Airlines, Airports & Routes Topics about airports, routes and airline business.

Manchester-3

Old 31st Dec 2021, 11:49
  #941 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: 2DME
Posts: 177
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Dont try logic or reasoning. It seems to go over both Navpi and Ozzys head. Rather than recognise the fact that Manchester will enjoy a couple of dozen new new routes in 2022 plus steady growth by EasyJet, Ryanair and Jet2, they preferred to criticise for not building a business based on taking a handful of Ryanair diversions from Leeds or a few ad hoc freight flights.
AndrewH52 is offline  
Old 31st Dec 2021, 12:27
  #942 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Eas Anglia
Age: 63
Posts: 670
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by AndrewH52 View Post
Dont try logic or reasoning. It seems to go over both Navpi and Ozzys head. Rather than recognise the fact that Manchester will enjoy a couple of dozen new new routes in 2022 plus steady growth by EasyJet, Ryanair and Jet2, they preferred to criticise for not building a business based on taking a handful of Ryanair diversions from Leeds or a few ad hoc freight flights.
A couple of dozen you say, that's excellent, if you can provide a comprehensive list that would be excellent.

If its based on proposals via ACL i suspect that's merely crystal ball gazing.

Regarding freight, nothing to be concerned about here although we are 40% down on freight, not that it matters as there is of course no money in that business anyway.







Navpi is offline  
Old 31st Dec 2021, 14:54
  #943 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: stockport
Posts: 361
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
There are a lot of new schedules that are bookable with Ryanair and Easyjet plus quite a few others.
Cargo is mainly underbelly so therefore is down as the number of schedule services is down. when the cargo has to unloaded by hand as did the B777 in Liverpool
it is time and labour intensive (12 hours per flight) it is quite likely that none of the handling agent wanted it.
chaps1954 is online now  
Old 31st Dec 2021, 15:18
  #944 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Cheshire
Posts: 1,156
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Two points briefly on new routes.
Firstly, we need to see the final picture much closer to the start of the summer schedules. It's true that the initial ACL report did show additional based a/c for Ryanair and easyjet compared to where we were in 2019, and we live in hope that will come to pass, if only partially.

Secondly, although some new routes have been formally announced and are bookable, there are some existing pre-covid routes and initially planned new ones that appear at present not to be operating in S22. Ultimately it's the net position and capacity by the number of seats that will show whether or not growth by specific airlines is reflected in the schedules.
MANFOD is offline  
Old 31st Dec 2021, 15:33
  #945 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: SYD
Posts: 378
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
QUOTE: "I do not know, or care."

Oh WOW. That is Manchester's problem right there. Neatly summarised in six short words.

Thankyou, HOVIS. I take it that you are a MAN-based handling agent, then? Or have experience of the role?

But whilst I don't doubt the issues you identify, I do differ from you on how MAG and their onsite handling agency partners should respond to them.

Let's analyse the points you raise.

"Maybe other airports have free stands available, maybe they have fewer peaks and troughs."

This issue is best addressed by implementation of a dynamic diversion policy (which is the way most airports do address stand availability). Airport operators issue advice to ATC and operators along the lines of we can accommodate one more widebody and upto three aircraft of A321/B738 size. This process ensures that the airport can make best use of available resources, yet not become overloaded beyond their capability. It maximises the revenue opportunity, which is a good thing for all concerned. A blanket "NO DIVS" notam offers none of this flexibility. It is a blunt instrument, inappropriate for use at a major airport for days and weeks at a time. An advisory of this sort should only be used when exceptional circumstances dictate, and that should apply for a matter of hours only and be subject to regular review. Remember that handling agents are not the only folks to be considered in this loop. When the largest airport in Northern England refuses all diversions, do you realise the pressure this places on ATC, amongst others? Other agencies have to deal with the fallout. They don't have the option to shrug their shoulders and look the other way. And they aren't overrun with extra staff on call either.

"The handling agents right now, today, do not have enough staff to offer the type of diversion availability you want."

Do you speak for all handling agents on the campus? When a Jet2 flight which had recently departed MAN asked to return, they fell foul of the no divs notam and were turned away by default. But Jet2 self-handles at MAN. They wouldn't ask to come back to MAN if they were unable to handle their own aircraft on site. So again, a dynamic diversion policy would address this. If Jet2 are able to service their own diverted aircraft, allow them the flexibility to do so. That doesn't impact other handling companies which don't have the resources to cope, does it? But the blanket no divs notam allows no discretion to those operators which can cope. Let them do their job on their own terms.

As for not having enough staff, there are ways to address this. At MAN, the ingrained culture seems to be that nothing can be done, or perhaps we don't know or care. The solution is actually to recruit sufficient staff to cope with the business opportunity which an airport the size of MAN offers. And to motivate those staff with appropriate terms and conditions. Yes, I am aware of the race to the bottom which has resulted in the collapse of staff morale amongst handling agents, and across other departments at MAN. Demotivated, miserable staff won't go the extra mile to help when the need arises. They won't pitch in for overtime shifts when they're desperately needed. They say things like we don't know, or care. But this mindset should not be allowed to prevail unaddressed. A good management team will bring all interested parties together to resolve a situation of this sort for the long-term benefit of the airport operation as a whole. MAG in particular needs to address this, because we are not seeing these problems on anything like this scale at other similar airports. And I very much doubt that handling agency staff at competing airports are on significantly better pay, terms and conditions than their MAN-based counterparts. So the problem is Manchester-specific.

"All of this takes resources."

Of course. Things don't happen by magic on an airport campus. If the airport suffers a chronic shortage of contact stands on a routine basis, that is an issue which senior management should be addressing. Mr Cornish, Ms Smart ... over to you! Baggage teams unavailable due to being deployed on earlier aircraft. This again relates to understaffing ... an issue which can and should be addressed. The solution to this should not be beyond the wit of any self-respecting manager.

"Many aircraft are going out less than half full. It's a mess."

I acknowledge this and agree with you. Not only are the aircraft half full, there are far fewer of them! The mismanagement of C-19 by inept and cowardly politicians has reaped devastation across this industry above all. The lack of help for aviation in the UK from HMG has been shameful. But it's always darkest before the dawn, and pandemic restrictions cannot last for ever. Politicians who seek re-election cannot abuse their voters indefinitely. And there is certainly huge pent-up travel demand awaiting the day that border restrictions are removed, pointless testing is axed, and the uncertainty of crazed kneejerk quarantine orders are removed from the equation. Our industry needs to be ready for this, ahead of the curve. Management teams must think ahead and train up staff now ... how ever challenging that may be financially. Because - perhaps as soon as Easter 2022 - restriction-free travel will return. Management at MAN needs to make sure that the entire campus is ready for this, inhouse staff and and partner agencies alike. Yes, it will require money, investment and close liaison with other agencies on campus. But the airport must prepare now. This is the key challenge which Mr Cornish, Ms Smart and their business partners must prepare for. It will be quite the challenge.

In answer to GrahamK: I believe that the taxiway realignment work at MAN is largely complete now. If I'm mistaken, others can correct me, but I'm not under the impression that large-scale work-in-progress is impacting apron availability at this point.

And to Andrew H52: Your posting is gratuitously abusive, but that reflects on you. However, your advocacy for Liverpool Airport is a common theme amongst your posts. When MAN turns away business, whether potential diversions or a series of cargo flights such as Nordwind, much of that business ends up at LPL. Those new routes which MAN does welcome will have been secured in spite of the long furlough of the marketing team. We know that opportunities were missed during their absence (Vueling, Transavia, others?). Competing airports benefitted from that own goal. So your motive in cheerleading the status quo is transparent. But contributors such as Navpi and myself will continue to encourage MAG management to address the challenges which the airport faces head-on. My posting record shows that I give praise where it is deserved and criticism where it is justified. The weakspots which I highlight to managers at MAN are very specific, not generic. A good management team should be motivated to address them. They should strive to make MAN the best it can be. I won't apologise for urging them to do that.
OzzyOzBorn is offline  
Old 31st Dec 2021, 16:17
  #946 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Where ever I am
Posts: 83
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
An excellent and well thought-out response Ozzy.

I can only hope that MAG/MAN management read these constructive posts and possibly manage to respond, in some way, to Ozzy's post.


Sioltach Dubh Glas is offline  
Old 31st Dec 2021, 16:59
  #947 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Cheshire
Posts: 1,156
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Sioltach Dubh Glas View Post
An excellent and well thought-out response Ozzy.

I can only hope that MAG/MAN management read these constructive posts and possibly manage to respond, in some way, to Ozzy's post.
Agreed! Some contributors on here, and I include myself, have been regular, even frequent, users of MAN, and / or enthusiasts and / or employed at the airport for decades. We appreciate its history and why it was Manchester that through hard work and ambition achieved just shy of 30m passengers in 2019 rather than Birmingham or any other non-London airport. Getting MAN designated as an International Gateway airport rather than just Prestwick outside of London in the 80's was no mean feat; nor was the intense lobbying by management of government and the DfT in the early 80's to break the barrier of bilateral agreements that eventually succeeded in seeing American and Singapore start flights to MAN. I know that at least 1 occasional contributor on here was involved in those negotiations. It showed ambition and determination. And later there was the meticulous planning and the battle won for the second runway.

It's against this background that folk like Ozzy and Navpi as well as myself get frustrated by the perceived complacency reflected in more recent times on certain issues, which makes us question why that ambition and 'can do' mentality of years past is seemingly no longer there. I agree the TP is a major project for which the airport management deserves credit, and it's unfortunate that covid has delayed completion of aspects of it such as piers 2 & 3 or the opening of airline lounges. But Ozzy is right - there are issues which could, and must, be addressed, and solutions found, in liaison with its airport partners. It's not just a case of complaining but trying to offer constructive criticism.

Last edited by MANFOD; 31st Dec 2021 at 20:53.
MANFOD is offline  
Old 31st Dec 2021, 19:24
  #948 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Northumberland
Posts: 7,261
Received 7 Likes on 5 Posts
When the largest airport in Northern England refuses all diversions, do you realise the pressure this places on ATC, amongst others? Other agencies have to deal with the fallout. They don't have the option to shrug their shoulders and look the other way. And they aren't overrun with extra staff on call either.
Declaring your unavailability in advance should actually help ATC and the airlines - crews won't plan for MAN as an alternate. What is worse is saying your available but then having to turn flights away at the last minute, creating additional workload for crews and ATC replanning.

Running short of ground crew because of flights not running to schedule is nothing new - I remember running around like a blue a*sed fly 40 years when everything turned to sh*t, as my supervisor used to so eloquently put it. It's not just about good management, somebody has to pay for the system to be running with sufficient flex to cope with additional flights. BTW, the main restraining factor for us taking diversions years ago used to be availablity of coaches for onward transport...
SWBKCB is online now  
Old 31st Dec 2021, 20:05
  #949 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Risn Dubh
Posts: 1,344
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
When LHR, LGW or DUB close for whatever reason, ourselves in ATC know MAN won't be helping out. SNN, BFS, the Scottish and other London airports will happily take whatever they can, as will DUB if it isn't the one closed. The airlines/crews are the ones who make the decision on where to go ultimately and that decision needs to be made relatively quickly. This has been the case for years now. I remember some poor AA 777 5 years or so ago couldn't get in to LHR due crosswinds after 2 go arounds. MAN was his filed alternate, he wanted to head up for a splash and dash, MAN couldn't take him. He ended up in DUB out of hours and everyone had to overnight. Skipper was spitting venom I believe.

Last edited by Una Due Tfc; 1st Jan 2022 at 01:22.
Una Due Tfc is offline  
Old 31st Dec 2021, 20:14
  #950 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: SYD
Posts: 378
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
SWBKCB - It is all a matter of timescale. ATC does not require two weeks notice that an airport is unavailable for diversions. Dynamic information is the norm. Diversions are almost always a last minute decision. Far better to have the major airport pitch in and help out with such extra traffic as it can accommodate, rather than to just shrug the shoulders and pass the buck to other agencies. If they accept half of the aircraft needing to divert, that is half the problem resolved. It really helps. Those aircraft are safely out of the system. Better to deal with the few which can't be accepted in the end than with the entire disrupted flight programme.

Ultimately, we're talking about an inter-connected system here. Flights rejected by MAN have to be vectored to other alternate airports. That is extra workload. And those aircraft will require the services of a handling agent wherever they do end up. Probably staffed by workers employed on similar T&C's to those at MAN. With all the same concerns. If the largest airport routinely shirks its share of the workload, that stresses every other agency in the system. It is not something to flaunt with a smirk and a sense of entitlement. It is the main reason that MAN has become a joke within the industry: "The airport which likes to say NO".

It's not good enough.

One final point here. Most replies have followed up on the issue of MAN refusing diversions. But my original post wasn't primarily about diversions at all. It was about the "no-can-do" culture which has become pervasive across several departments within the MAN operation. The no-divs policy is just one symptom of that. Many employees seem to brandish their bolshie 'not my problem' attitude with pride. That is a cancer on the operation, and it is a problem which has grown exponentially under Mr Cornish's leadership. Many staff don't feel valued for whatever reason, and they have withdrawn their goodwill in consequence. Some appear to take pride in being uncooperative and looking out for their own narrow interests alone. There is no team ethos. It is a major concern, and one which I would like to see Mr Cornish and Ms Smart actively address, along with partner agencies across the airport complex.
OzzyOzBorn is offline  
Old 1st Jan 2022, 08:16
  #951 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Northumberland
Posts: 7,261
Received 7 Likes on 5 Posts
We'll have to agree to disagree - from my point of view it's better to have as much certainty in the system as early as possible. Better to say you can't take anything than to have to turn a/c away at the last minute. It's the last minute changes and re-planning which cause stress and uncertainty and needs to be reduced .

Last edited by SWBKCB; 1st Jan 2022 at 09:12.
SWBKCB is online now  
Old 1st Jan 2022, 08:27
  #952 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Beyond the Blue Horizon
Age: 62
Posts: 1,067
Received 24 Likes on 9 Posts
ozzyozBorn
I am a regular (twice a week normally) user of the airport, and would concur with your thoughts on the no can do attitude that pervades the place now, along with some pretty rude, and obviously de motivated staff in customer facing roles, which is never going to end well.

Cheers
Mr Mac
Mr Mac is offline  
Old 1st Jan 2022, 09:21
  #953 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Cheshire
Posts: 1,156
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by SWBKCB View Post
We'll have to agree to disagree - from my point of view it's better to have as much certainty in the system as early as possible. Better to say you can't take anything than to have 20 a/c plan you as alternate and then have to turn half of them away at the last minute. It's the last minute changes and re-planning which cause stress and uncertainty and needs to be reduced .
I accept the logic in your argument to a degree but it doesn't answer some basic questions: -
Why is it MAN, an international airport that claims it is capable of handling up to 50m passengers a year, that feels the need to do this so often - and it's not just something that's arisen because of covid?
Why is the blanket notam issued for extended periods? The one issued 20 December until today has now been renewed for another week. No surprise there!

With cat 3B available at many airports and with modern a/c and crew so validated, the mass diversions of the 70s and 80s are now a very rare occurrence in the UK. It takes heavy snow fall, storm force winds or a blocked runway to cause major problems. As ozzy points out, in today's dynamic age of technology and instant information, a few diversions from LBA or BHX occasionally shouldn't really be a big headache from a pilot or ATC perspective.

That doesn't solve the problems on the ground with GHAs, airport staff, T & Cs, attitudes etc, and as has been said, those issues can't simply be left to simmer. They have to be addressed and solutions found. To reiterate, the 'no diversions' policy is simply one example of what many perceive as a negative mentality prevailing at MAN.



MANFOD is offline  
Old 1st Jan 2022, 09:34
  #954 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Northumberland
Posts: 7,261
Received 7 Likes on 5 Posts
Thanks - I was merely addressing Navpi's and Ozzy's comments re ATC stresses and safety and the diversion policy. I expect the rest of the issues are around incessant outsourcing and sub-contracting, which makes Ozzy's team ethos "difficult" - with MAN's size being a disadvantage in this area against the smaller competitors he references. Its not all about leadership and management, funding is needed as well.
SWBKCB is online now  
Old 1st Jan 2022, 10:41
  #955 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: UK
Posts: 2,623
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Mr Mac View Post
ozzyozBorn
I am a regular (twice a week normally) user of the airport, and would concur with your thoughts on the no can do attitude that pervades the place now, along with some pretty rude, and obviously de motivated staff in customer facing roles, which is never going to end well.

Cheers
Mr Mac
If you pay peanuts you inevitably wind up employing monkeys (with apologies to our primate cousins). If you then proceed to run them ragged and treat them like sh1t you get the results you describe.

That's not singling out MAN in particular but is a reference to how the service users, corporate or end users demand a service but are unwilling to pay the full price for it.
ATNotts is online now  
Old 1st Jan 2022, 17:57
  #956 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: SYD
Posts: 378
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Better to say you can't take anything than to have to turn a/c away at the last minute.
I can see where we are misunderstanding each other here. I have no objection to an airport advising that it can't accept diversions, eg. because it is already full, or due to a closed runway etc. In this situation, advance notice can only be a positive thing. The difference arises when the actual word we should be using is won't. That is a different matter entirely. MAN's stand availability is not 100% bulked-out. Busy, but not full. And whilst some handling agents may indeed be working at capacity, I cite again the example of Jet2 who self-handle at MAN. If they want to divert their own aircraft in and feel they have the means to self-handle them, why is a faceless airport official pushing out a piece of paper two weeks beforehand removing their discretion to do that? It makes no sense.

A dynamic diversion policy offering discretion to operators is what is needed here, and it is the way things are done at almost every other major airport. A discretionary policy does not mean the airport becoming swamped, it means accepting what can be accommodated and refusing only those which really can't (as opposed to everything, by default).

Most diversions arise at short notice anyway, so airports and agencies do not need to know the specifics days in advance, nor is that possible. A broad seasonal diversion plan should cover the essentials at this time of year.
OzzyOzBorn is offline  
Old 1st Jan 2022, 21:44
  #957 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Blighty
Posts: 583
Likes: 0
Received 17 Likes on 7 Posts
The airport IS full. There are still lots of parked aircraft around. It does not matter if Jet2 self handle or not, they don't have their own stands, they are a shared resource. When we stop towing the early arrivals off stand only to tow them back again 3 hrs later, just to make room for a transiting inbound scheduled flight, then and only then can diversions be accepted. The old days of parking a 747 full of passengers on the taxiway for half a day have gone. Take a look at the apron next time, you will see very few if any free stands, remote or otherwise. Its all very well saying the airport should do this, that and the other, but until there is a very positive indication that this nasty business is over, then investment in staff, trading and other resources is not going to happen.
HOVIS is offline  
Old 1st Jan 2022, 22:40
  #958 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: London
Posts: 355
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by HOVIS View Post
The airport IS full. There are still lots of parked aircraft around. It does not matter if Jet2 self handle or not, they don't have their own stands, they are a shared resource. When we stop towing the early arrivals off stand only to tow them back again 3 hrs later, just to make room for a transiting inbound scheduled flight, then and only then can diversions be accepted. The old days of parking a 747 full of passengers on the taxiway for half a day have gone. Take a look at the apron next time, you will see very few if any free stands, remote or otherwise. Its all very well saying the airport should do this, that and the other, but until there is a very positive indication that this nasty business is over, then investment in staff, trading and other resources is not going to happen.
An excellent point and the issue of stand capacity is a very real. I experience this first hand on a regular basis
cumbrianboy is offline  
Old 2nd Jan 2022, 02:05
  #959 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: SYD
Posts: 378
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I see the apron regularly and the airport is NOT permanently full for days on end. Yes, there are plenty of parked-up aircraft, but that is not the same thing as 'full'. If the airport were actually "full" as you say, it would be necessary to hold each inbound flight until a departing aircraft vacates a stand for it, wouldn't it? That is clearly not required, as the airport is not "full". Some (vacant) stands may indeed be set aside for an incoming flight, but not all of them. And not all day - a 'splash-and-dash' could certainly be accommodated in the middle of the day. Most diverted flights don't require contact stands anyway. And that is why a dynamic diversion policy should apply. The alternative reflects the lamentable "do not disturb" mentality which Manchester Airport highlighted to great effect when challenging the Department of Transport all those years ago.

Not every diversion can be accepted. We all recognise that. But some certainly can. I strongly suspect that those aforementioned Jet2's could have been accommodated. And what about smaller aircraft such as Citations and Learjets? A catch-all blanket no-divs notam prevents them from enquiring about access by default also.

A dynamic diversion policy allows for aircraft which genuinely cannot be accommodated to be turned away. But those which can be accommodated can be accepted. That is a good thing, though the "not my problem" brigade clearly need some convincing. Almost all other major airports operate a dynamic diversions policy without issue. But perhaps this is another example of the "Manchester way" alone being right beyond question, and every other major airport being incompetent without realising it.

the issue of stand capacity is a very real. I experience this first hand on a regular basis …
Yes, on a regular basis. That means not permanently. Which is why a dynamic policy should apply. Scope to use discretion is a good thing in a successful business.
OzzyOzBorn is offline  
Old 2nd Jan 2022, 08:38
  #960 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Eas Anglia
Age: 63
Posts: 670
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
From the Manchester Airport World Cargo Page.

"Manchester Airport's cargo facility, the World Freight Terminal, is a community of more than 1,000 professionals managing freight-only aircraft as well as consignments that arrive or depart in the holds of passenger aircraft. Having grown to meet the increasing demands on importers and exporters across the country, our 24/7 service operates from 60,000 square metres of warehouse and office space for a comprehensive air cargo support system."

One might summise that despite not having 1000 professionals onsite, not always a 24/7 operation , nor warehousing which has carpet bombed the surrounding area, Liverpool and indeed Bournemouth are able to compete really well ?

How is this possible ?

What was a sprinkling of freight flights into Liverpool has now morphed into a half a dozen flights a week until April, today there are actually two flights, so why is it that what's seen as an inconvenience at one airport with (in its own words) a wealth of infastructure is seen as a revenue and employment opportunity elsewhere ?

If you were CEO at Manchester would you not be contrasting and comparing the resources at hand ?

And what of Bournemouth, as an example , it had a meagre throughput of cargo a few years back but accordinging to this weeks Bournmouth Echo is on target this year to handle 20,000 tonnes,

From a standing start with no operators , no routes and very little infastructure the CEO is bullish reporting a forecast cargo throughput for 2022 of 40,000 tonnes.

In context that is a staggering 40% of the Manchester total pre pandemic and nearer 75% of the Manchester figures post pandemic.

Many detractors have suggested that one adhoc off cargo flights are nothing more than a hindrance , a nuisance but that completely misses the fact they can clearly turn into something more substantive.

One wonders what the CEOs of Liverpool and Bournemouth could do with 10% of the resources available at Manchester?
Navpi is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.