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EasyJet to transfer 1400 pilots licence from UK to Austria as a precaution to brexit

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EasyJet to transfer 1400 pilots licence from UK to Austria as a precaution to brexit

Old 14th Sep 2018, 19:33
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EasyJet to transfer 1400 pilots licence from UK to Austria as a precaution to brexit

easyJet (U2, London Luton) has said it would assist its 1,400 pilots to relocate their licences from the United Kingdom jurisdiction to Austria as a part of preparations for the worst-case scenario no-deal Brexit, Air Transport World has reported.

"Depending on the outcome of the Brexit negotiations, UK-issued pilot licenses, after the UK leaves the European Union (EU), could be no longer valid within the EU. Thatís why we have worked with the UKís Civil Aviation Authorityís and Austro Control to come up with a solution," the airline spokesperson said.
https://www.ch-aviation.com/portal/n...-uk-to-austria
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Old 14th Sep 2018, 21:46
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So the chaos has started.
A prominent UK AME told me with regards to UK medicals that there would be EU approval for some of them, if it looks like a Crash Out!
If I understand him right!
For anyone with a UK medical and EU licence I would strongly recommend dobbelchecking ASAP.

This could get crowded and ugly for some.
Lets hope not!

regards
Cpt B
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Old 15th Sep 2018, 11:41
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Would their Austrian licences be valid in the UK?
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Old 15th Sep 2018, 12:29
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Originally Posted by SWBKCB View Post
Would their Austrian licences be valid in the UK?
In a no deal scenario most likely not. If you mean that someone with an EU license could fly a G-registered plane. However, of course it would be possible to continue to fly on planes registered in the EASA states. It just would be the same as flying to any other third country out of the EU, depending on individual traffic rights of course, but that is more an operators problem than a crew one.
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Old 15th Sep 2018, 14:45
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Those pilots can also get a UK national licence and transfer their main licence to another EASA member state keeping both privileges I believe
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Old 15th Sep 2018, 14:59
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Originally Posted by Negan View Post
Those pilots can also get a UK national licence and transfer their main licence to another EASA member state keeping both privileges I believe
Well, no.

At the moment the UK is still in EASA and a pilot can hold only one EASA license. UK national licenses (at least for those regulated by EASA) can not exist until the UK leaves the EASA/EU. Once left, the pilots are ICAO licensed in a third country and would have to do the same stuff every third country pilot has to do, which is write the 14 exams and prove their practical experience. Which could include simulator checks for each type they want to have on that license. As usual, that is for a no deal scenario.
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Old 15th Sep 2018, 15:01
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Originally Posted by Denti View Post
Well, no.

At the moment the UK is still in EASA and a pilot can hold only one EASA license. UK national licenses (at least for those regulated by EASA) can not exist until the UK leaves the EASA/EU. Once left, the pilots are ICAO licensed in a third country and would have to do the same stuff every third country pilot has to do, which is write the 14 exams and prove their practical experience. Which could include simulator checks for each type they want to have on that license. As usual, that is for a no deal scenario.
In reality, we all know that's not going to happen. There is no prospect that flights between the UK and other countries will cease on March 30 2019.
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Old 15th Sep 2018, 15:11
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This is getting stupid. I hold an Australian ATPL and a JAA ATPL and a UAE ATPL.

I could ( now retired thank God)..happily fly to any EU country I wanted to. What will stop a pilot with a UK licence fling into Europe?? it was done without too much trouble before there was an EU. ( And I lived in Europe for 17 years so I have an interest)
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Old 15th Sep 2018, 15:22
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We had 70 years of CAA/ARB experience and an organisational structure to handle self regulation. We don't have that capability at the moment as it is all done by EASA. Whether or not the UK CAA can entice experienced people to leave EASA and help run the CAA again remains to be seen, but if they don't start manning up soon it will be a problem. Not just for pilots, Engineers and ATCOs will be in the same boat. As will everything else the CAA used to do.
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Old 15th Sep 2018, 17:01
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Originally Posted by msjh View Post
In reality, we all know that's not going to happen. There is no prospect that flights between the UK and other countries will cease on March 30 2019.
Well, that is what most hope. But you cannot plan on hope, which is why easyJet apparently works on splitting the big half of its operation in another two parts, making the company basically three separate entities. The already existing part is of course easyJet Switzerland which is already separated from the rest although switzerland is actually an EASA member, but not inside the EU.
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Old 15th Sep 2018, 17:34
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Originally Posted by msjh View Post
In reality, we all know that's not going to happen. There is no prospect that flights between the UK and other countries will cease on March 30 2019.
Bury your head in the sand and hope for the best
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Old 15th Sep 2018, 21:00
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Originally Posted by msjh View Post
In reality, we all know that's not going to happen. There is no prospect that flights between the UK and other countries will cease on March 30 2019.
You are very welcome to risk it, as nothing is going to happen.
Personally, in the same fashion as when I am in the aircraft, I would opt for a different tactic!
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Old 15th Sep 2018, 22:11
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Does anyone know what Ryanair's plans are vis-ŗ-vis pilot licencing? They're the worlds fifth largest airline with a quarter of their fleet based in the UK and have applied for a UK AOC so I'd like to know.
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Old 15th Sep 2018, 23:51
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Well.

As far as MOL is concerned. (An EU airline with a HUGE interest in this!) He believes airlines may be grounded for a day.

Or two?

Ainít catastrophe is it?
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Old 15th Sep 2018, 23:55
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[QUOTE=Tandemrotor;10250146]
Well.

As far as MOL is concerned. (An EU airline with a HUGE interest in this!) He believes airlines may perhaps be grounded for a day?

Or maybe two?

Ainít catastrophe is it?

So in 6 months tiime. Letís see whether anyone here is commenting hysterically!?

i suspect they are!
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Old 16th Sep 2018, 06:09
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Just to be clear, itís not about being able to fly between EASA countries and UK post brexit. The question is wether or not you can fly G registered and / or EASA registered aircraft on your EASA / UK license. As far as the right to operate between EU countries and U.K. post brexit goes, this has nothing to do with pilotís licenses.

CP
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Old 16th Sep 2018, 07:46
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Originally Posted by Count of Monte Bisto View Post
This is all posturing like the Ďdreadedí millennium bug that did absolutely nothing. It is stupid rumour-mongering by buffoons and ill-intended numpties at the EU. Absolutely pathetic and a non-event, unless you are an EU bureaucrat who wants to make problems rather than find solutions. One of the many reasons just to get out and leave them to it.
Unlike the millennium bug this is something that WILL happen as long as the U.K. maintains its red line of not accepting the ECJ authority, in this case as the body tasked with deciding how EASA rules need to be interpreted.

You want out, this is a logical consequence. If the U.K. maintains its stubborn attitude you have only yourselves to blame. Bed, lie, in it.
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Old 16th Sep 2018, 07:46
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Yes, and just to be even clearer, itís not about politics, rights agreements etc..it is about the (remote to be honest) possibility that your hard earned ATPL valid in the whole of Europe, could now be valid in ONE country only. You cannot apply for any jobs that flies non G- aircraft. You would be exactly the same as a pilot with a namibian or guatemalan licence.
To even considering risking something like this requires serious patriotism!
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Old 16th Sep 2018, 08:10
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Why would UK not be a member of EASA after Brexit? For example, Iceland and Norway are, and they are not members of EU. And almost forgot, Switzerland, too.
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Old 16th Sep 2018, 08:17
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Originally Posted by Bowmore View Post
Why would UK not be a member of EASA after Brexit? For example, Iceland and Norway are, and they are not members of EU. And almost forgot, Switzerland, too.
Itís like talking to a wall.
Keep the uk licence and medical then! Be my guest
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