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BA pilots vote to strike

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BA pilots vote to strike

Old 22nd Sep 2019, 02:06
  #381 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
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I'm just impressed that this dude retired with 17,000 hours. You could join BA as a cadet at age 44 and knock that out...

B
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Old 22nd Sep 2019, 03:58
  #382 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Buter View Post
I'm just impressed that this dude retired with 17,000 hours. You could join BA as a cadet at age 44 and knock that out...

B
Yeah I was thinking the same. 17k hours isnít much for whole career. Part time worker well done. Minimum work for maximum pay. Gold star.
Also says he did Mid East VIP work moaning about BA salary demands. How much was that contract? obviously paid tax all his life.........

Here is some research for you from the FT.

A starting basic salary for a BA captain is about £75,000, according to Balpa, the pilotsí union. BA said the average salary for a captain was £167,000, with £16,000 of flight allowances on top of this. The airline has claimed the pay rise it has offered would take average captain salaries to more than £200,000.

In comparison, the starting salary for captains at German rival Lufthansa is Ä144,000, which rises to Ä170,000 with additional flight hours and profit sharing. Top-level captains earn a fixed salary of about Ä240,000, rising to Ä285,000 with the additional pay benefits. At Air France, the average salary for long-haul captains is Ä230,000, which does not include benefits, bonuses or profit shares.

BA pilots deserve a pay rise.

Last edited by AIMINGHIGH123; 22nd Sep 2019 at 04:30.
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Old 22nd Sep 2019, 08:59
  #383 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Runcorn,Cheshire,England
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Originally Posted by 2 Whites 2 Reds View Post
Yes.

Generally no but it has been known.

They're too high up and the cargo chaps would be rather annoyed.

wouldn't even know how to and again....it's too high up

thank god it's too high up. Why on earth would you be involved in dropping the toilets and playing with a biohazard before stepping back into the Flightdeck?

yep, when I was cabin crew myself many moons ago!

as above

yep, when I worked on the ramp at a regional airport for 8 months while scraping enough money together to do my IR.

Calling a taxi is extremely hard work....you're my hero. And it goes without saying you make sure you call yourself and don't ask reception or the concierge to call one for you just so you sleep well knowing you've done a good days work.

Simply flying the aircraft....theres nothing simple about getting an aeroplane from A-B and delivering hundreds of passengers and tonnes of cargo safely and efficiently to their destination. Now, either you're a troll and know absolutely nothing of flying OR you've got a rather large chip on both shoulders for reasons only you really understand.

Just be careful throwing stones around pal. Many of us have gone down a very long and difficult road to reach a seat at the pointy end of a BA aeroplane with lots of experience gained in various areas of the industry enroute. If you really think someone working for 'One-Man-Band Airways' frantically printing off paperwork and ordering a taxi while donning their biohazard suit to empty the poo tank is what a modern pilot should be then I'd suggest you don't know what you're on about and should possibly get your head read.

In any case, if you think your laughable example of 'One-Man-Band Airways' entitles you to sit back and slag off a group of rightly disgruntled professional pilots then your much mistaken.

Don't feed the Daily Mail journo Troll folks. No current or former professional pilot would come out with such utter tosh.
Carlsberg donít do forum posts, but if they did....
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Old 22nd Sep 2019, 09:13
  #384 (permalink)  
 
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Not that I agree with either side, it is quite funny to see how easy it is to wind up pilots. This website is a troll's paradise.

Unless it's your management calling you (or implying that you are such) 'overpaid bus drivers', why do you care? Stop nibbling. Stop willy-waving.
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Old 22nd Sep 2019, 09:15
  #385 (permalink)  
 
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Well said folks..I wonder if our friend is thinking of the lifetsyle and career path supposedly enjoyed by the Hamsters and doesn't realise that that gig has gone.

Most pilots at BA have done their fair share of cabin cleaning and the other "one man band" stuff in the civvie world and/or have "endured" the special brand of being overworked and multi tasked that goes with being in the military.

And as my esteemed colleague Buter and others point out out - 17K hours is a tidy amount but it isn't that impressive - A full timer in BA will be there and beyond in 20'ish working years...
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Old 22nd Sep 2019, 09:16
  #386 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
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Originally Posted by Archive mole;10575365[left
BA are not too big to fail. Remember the Australian strikes? Probably before many of you were born.

Originally Posted by Archive mole;10575365[left
I doubt you understand the underlying issues of the Australian strikes.

I do, I was there and discussed the issues with senior Australian Airlines management.

What those pilots were demanding was utterly absurd and not even their Qantas colleagues supported them.

What the BA pilots are asking for is just the opportunity to share in the success of a very profitable company, to which they have greatly contributed, a totally different scenario.
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Old 22nd Sep 2019, 09:26
  #387 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Archive mole View Post
Yea, yea. I’ve very happy in retirement with my very nice pension pot thank you. No one has yet said why BA pilots think they are so special that they need to demand the company fall to its knees and grant them their greedy wishes.

I am very pleased to see that management are going to take away strikes non contractual perks; that must eat many of you up and make travel to work more difficult and expensive.

BA are not too big to fail. Remember the Australian strikes? Probably before many of you were born.

Enjoy tearing apart the company you you work for; team players my a**.
they werent "strikes" in Australia, it was a dispute where the union leadership took resignations of all or the majority of the pilots to threaten management with, then submitted them, so basically the pilots RESIGNED en masse to avoid being sued by the Govt. (their employer)
...you archive mole, besides being a troll, are the steamy smelly reason some operators are able to keep certain levels of the industry in the sewer, where you reside....
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Old 22nd Sep 2019, 09:37
  #388 (permalink)  
RHS
 
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Suddenly realising why all those private heavy jobs are so well paid in the ME!

You have to clean the toilets, replace the water, load the baggage, fly the aircraft, print the paperwork, load the fuel! All on a 767! For only a half a million pound a year!!!
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Old 22nd Sep 2019, 09:39
  #389 (permalink)  
 
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Quite often it is the requisite schooling the beats them. Sometimes the eyesight (as claimed by Alan Joyce Qantas CEO) but almost always it is aptitude and attitude..
The result, as is the case with Alan Joyce is simple green envy.

The former Prime Minister that oversaw the dispute in Australia, claimed that pilots were "overpaid bus drivers"
What many do not know is that the former PM tried his hand at learning to flying. The student had many issues taking a multitude of dual instruction hours. Substantially well above the normal hours required, nearly double!
The Chipmunk a race car.
He quit quietly.
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Old 22nd Sep 2019, 16:57
  #390 (permalink)  
 
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Iím well over 17K hours and still have 18 years to go
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Old 22nd Sep 2019, 17:30
  #391 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2002
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I'm on 26.000 hours age 56 (BA 31 years)
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Old 22nd Sep 2019, 18:56
  #392 (permalink)  
 
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How many of those 26,000 hours were in the bunk asleep?
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Old 22nd Sep 2019, 19:18
  #393 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
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BA Pilots are special!

A few short observations before I head off to work.
BA pilots are special because they helped save the company when asked.
They have a rather good safety record as does Lufthansa , SAS and KLM.
So that alone they should be rewarded for, in my not so humble opinion.

Also , I understand this is the first strike ever from them, so thy must be rather fed up with today's state of affairs .

I have read Flight international since I was 16 , so soon 40 years and BA was often portrayed as the Best.
I still think they are among the best , but to recruit the potential best You need to serve more then peanuts once a month.
BA pilots are doing a dysfunctional greedy management a favor by strengthening the T/C.
I wish all BA pilots the best in the ongoing struggle

Regards
Cpt B
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Old 22nd Sep 2019, 19:20
  #394 (permalink)  
 
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A lot of bitter people in this thread trying hard to belittle ba pilots, one must assume personal issues and maybe even a chip on the old shoulder perhaps due to personal ambitions not being met, sing all you want about great times you had in your careers, but maybe it’s time to move on and let go
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Old 22nd Sep 2019, 19:34
  #395 (permalink)  
 
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You are never paid what you deserve......you are paid what you negotiate. Nothing further to argue about.
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Old 22nd Sep 2019, 20:20
  #396 (permalink)  
 
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Can we please get away from debates about flying hours which as everyone should know mean very little in the overall scheme of things. A BA pal of mine tells me he logs hours when he is asleep in the crew rest area for heavens sake !

Pilots at BA do live in a cosseted world but that is not a problem of their own making, it is how that airline and many other flag carriers operate. I flew with many pilots on the 75/76 who would not lift a finger to help out pax,engineers or cabin crew or simply go the extra mile to get the job done and whilst I flew with a significant airline, it certainly was not BA.

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Old 22nd Sep 2019, 21:35
  #397 (permalink)  
 
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Of course he logs hours when heís in the bunk!!! He is at work, onboard the aircraft, on duty and part of the required crew!!! Seriously......

CP
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Old 23rd Sep 2019, 08:32
  #398 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by beamer View Post
Can we please get away from debates about flying hours which as everyone should know mean very little in the overall scheme of things. A BA pal of mine tells me he logs hours when he is asleep in the crew rest area for heavens sake !

Pilots at BA do live in a cosseted world but that is not a problem of their own making, it is how that airline and many other flag carriers operate. I flew with many pilots on the 75/76 who would not lift a finger to help out pax,engineers or cabin crew or simply go the extra mile to get the job done and whilst I flew with a significant airline, it certainly was not BA.

did you discount any time you got up for a wee, or went for a physiological break in the cabin during the cruise? Bunk time is a requirement for extended FDP by way of augmenting the crew. Letís be under no illusions here, the bunks are uncomfortable, often filthy and you get woken up by all the usual noises the aeroplane makes. Youíre lucky if you get an hour or two at most. Some seem to think itís like a full night kip in your own bed.
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Old 23rd Sep 2019, 09:03
  #399 (permalink)  
 
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As I said earlier, total flying hours per se mean little after passing a certain threshold. There often appears to be a certain amount of willy waving with regard to logged flying hours hence a degree of scepticism on my part on the nature of the time being logged.

Being out of the loop for a wee while and regulations do change, may I respectfully ask whether all members of an augmented crew log the whole flying duty period or is it just the aircraft commander.

In the past I have been part of heavy crews who 'rest area' comprised at worst the jump seat and at best a seat in the cabin. The crew rest areas that I have seen, I would agree are not pleasant, though I would be interested to know if some are better than others depending on operator or perhaps newer types of aircraft.
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Old 23rd Sep 2019, 09:11
  #400 (permalink)  
 
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Logging hours in the bunk has nothing to do with Total Time qualification. Absolutely none.

It does have lots to do with counting towards 900 total annual and 100 monthly limits. Companies across the industry are already pushing hard to achieve as close to this as possible, any move towards discounting bunk time will utterly destroy quality of life and more importantly safety. You will in effect be adding another 20-30% total flying. You would be talking about moving towards an equivalent 1200-1300 total time a year.

whilst this may give HR and Finance departments a boner, it would be completely and utterly unsafe. Most canít sleep during their bunk stops and the junior guys usually get the early shift meaning they get no additional rest other than that being away from the flight deck.

Not sure as a 75/76 driver you would realise any of this doing mainly short/medium hail. Longer/ultra longhaul is a different ball game

Last edited by VinRouge; 23rd Sep 2019 at 09:25.
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