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Jetstar CEO Interview

Old 16th Sep 2012, 09:36
  #41 (permalink)  
 
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JH - responsible for the overall group strategy over the last two years.

Would that be the disastrous Industrial Strategy which lead to the grounding of the airline?

Last edited by Mstr Caution; 16th Sep 2012 at 09:37.
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Old 16th Sep 2012, 13:24
  #42 (permalink)  
 
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Monumental Error

I notice that the posts so far have missed the point.

This is a monumental mistake by Joyce as I said with my earlier post.
The point is that he might seem devious and manipulative, but that's giving him too much credit.
Hrdlicka has managed to convince him that she has the "right stuff". So much so that he has been willing to allow her the luxury of family time of her own choosing with the assurance that at those times she will delegate her tasks and duties to the right people to carry out. She might be a good worker but not good enough for this gig.
The thread should be focusing on Joyce and his inability to make the right decisions.
To appoint Hrdlicka as CEO of Jetstar is another monumental error of judgement by Joyce. Sooner or later things will unravel once more and if Joyce is still at the helm he'll stuff it up again.
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Old 16th Sep 2012, 22:44
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Originally Posted by AEROMEDIC View Post
Hrdlicka has managed to convince him that she has the "right stuff". So much so that he has been willing to allow her the luxury of family time of her own choosing with the assurance that at those times she will delegate her tasks and duties to the right people to carry out.
There is very little truth behind this article. It's an advertisement. It's designed to manipulate public opinion.

I wouldn't like to be in her position over the coming year. If she is a hard working exec she will fight it out and sacrifice her family. If she puts her family first she will probably quit within a year.
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Old 16th Sep 2012, 22:51
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I agree that this is one more piece of evidence that Joyce is incompetent. So what? That particular dead horse has been flogged to jelly. We all know, and are weary of that sad truth.

Hrdlicka is the new kid in town, and all we have is this fluff piece positioned by the Grupenliars. She will sink or swim on her own merits;either way we'll then get a chance to pillory her for sport and angst relief.

D18S
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Old 17th Sep 2012, 03:48
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The biggest risk to Jetstar, is not coming from how hard the multiple Qantas group CEO's work.
It will be how cost are apportioned between group companies.
Jetstar's future domestic growth will be dependant upon the amount of money Singapore is willing to 'invest in/grow' Tiger. Remember in the low cost segment, he who has the lowest cost wins in the end. As for Jetstar's international ops, success will be dependant on how willing QF continues to be to support the various entities if the competition makes it difficult.
The only good thing I can see coming from this segmented business model with multiple CEO's, is that individual CEO's may want costs apportioned more realistically.
If Jane wants to pick up her kids from school, it won't be Jetstar's downfall.
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Old 17th Sep 2012, 11:58
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Originally Posted by -438 View Post
As for Jetstar's international ops, success will be dependant on how willing QF continues to be to support the various entities if the competition makes it difficult.
The only good thing I can see coming from this segmented business model with multiple CEO's, is that individual CEO's may want costs apportioned more realistically.
So there is a changing strategy for the group. New CEOs that want costs apportioned more realistically (an interesting concept). We have a change in numbers on the executive (favoring Qf mainline). The new jetstar CEO starts softening jetstar's slave labor image.

I smell bad news heading jetstars way
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Old 17th Sep 2012, 12:47
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The biggest risk to Jetstar, is not coming from how hard the multiple Qantas group CEO's work.
The larger risk is the September EK/QF merger deal which didn't have any Jetstar branding in sight.

It will be how cost are apportioned between group companies.
Already happening between LH & SH Mainline fleets. Hotel accommodation & allowances correctly apportioned.

Jetstar's future domestic growth will be dependant upon the amount of money Singapore is willing to 'invest in/grow' Tiger. Remember in the low cost segment, he who has the lowest cost wins in the end. As for Jetstar's international ops, success will be dependant on how willing QF continues to be to support the various entities if the competition makes it difficult.
That QF support will depend on Tim Clark's view of the global aviation scene. He was the competition.

I smell bad news heading jetstars way.
I reckon AJ asked JH to fill the JQ CEO role cause no other players were champing at the bit to fill it. The interviews went on to outline how surprised JH was with the job offer & how she asked AJ if she could take some time to think about the offer. LS has been around, he's got LC on his side he was a shoe in for the LH or SH business CEO. Simon Hickey was making coin for the Qantas Group as CEO Frequent Flyer. Both LS & SH were known entities around Qantas. When the new CEO for JQ was announced people were saying Jayne who?

Last edited by Mstr Caution; 17th Sep 2012 at 12:52.
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Old 17th Sep 2012, 13:08
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We legacy folk have long suspected JQ's financial viability once the crutch was kicked from under their arms. We seem to be on the eve of that event. Other carriers have abandonded their LCC projects once it became obvious they canabalised the main business.

Now that DJ is gong mainstream there is less rationale for JQ in its present scope. Certainly long haul/widebody LCC seems to be a dud model everywhere its tried. Absent the silent subsidies from QF LH it might be sooner than later that JQ contracts its LH operations. There will always be a strong Bali/Phuket/Boganville (spelling intentional) market, but that's about it.

I imagine that PHNL will become a daily QF operation soon...its a natural EK codeshare extension. As is SFO, but that is clearly too much to hope for.

As far as JH being surprised at the offer of the JQ CEO role: when I was an enforcer for the mob in Cleveland we had a saying...if you don't know who's the patsy in the room, it's you.

Vinnie
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Old 17th Sep 2012, 13:22
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There is money in the cost side of the business, however, the real money is in the revenue side.

Say, for example, a pax wanted to fly SYD-SIN-KUL return and paid $1800 for the ticket. The SIN-KUL return is (rounded up) 5% of the distance travelled. How would you determine the revenue split between QF and JQ Asia for the ticket?

There are many examples where the revenue is not what would seem logical and it is done for many reasons. However it may further cloud the real performance of a business if those making all of the decisions are not across the detail.
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Old 17th Sep 2012, 16:13
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Oh sure, revenue is always where the action is: follow the money. The reason frequent flyer makes money, and long haul does not? Revenue sharing. The reason package sales do well but carriers do not? Ditto. The reason I wear Armani and my wife rags? You guessed it!
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Old 18th Sep 2012, 01:23
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Say, for example, a pax wanted to fly SYD-SIN-KUL return and paid $1800 for the ticket. The SIN-KUL return is (rounded up) 5% of the distance travelled. How would you determine the revenue split between QF and JQ Asia for the ticket?
In the IATA fare construction days the eastern seaboard round to ADL was common rated from Europe (mainly 'cos you had to go via SYD) and TN plus AN charged full Y sector fare. Many a tour operator had tickets issued from Europe to ADL but travelled as far as say MEB and had the MEBADL sector re-issued to an Misc Charges Order later used to pay some of the accommodation charges for the group!! And they got away with it!!

Last edited by Animalclub; 18th Sep 2012 at 01:23.
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Old 21st Sep 2012, 00:42
  #52 (permalink)  
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Jazzing up the Jet

AFR BOSS Magazine

When Jayne Hrdlicka told her young sons she had a new job running an airline they got a bit worried. “How can you be the boss of an airline when you can’t fly a plane?” they asked.

Actually, there are quite a lot of other skills Hrdlicka needs for her new role as chief executive of the Qantas budget carrier, Jetstar. The former management consultant and Qantas strategy executive will be using every bit of her experience managing change and customer-led growth as she settles into the role at a hard time.

In the domestic arena, Jetstar is facing a *reinvigorated Virgin Australia, led by former Qantas executive John Borghetti. Along with parent Qantas, Jetstar is fighting to maintain the 65 per cent domestic market share it deems *crucial to maintaining the full-service airline’s premium over rival Virgin Australia.

The domestic business is under huge pressure to deliver as its international business takes a beating. Qantas International last month posted an annual loss of $450 million, pushing the airline to a $245 million loss – its first in 17 years since it was privatised and publicly listed.

Jetstar’s relatively low cost base is a huge advantage as it also pushes into the Asian region. But anyone who has flown the airline knows cheap has not made for an especially cheerful flying experience.
Sitting down with BOSS  just a few weeks after taking over from chief executive of four years Bruce Buchanan, Hrdlicka makes it clear that customer and employee relations need more work. “The thing we have invested in and *doubled down on is safety,” she says.

“But the things we have done less well, clearly, is on the customer front and I don’t think we have put our people as forward as we could have . . . It takes time. There’s some quick things we can do. But everybody has a bad Jetstar story and bad ones stick with you and get talked about . . . It’s all the classic stuff we have to do.”

Domestic growth is still a priority, with further increases in capacity planned as appropriate, she says, which will provide a challenge to competitors. “We’re lucky because strategically we can work hand-in-hand with Qantas . . . the more *premium full-service marketplace has a much different cost structure . . . with the Qantas brand we are very focused about where we put it and how we develop it. We are not worried about the low fare model because we have that already.”

Although consumer sentiment in recent months has been wobbly due to the global *outlook, spending on recreational travel has been relatively unscathed.

“In a funny way leisure travel has benefited from that. We continually evaluate where the demand is and where we fly . . . and putting *supply back into the mix.

“The strength of the Australian dollar is *making some markets more attractive. We will continue to open up the low fares market in *Australia – there are growth rates in that part of the market which are very attractive.”

There will be a lot of airline consolidation across Asia, Hrdlicka says, and the longer-term goal is for Jetstar is to be the major low-cost brand in the region. Jetstar is rapidly pushing into Asia. It has offshoots in Vietnam, Singapore, and Japan, and is seeking approval from regulators for a new *venture based in Hong Kong.

“We are just about to finalise a very detailed shareholder agreement with our partner China Eastern . . . once we incorporate the business in Hong Kong we can begin actively to get the business operational this financial year,” Hrdlicka says. “We have huge growth in front of us, and the relationship with China Eastern is very important for Qantas group. Japan should be one of our biggest businesses and could be as big as the Australian business if we succeed.”

On the industrial relations front, she says, *Jetstar faces a different landscape from Qantas.

“It’s a lot simpler because our agreements are five, six or seven years old at the most. If you look at the pilot EBA [enterprise bargaining agreement], Qantas’ is hundreds of pages and Jetstar’s is a handful of pages. I’ve spent my first seven or eight weeks in the business talking to lots of *people and to pilots. Some of the Jetstar pilots were Qantas pilots who have elected to take leave without pay and work for Jetstar. There are *different opportunities in Jetstar because of our growth and culture.”

Jetstar, which was launched in 2004, was of course designed to be entrepreneurial with a *relatively flat structure. It was Alan Joyce’s domain for five years before he became Qantas chief executive in 2008.

A native of the US midwest, Hrdlicka was raised in a successful immigrant family which stressed the importance of hard work. Her father had defected from the Czech Republic and believed strongly in the right to choose and be your best.

After a career in management consulting and business in the US, Hrdlicka moved here in 1994 to run a company (Dynamic Marketing), against the advice of her parents. “You get an itch to reorient your perspective . . . I always said I’d stay [in Australia] five or six years.”

Having already worked with Bain in America, Hrdlicka joined the firm here and spent 11 years as a partner. “Consulting is a great way to have a family and after I went back to Bain, two kids, two dogs and an Australian husband later . . . I thought about going back to the US but couldn’t work out where I would go. Lifestyle and family balance also came into it.”

Joyce was a client when Hrdlicka was a partner at Bain and she says he’s been an important mentor. “I wouldn’t have come to Qantas except for him and the very *capable leaders he has,” she says.

It was in early 2010 that Joyce got in touch with Hrdlicka to discuss a possible role at the airline. “Alan and I had been speaking since *February. It took us three to four months and I agreed I would come to *Qantas . . . it took to the end of June to take that decision. So I had the conversation with the partners at Bain . . . and I resigned and the next day I got a call from [headhunters] Egon Zehnder and they said ‘would you consider a role on the Woolworths board?’. [Woolworths chair] James Strong had no idea I was in discussion with Alan – he was my first client when I came back to Bain and Woolworths was my *second.”

Hrdlicka’s US experience running operations for SkyBox, which produced basketball and football trading cards, and with Bain clients forged a down-to-earth, results-driven style.

“What I think differentiated me was I knew how to solve problems and felt well qualified to manage what came at me,” she says. “I know enough to ask the right *questions and get the right people in the room and the specialists . . . there’s always a way to work through it. I have an inclusive style and I like to understand other people’s views. I’m not big on hierarchy and don’t like lots of *layers. I like to have the analysis.”

The years at Bain gave Hrdlicka the chance to get deeply into what she describes as the “consumer experience’’. “If you really understand what drives *revenue then you understand customers, which investment to make and how to run a really profitable business. If you don’t understand that it’s hard to make the trade-offs.”

Running a budget airline in Australia is a very different thing to running the strategy function for Qantas and being a consultant.

While it’s not exactly a trend yet, *Hrdlicka’s move from consulting through to the CEO office – she admits she didn’t expect to move quite so quickly – is similar to the path by Commonwealth Bank’s CEO Ian Narev, who was a McKinsey consultant before heading up strategy at CBA.

“I don’t see why we wouldn’t see more [such appointments] in the future,” she says. “We’re in times of change and businesses need to seek more diversity and having a different mix of people in your business, and moving them around inside your business, is a really good thing.”

There were benefits from spending two years building the strategy arm for *Qantas. The business had been “over-*consulted and was hungry for a different way”.

“There was a heavy reliance on consultants. It’s pretty hypocritical now to say but a company needs its own capability. You need to challenge convention from within and not to have that fully outside the company.

“It didn’t have a centre of excellence and in the last couple of years we built great capability.”
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Old 21st Sep 2012, 00:55
  #53 (permalink)  
 
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her son is pretty switched on

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Old 21st Sep 2012, 04:46
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Another fluff piece about the change to jetstar industrial relations. Jetstar is so warm and cuddly. So is this aimed at the staff, the government, the regulator, the public, the investors or emirates?

I thought Qantas was customer focused and jetstar was cost focused? It's always a good business strategy to completely confuse your brands a customers.

Last edited by golfjet744; 21st Sep 2012 at 19:22.
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Old 21st Sep 2012, 09:43
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The years at Bain gave Hrdlicka the chance to get deeply into what she describes as the “consumer experience’’. “If you really understand what drives *revenue then you understand customers, which investment to make and how to run a really profitable business. If you don’t understand that it’s hard to make the trade-offs.”
There is nothing in her statements to say what steps she has taken to understand the people who DELIVER the needs of the customers.
The first step to take by someone who heads up a business is to ensure that the service, product, etc. is provided satisfactorily, on time and cost effective.
This cannot be done without all the employees happily contributing along the way.

Hrdlicka should delve into what makes staff passionate and proud to deliver the services and restore what once was, to what should be.
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Old 21st Sep 2012, 10:44
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In the words of a consultant.....
“There was a heavy reliance on consultants. It’s pretty hypocritical now to say but a company needs its own capability. You need to challenge convention from within and not to have that fully outside the company.
Gold.

"now that I'm not a consultant, consultants are a waste of money...."
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Old 21st Sep 2012, 11:32
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"now that I'm not a consultant, consultants are a waste of money...."
Yep, you are right, feckin' hypocrites
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