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UK EASA Licence Transfer

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UK EASA Licence Transfer

Old 24th Sep 2018, 18:51
  #41 (permalink)  
 
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http://www.gov.uk/government/publica...no-brexit-deal

so much for cosmetic changes, Mr Swan!
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Old 24th Sep 2018, 20:27
  #42 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by BONES_ View Post
http://www.gov.uk/government/publica...no-brexit-deal

so much for cosmetic changes, Mr Swan!
Looks like the CAA is going to be busy for the next two and a half years.
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Old 25th Sep 2018, 07:09
  #43 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by TURIN View Post
Looks like the CAA is going to be busy for the next two and a half years.
Two and a half year sounds a little bit optimistic. I‘d double that.
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Old 25th Sep 2018, 13:30
  #44 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by BONES_ View Post
http://www.gov.uk/government/publica...no-brexit-deal

so much for cosmetic changes, Mr Swan!
Mr Swan's "cosmetic changes" clearly referred to the removal of references to EASA (not the effect of the UK leaving EASA) on the physical licenses as they were re-issued at point of change or renewal:

The CAA will continue to issue and reissue pilots' licences ... this would include removing references to EASA - a purely cosmetic change
Important to also note the context - ie. part of a statement made to address news articles which suggested that all CAA-issued licences would need immediate re-issue.

None of this is at odds with or contradicts the brexit no-deal documents. Whether it contradicts the EASA notice to stakeholders or not depends on interpretation of that notice (EASA may view the references on the physical certificate/licence as non-cosmetic, and invalidating, if the UK leaves EASA - compare CAA & EASA statements on aerodrome certificates). The CAA statements and documents, however, look to me to be entirely self consistent.
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Old 26th Sep 2018, 05:40
  #45 (permalink)  
 
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So if Brexit does occur and there is no agreement between UK CAA and EASA. Would that mean the UK CAA will commence reissuing The UK ATPL??
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Old 26th Sep 2018, 05:52
  #46 (permalink)  
 
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This may be a stupid question, but (other than bloody-mindedness) why cannot the UK continue to be part of EASA - there are already non-EU (albeit EFTA) member countries?
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Old 26th Sep 2018, 08:08
  #47 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Cyberhacker View Post
This may be a stupid question, but (other than bloody-mindedness) why cannot the UK continue to be part of EASA - there are already non-EU (albeit EFTA) member countries?
Because UK wants to get rid of European Court of Justice jurisdiction, and then it would be impossible to be a part of EASA.
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Old 26th Sep 2018, 08:39
  #48 (permalink)  
 
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Because EASA have been instructed by the EC not to assist the UK by accepting its application to join as a non-EU State until the UK actually is a non-EU State.
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Old 26th Sep 2018, 09:05
  #49 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by liider View Post
Because UK wants to get rid of European Court of Justice jurisdiction, and then it would be impossible to be a part of EASA.
Not true - other non-EU states are already in EASA without direct ECJ jurisdiction, and the UK has already said it is OK with indirect ECJ jurisdiction in cases like EASA.

Yes it is arguably a fudge of the UK "red line", but in reality almost every similar international agreement has some form of supranational tribunal of some sort.
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Old 26th Sep 2018, 09:57
  #50 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by infrequentflyer789 View Post
Not true - other non-EU states are already in EASA without direct ECJ jurisdiction, and the UK has already said it is OK with indirect ECJ jurisdiction in cases like EASA.
If the UK bites the bullet with the NI border issue, I think there will be no problem with them staying on EASA.
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Old 26th Sep 2018, 11:02
  #51 (permalink)  
 
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Just reading about the UK wanting to finally close the borders to EU citizens in 3 years time..brace for impact Ahahhah
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Old 26th Sep 2018, 12:33
  #52 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by infrequentflyer789 View Post
Not true - other non-EU states are already in EASA without direct ECJ jurisdiction, and the UK has already said it is OK with indirect ECJ jurisdiction in cases like EASA.

Yes it is arguably a fudge of the UK "red line", but in reality almost every similar international agreement has some form of supranational tribunal of some sort.
There is no such thing as "indirect jurisdiction", this is just what UK government is trying to invent. You either stay, follow and abide or lose all privileges and play on your own.
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Old 26th Sep 2018, 14:06
  #53 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by liider View Post
There is no such thing as "indirect jurisdiction", this is just what UK government is trying to invent. You either stay, follow and abide or lose all privileges and play on your own.
From https://news.sky.com/story/govt-to-s...-line-11151049

Norway and Switzerland have joint committees to allow that jurisdiction to operate indirectly, but it still exists.
UK government is not trying to invent anything, just looking for the sort of EASA membership deal that has already been given to others.

Note that the Swiss have similar opinions to UK wrt. ECJ, and the current EU-Swiss treaty negotiations have reached impasse on precisely the issue of the Swiss accepting direct ECJ jurisdiction (spoiler: they won't).
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Old 26th Sep 2018, 17:08
  #54 (permalink)  
 
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Even many lawyers have an opinion that "direct" and so-called "indirect" jurisdiction is technically the same. In case of Brexit, it's just an attempt to somehow show (or cheat?) to Brits that UK could have an option to choose, if they want ECJ to make decisions in one specific area, but not in some other.

But it's just an illusion, you should know that it's impasse from the EU side.
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Old 26th Sep 2018, 17:52
  #55 (permalink)  
 
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Find update on the subject : :info.caa.co.uk/eu-exit/commercial-pilots/
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Old 19th Oct 2018, 10:28
  #56 (permalink)  
 
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I'm currently doing ATPL Theory with the UK CAA, do you think that the theory credits will still be valid after 28th March (assuming we exit EASA) towards a UK CAA CPL/IR?
Considering changing SOLI over to IAA and potentially registering to do the EASA exams with AustroControl (Bristol Ground School have set up an AustroControl exam centre at their HQ)
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Old 16th Nov 2018, 11:23
  #57 (permalink)  
 
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Anyone noticed the UK CAA issued a new ''official'' form called SRG 2150 since October 18? Regarding license transfer from UK to another EASA member state. I am in the process of changing my license to another EU country. Seems this form is there to make it more difficult and longer to get your application through. Since it now says on the CAA website you need to provide this form, before they can issue a DOC 155. Due to GDPR.... yeah right...
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Old 31st Jan 2019, 15:56
  #58 (permalink)  
 
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Looking at the Irish CAA fees schedule, and considering the following:

* Transfer of my UK CPL to IAA costs €450 according to the IAA fees schedule.

* I have recently renewed my SEP and IR. I have sent the paperwork to the UK CAA but a new UK licence may or may not be issued before the IAA get around to processing my paperwork. If it does go through in time, I'll have to pay €300.- or €600.- when I renew my MEP.

* If it doesn't go through in time, somehow I'll have to apply for renewal of my ratings separately, at €300.- each.

In summary, am I really looking at a bill of €750 to €1350 from the IAA for the "privilege" of transferring my licence?
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 08:53
  #59 (permalink)  
 
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That’s cheap compared to other EASA states like Austria...
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Old 6th Feb 2019, 16:07
  #60 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by McMax View Post
That’s cheap compared to other EASA states like Austria...
As far as I can ascertain, Austria is marginally cheaper. See the attached fee schedule.

Available from http://www.austrocontrol.at/en/pilot...nses/licensing
Attached Files
File Type: pdf
DC_LFA_PEL_105.pdf (263.9 KB, 9 views)
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