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A very good military read

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A very good military read

Old 12th Apr 2021, 07:46
  #661 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: France
Posts: 145
I've just finished " Shadow divers" by Robert Kurson.ISBN0-375-76098-9 (paperback) OCLC60426012Dewey Decimal 910.452
It's a very gripping true story about a group of divers working at extreme depths ( for the time ) and their encounter with a Uboat found where there shouldn't be one.
Available from all good bookshops, Abe books (second hand ) and the Internet Archive https://archive.org/ to loan for 14 days. I found it hard to stop reading!

nb Internet Archive is hard to navigate but persevere and you will get a free read.
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Old 12th Apr 2021, 10:35
  #662 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2003
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Originally Posted by sidevalve View Post
I'm in the middle of "The Lonely Sea and the Sky" by Sir Francis Chichester. I'd always assumed he was "just" a yachtsman.. but his story is much, much more than that.
In 1929, he flew from England to Australia in a D H Gypsy Moth - then had it shipped to NZ from where he wanted to be the first to fly the Tasman Sea back to Oz (via Norfolk Island and Lord Howe Island..) For the navs out there, the section where he describes how he managed to fly the aeroplane and navigate using dead reckoning backed up with sun shots is absolutely incredible.. I won't give away any more of the flying side of the story. I've yet to start reading about his solo circumnavigation of the world in Gypsy Moth IV.
Totally agree. A very interesting individual.
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Old 12th Apr 2021, 12:10
  #663 (permalink)  
 
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I was on the Quay in Plymouth when Gypsy Moth was coming in. Suddenly his wife, who was wearing a brightly coloured Zoot Suit, started jumping up and down and waving.
Gypsy Moth suddenly came about in the harbour entrance and started heading back out to sea..
My mate then remarked.. " Looks like he's just remembered why he left in the first place!"
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Old 10th Jun 2021, 18:56
  #664 (permalink)  
 
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I enjoyed this look into RAF Pilot training in the early 1980’s. He also has an accompanying book about his previous assignment as an enlisted engineer on Vulcans.
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Old 10th Jun 2021, 19:00
  #665 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
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Does he say whether it was a hot buffet or just cold cuts and salad?
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Old 11th Jun 2021, 10:32
  #666 (permalink)  
Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
 
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Perhaps a Ploughman’s?
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Old 11th Jun 2021, 16:37
  #667 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
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Hostile Skies now available in Spanish, courtesy of publisher in Buenos Aires.

https://elcazadorlibros.com.ar/produ...elos-hostiles/

No feedback yet!

Mog
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Old 11th Jun 2021, 18:35
  #668 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
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Blimey! That’s brave!….I’d be very interested to see what kind of reception it gets. It’s a great book, but having spent a lot of time in Buenos Aires over the years, it doesn’t take much to set ‘em off!
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Old 11th Jun 2021, 18:45
  #669 (permalink)  
 
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There is a link to the Military Zone Forum where these comments were posted about the book (Google Translated from the Spanish) :-

spirit666



I finished reading "Hostile Skies" and I leave my comments because it is a book of three lucas and maybe this will help you decide to buy or spend that money on another book or something else. We all know Sun Tzu's phrase "If you want to know how you

did in the war, ask your enemy" Well, this is a book written by an English pilot.

With all that this implies and where it is quite difficult to be objective because there are many stories difficult to digest. It is a very well balanced book between the account of the actions and the feelings of Morgan himself. That he includes many letters to his family as well as to a former lover at first baffles, but then he makes much more sense by showing without any qualms his fears, fears, tiredness and the desire for everything to end as quickly as possible.
For Morgan as for the rest of the pilots, the war was a
job. An annoying, tiring and very dangerous job. Concepts such as patriotism, commitment or loyalty to their Queen are not mentioned on any page of the book, marking very clearly the substantial difference in values between our pilots and the English.
Some of the accounts of the attacks and the shoot-downs are
crude. Hurt. Morgan has not been deprived of anything, nor of venting the countless failures of the Sea Harrier, the lack of coordination in many missions or the little experience of some English pilots. The fear of the Exocet, the attacks of our aviation and the anti-aircraft defenses of Puerto Argentino are a constant.
There is abundant information of the attacks, tactics, strategy even technical data that allow to know very in depth the Sea Harrier as the weaponry
used. It touches on some sensitive issues with the filming of some shootdowns, the attack on The Narwal, the Condor air base or the effect of the Beluga bombs.
In short, a book that is different, difficult and hard for us but that allows us to revalue the actions, courage and heroism of our pilots, who were very close to complicating "the work" for the

English. And very close as perhaps in no other English book is reflected.
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FerTrucco

collaboratorAs Harrier pilots I read three books: Morgan's, Ward's and Pook's.
I share that Morgan's seems the most "experiential", in the sense that he relates both the actions of war and his own feelings, even going so far as to whitewash his personal "inner front" (lover). It also details some post-war aftermath for him.
The account of the actions of 8 June is very hard for us. I thought it was very good, if you want to read experiences from somewhere else.
I also thought pook's was pretty good. He is less passionate than Morgan, but relates quite well his involvement in the war.
And Ward's... His fame precedes him. He is quite superb, hyper critical of the RAF. If you manage to get the whole facet out of your ego, it's also worth reading.
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k'pla

Morgan is the wretched one who in the account of the fighting on June 8, indicates that when he saw the destruction of the Foxtrot boat, he wanted to kill the pilot because he deserved it and when he saw the ejection of this, I wish he was not saved?
Or I'm wrong???

Thanks
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spirit666

k'pla said:
Morgan is the wretched one who in the account of the fighting on June 8, indicates that when he saw the destruction of the Foxtrot boat, he wanted to kill the pilot because he deserved it and when he saw the ejection of this, I wish he was not saved?
Or I'm wrong???

Thanks
By training and belief no Argentine pilot has made public his thoughts and feelings when attacking a frigate or destroyer. That doesn't take away from the fact that several had in mind to "collect some outstanding debt" for a colleague who was no longer there.
Such is
war. Of all the worst, the worst.
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Cat

k'pla said:
Morgan is the wretched one who in the account of the fighting on June 8, indicates that when he saw the destruction of the Foxtrot boat, he wanted to kill the pilot because he deserved it and when he saw the ejection of this, I wish he was not saved?
Or I'm wrong???

Thanks
which pilot is the one that ejects? velazco ?

greetings

k'pla

I think it was the Ten Arraras
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cosmiccomet74

collaborator
collaboratorFerTrucco said:
As Harrier pilots I read three books: Morgan's, Ward's and Pook's.
I share that Morgan's seems the most "experiential", in the sense that he relates both the actions of war and his own feelings, even going so far as to whitewash his personal "inner front" (lover). It also details some post-war aftermath for him.
The account of the actions of 8 June is very hard for us. I thought it was very good, if you want to read experiences from somewhere else.
I also thought pook's was pretty good. He is less passionate than Morgan, but relates quite well his involvement in the war.
And Ward's... His fame precedes him. He is quite superb, hyper critical of the RAF. If you manage to get the whole facet out of your ego, it's also worth reading.Beyond the combat of June 8, our Military Airmen were attacking, it was them or us.
What if it has NOTHING of chivalry was the attack on the Narwal.
The insanity that these two SHR had, one of them commanded by David Morgan, with an unarmed ship sailing at very few knots... they could have been approached by the British Sea King, as they eventually did.
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Old 19th Jun 2021, 13:37
  #670 (permalink)  
 
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Encouraging reaction from La Nacion (Argentina) and El Pais (Spain). Also, good vibes from some Argentine pilots who were there.

https://www.lanacion.com.ar/sociedad...s-nid14062021/

https://elpais.com/internacional/202...-malvinas.html
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Old 19th Jun 2021, 14:01
  #671 (permalink)  
 
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WWII story of the rescue of downed Allied Aircrew from Yugoslavia by the American OSS and Partisan groups....using C-47 Transports landing on a hand cleared airstrip.

Very little notice was given for the gallantry of so many who risked their lives to see to the safe return of so many airmen.

It also discusses the politics that existed that hampered the safe return of downed aircrew and the later Communist takeover under Tito which led to the arrest, trial, and execution of the leader of the partisan group that was so instrumental in the safeguarding and tranposrt of those rescued.

"The Forgotten 500". by Gregory A. Freeman

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