Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Flight Deck Forums > Rumours & News
Reload this Page >

British Airways flight diverted to YVR after passengers suffer smoke inhalation

Rumours & News Reporting Points that may affect our jobs or lives as professional pilots. Also, items that may be of interest to professional pilots.

British Airways flight diverted to YVR after passengers suffer smoke inhalation

Old 1st Jan 2017, 16:44
  #161 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Europe
Posts: 26
From memory, there are only so many substances that can cause that level of incapacitation
Carbon monoxide and/or hypoxia for example can cause confusion and other described symptoms:
https://www.cigna.com/healthwellness...lertness-confu
https://cfpub2.epa.gov/ncea/risk/rec...TOKEN=19447862

The health effects associated with exposure to CO range from the more subtle cardiovascular and neuro-behavioral effects at low concentrations

After landing some passengers spoke about CO:
“It was pretty scary,” he said, adding they were told there were some technical problems with the plane. “The cabin crew on the top deck weren’t feeling very good because it was something to do with some carbon monoxide or something, that’s what [the firefighters] were talking about,” he said.
British Airways flight forced to land in Vancouver after crew members fall ill | Globalnews.ca
MrsDoubtfire is offline  
Old 1st Jan 2017, 17:03
  #162 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: London, New York, Paris, Moscow.
Posts: 3,632
Hmm CO build-up next to outlets? doubt it, I was thinking more of an introduced agent.
glad rag is offline  
Old 1st Jan 2017, 21:39
  #163 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 1,449
Originally Posted by silverstrata View Post
The Times link is paywalled. This is the article, in the Daily Mail.
It's not paywalled - like I said, you just have to register.

Flight crew ?spaced out? on fumes | News | The Times & The Sunday Times
Background Noise is offline  
Old 2nd Jan 2017, 10:51
  #164 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Florida and wherever my laptop is
Posts: 1,346
Originally Posted by MrsDoubtfire View Post
Carbon monoxide and/or hypoxia for example can cause confusion and other described symptoms:
https://www.cigna.com/healthwellness...lertness-confu
https://cfpub2.epa.gov/ncea/risk/rec...TOKEN=19447862

The health effects associated with exposure to CO range from the more subtle cardiovascular and neuro-behavioral effects at low concentrations

After landing some passengers spoke about CO:
“It was pretty scary,” he said, adding they were told there were some technical problems with the plane. “The cabin crew on the top deck weren’t feeling very good because it was something to do with some carbon monoxide or something, that’s what [the firefighters] were talking about,” he said.
British Airways flight forced to land in Vancouver after crew members fall ill | Globalnews.ca
The cabin crew all happily deplaned and walked into the hospital so it is unlikely that Carbon Monoxide was to blame as recovery from that takes some time as the haemoglobin has been bound with the carbon monoxide into carboxyheamoglobin which will take nearly an hour of 100% oxygen or ~6 hours with normal air to recover from.

Even Carbon Dioxide at high concentrations can give similar symptoms to those noted at high concentrations known as hypercapnia - perhaps a leaking CO2 bottle?

Symptoms and signs of early hypercapnia include flushed skin, full pulse, tachypnea, dyspnea, extrasystoles, muscle twitches, hand flaps, reduced neural activity, and possibly a raised blood pressure. According to other sources, symptoms of mild hypercapnia might include headache, confusion and lethargy. Hypercapnia can induce increased cardiac output, an elevation in arterial blood pressure, and a propensity toward arrhythmias.[4][5] In severe hypercapnia (generally PaCO2 greater than 10 kPa or 75 mmHg), symptomatology progresses to disorientation, panic, hyperventilation, convulsions, unconsciousness, and eventually death.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypercapnia
Ian W is offline  
Old 2nd Jan 2017, 14:42
  #165 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: North by Northwest
Posts: 429
The curious symptoms to me are "stuffing food into their mouths" and a metallic taste. The first almost sounds hallucinogenic - the second can be caused by lots of things. In the early 60's our high school metal shop had a closed and well ventilated area for spraying zinc chromate primer on our projects and we were told never to heat painted surfaces (typically zinc chromate). Acute metal fume fever perhaps? Can be caused by fumes from heated metal or metal dust (magnesium for example) or heated zinc chromate.

Wonder if any toxicology studies have been performed on Airbus new Scalmalloy that makes up the bionic partition between pax and galley as well as the jumpseat (at least on the 320)? Lots of new generation alloys being used in today's environment.
b1lanc is offline  
Old 2nd Jan 2017, 17:20
  #166 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: England,East Midlands
Age: 52
Posts: 6
Won't be Foundryman's ague , unless they were up to a bit of brass smelting in
a spare oven, vaporized zinc is the cause , and the symptoms are similar to a bad Flu, or Malaria.

I suppose a new alloy could emit fumes, but modern metallurgy is so precise I cannot imagine such a novel characteristic escaping notice.
RR22 is offline  
Old 2nd Jan 2017, 17:20
  #167 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: UK
Age: 75
Posts: 1,066
Simple case of mass hysteria.
Cabin crew talking to eachother about some imagined or minor symptoms, most probably one of them had eaten something wrong before the flight.
Not talking about it to the passengers so only the cabin crew affected.
The Ancient Geek is offline  
Old 2nd Jan 2017, 20:27
  #168 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Hornby Island, British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 102
I agree with the mass hysteria suspicion The fact that no passengers were involved when there were 400 of them on board the 380 and yet none reported any symptoms is simply not a sustainable alibi for the cabin crew's explanation of an on-board toxic fume event.

Along with the prior food ingestion explanation for the origin of the hysteria, there may also have been the possibility that some pollutant in the air in the crew bus that took the crew to San Francisco airport from their hotel may have been a cause of some of the cabin crew's subsequent symptoms. Or maybe something from the hotel itself affected them? The early days of the exploration of the causes of Legionnaire's Disease have a similar Sherlock Holmes-type series of conjectures as to the origins of the ailment.
McGinty is offline  
Old 2nd Jan 2017, 20:38
  #169 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: North by Northwest
Posts: 429
3 crew and 1 pax - Canadian TSB

Although 25 crew and 1 pax were taken to hospitals for observation, TSB reports 3 crew and the one pax were "affected by the fumes". Hardly mass hysteria and doesn't seem to track with latest release of info which implied zombie crew, crew lying on the deck, etc.
b1lanc is offline  
Old 6th Jan 2017, 10:09
  #170 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Manchester, UK
Posts: 1,904
Without prejudging the cause, one possible source of contamination is organophosphates from engine oil; wanting out of that environment is hardly "hysteria"
ShotOne is offline  
Old 7th Jan 2017, 19:15
  #171 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Stockholm Sweden
Age: 70
Posts: 572
The air circulation on the A380 goes from cabin, to cargo , then overboard. No chance of fumes from the cargo entering the cabin.
Its the same on most big jets. I had an incident on a B767. There was a smell incident in the rear galley. One of the four cabin crew working there was incapacitated by the smell, and was taken off the aircraft by the paramedics and stayed in hospital overnight. The other three crew in that galley were not really concerned. I went to investigate, and finally found that the toilet/galley vent exhaust fan in the back of the bulk cargo hold had burnt out and tripped its CB. So I removed the plug and the aircraft departed (there are two fans). The steward that went to hospital was really bad, and he smelt the fumes from this burnt out motor in the galley about 1.5 meters above the fan.
The other 3 crew standing beside him were OK.
We wonder at times what they are thinking.
Swedish Steve is offline  
Old 15th May 2018, 01:26
  #172 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: nowhere
Posts: 0
"In May 2018 The Aviation Herald received information that about 40-50 minutes into the flight an odour of glue type and burning plastics was detected near main deck door 4L. A family nearby had just oblate oil on their baby, however, the smell of the oblate oil was different to the odour detected near the door. A short time later the flight attendant in the upper deck galley began to vomit and reported there had been an odour of smelly feet during boarding and departure. Ovens and trash compactors were checked without success. During the following about 40 minutes other cabin crew members began to perform abnormally, complaints about headache, dizziness, lightheadedness, nausea, metallic taste in mouth surfaced, the cabin crew members showed itchy red eyes and became increasingly forgetful, aggressive and confused, e.g. replying completely out of context of an ongoing discussion then bluntly denying what just had been said. The worst affected flight attendant was put on oxygen. Medlink was contacted, at that point 12 cabin crew were cause of concern, the captain subsequently decided to divert. Cabin crew were slow in responding to the diversion and prepare the cabin due to inability to function normally and needed to be queried and guided by other crew. After the diversion was changed to Vancouver, which added another hour of flight time, 8 cabin crew were able to get on oxygen, a few other cabin crew went to go to the toilet but were subsequently found anywhere else in the aircraft but the lavatories. In the meantime the captain had donned his oxygen mask, while the two first officers continued without. Cabin crew became concerned they couldn't cover the doors for landing with that many cabin crew already affected and close to being incapacitated. After landing two firefighters with measurement devices and full protective gear boarded the aircraft, many passengers started to use their mobile phones to take photos and videos. Paramedics boarded and began to examine the cabin crew with the most affected being checked first, the paramedics became concerned with all cabin crew and wanted all of them checked. A number of passengers requested medical assistance, too. The worst affected flight attendant vomitted again and collapsed during disembarking. Cabin crew were taken to three different hospitals across the city but declared fit to fly home as passengers the following day."
JammedStab is offline  
Old 15th May 2018, 08:27
  #173 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: London
Posts: 7,085
I was once in a group in a lab that suffered from CO poisoning , v similar symptoms........
Heathrow Harry is offline  
Old 15th May 2018, 09:02
  #174 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: London
Posts: 36
Originally Posted by JammedStab View Post
.... and became increasingly forgetful, aggressive and confused, e.g. replying completely out of context of an ongoing discussion then bluntly denying what just had been said....
They should check BA's customer service centre for the same smoke.
Cynical Sid is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.