here: www.naval-military-press.com/special-offers/

Those discounted titles still appear within the many and varied categories within which Naval & Military list their stock, so be sure to have a good browse through the website. For example, have a look at this post-World War 2 listing: www.naval-military-press.com/product-category/19th-20th-century/post-wwii/

Enjoy!

Last edited by MrBernoulli; 13th Apr 2024 at 12:14. Reason: Typos
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Old 13th Apr 2024, 14:15
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Thanks Mr B,for that `heads-up` website...
`Journeys Hazardous`,by Chris Bullock;Company Commander in 2/2 Gurkhas,during `Claret Operations` in Borneo 1965.

`Borneo Boys`,by Roger Annett,Helicopter Operations in Borneo during `Confrontasi` with Indonesia..

`Warburton`s War`,by Tony Spooner.WW2 ,`misfit` pilot to well-decorated `ace` recce pilot..
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Old 13th Apr 2024, 14:30
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Originally Posted by MightyGem
I’m going to go out on a limb here and recommend a series of novels by an ex AAC pilot, Karl Jackson, entitled, “Harry’s Game”.

Over 9 books, they follow the life of RAF pilot Harry Cornwall through WW2. Book One starts in France in Spring 1940 and covers the Battle of France and the retreat and evacuation from Dunkirk.

The following books include: the Battle of Britain, the early defence of Malta,(including Faith, Hope and Charity. Any author that does that has to worth a read), a flag waving tour of the USA, a second tour in Malta(flying reconnaissance in Martin Marylands and Spitfires), a tour on Mosquitoes and flying Lysanders into occupied France. A posting to a Tempest Sqn, a secondment to an American P38 Sqn to mention just a few of the plot lines.

They are available in the Amazon Kindle store and as soon as you look at the link you’ll see that there is a HUGE twist in the tale.

However, I found the author’s style of writing very immersive, so give them a try.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B08JC5MS...rwt_sb_pc_tukn
Given that twist, I think it would be hard to actually read them with any kind of seriousness.
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Old 6th Jul 2024, 19:32
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FOR RICHARD SHARPE FANS: Amazon are offering twenty one books of the series, all the way up to "Assassin" with beautiful artwork front covers in the new style, for less than £65 delivered.
I have replaced my battered old versions, bought one at a time over the years.
Delighted.
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Old 6th Jul 2024, 20:47
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The Damien Lewis series on the SAS/SBS/SOE et Al - every one excellent.
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Old 6th Jul 2024, 21:11
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Originally Posted by 212man
Given that twist, I think it would be hard to actually read them with any kind of seriousness.
Give it a try. The stories interweave with historical events very well.
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Old 7th Jul 2024, 09:45
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Originally Posted by 212man
Given that twist, I think it would be hard to actually read them with any kind of seriousness.
Sounds like a variation on the George Yeoman books by Robert Jackson that I enjoyed reading years ago, albeit with a twist. The authors share the same surname, I wonder if they are related?
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Old 8th Jul 2024, 03:25
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War for the hell of it

War for the Hell of It; a Fighter Pilot's View of Vietnam War for the Hell of It; a Fighter Pilot's View of Vietnam

By far the best book about what it was like to be a fighter pilot during the war in Vietnam,

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Old 9th Jul 2024, 16:29
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I thought it was a novel at first: Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare by Giles Milton tells the story of Resistance in the occupied countries during WW2. It's also the story of
Colin Gubbins, originator of many subversive operations who said that well-trained saboteurs with the load of one light bomber could do far more damage than fleets of heavies -- and proved his point to the fury of Sir Arthur Harris, who refused to part with even one bomber for Resistance work. The raid on the Norsk Hydro is a real nail-biter. Available on Kindle for only 99 pence ...
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Old 9th Jul 2024, 17:12
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Not sure if this book, “Unsung Eagles” by LtCol Jay Stout has already been recommended.

Well written, but little known stories of US WWII aviators based on personal interviews with his subjects, who were common men who did uncommon deeds of courage and skill. In his preface, “I can’t ever really understand the horrors and heartaches that these unsung eagles experienced. And I can’t even really understand the men themselves. But I can honor them with a record of who they were and what they did. “
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