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Pilot's artificial arm 'became detached while landing plane'

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Pilot's artificial arm 'became detached while landing plane'

Old 14th Aug 2014, 17:21
  #61 (permalink)  
 
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I think I have been in the back of said pilots aircraft 2-3 times.


And I wouldn't hesitate to do it again
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Old 14th Aug 2014, 17:26
  #62 (permalink)  
 
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The problem is not with the pilot, he's fine. It's the mechanical arm created by the medical industry, likely assembled by an intern, with likely no thoughts to air worthiness or reliability. If they'd certify the arm components like the rest of the aircraft I'd fly with him all day everyday.
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Old 14th Aug 2014, 17:50
  #63 (permalink)  
 
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For all of you who feel this more than capable, obviously highly skilled, motivated individual should be assigned to an office, ground duties, simulator or some other role than flying because of using a prosthetic arm. Or those of you who feel less than capable of operating as a crew member or are uncomfortable with someone who has a prosthetic limb, wears glasses, or some other disability even being allowed into a cockpit having passed probably a more stringent CAA class 1 medical, been tested in a simulator to higher degree than themselves with a normal class 1 medical, or feel they know better than the medical advisors at the CAA, should sit down, take a deep breath then reflect on their comments posted here.

How many of you would even bother pursuing the CAA to retain a medical after loosing a limb to continue flying, never mind continuing with your airline job ? probably not many of you, most would take the easy route claiming their loss of licence insurance, early retirement pension and take the airline for everything they could get.

Give the guy a break, I for one would rather fly with him over most pontificating on this forum, the 100 hour button pushing wannabes or the infallible been there got the tee shirt ex military types.

The only reason this thread was started by the original OP was because the guy had the balls to put his head above the parapet and report what had happened, only to have it picked up and most likely blown out of all proportion by the gutter press, the passengers had no idea other than a bounce and a hard landing.

Well done for your perseverance and I hope the publicity does not affect your so far successful career.
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Old 14th Aug 2014, 19:13
  #64 (permalink)  
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If the CAA allows medical exceptions , they are just that : exceptions, and rare events , and given after serious considerations and very often after a long process.
The guys that get those exceptions are generally exceptional people , and this case proves it again , if I read the post of Airjersey earlier.
I hope he can continue his carreer and I will be proud to fly with him.
I did not know Flybe but, reading the comments they made after the event , sounds like a very good airline to fly with too.
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Old 14th Aug 2014, 19:16
  #65 (permalink)  
 
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flap, boac and others

yes

you move the throttles and a well trimmed airplane will maintain speed (climb), you call for max power and move your good hand to the control wheel.

now, granted, it takes longer to read than actually do.

try it in the sim some time, assuming you really know how to trim.

while some planes may have unique handling qualities , a straight wing turboprop would probably do just fine.

add power in a 737 and the nose will come up, underwing engines don't you know?

now, I'm not saying that once you call for max power, you don't move your hand to the yoke, but try it .
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Old 14th Aug 2014, 19:54
  #66 (permalink)  
 
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glendalegoon - I can only assume you've never flown the Q400, you're suggested course of action at that stage in the landing in those conditions would be moronic. Please never try it.

As for those commenting on the individual involved, I suggest you only do so with full knowledge of the facts. He's a good guy and a better pilot than I'll ever be. I will continue to operate with him without a seconds hesitation.
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Old 14th Aug 2014, 20:05
  #67 (permalink)  
 
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I wish this chap all the best. I too have heard from pilots on social media who have made statements in his defense after being bombarded with questions of 'have you flown with this guy?!' Nothing but fine things to say about a guy who has flown into Belfast on many occasions in horrendous condition without incident. Even this wasn't a terrible incident. I'm sure most of us have been in a squeaky bum situation where we thought....S*/T! But it was a non-event because we have 2 arms.

But what I'm curious about is how would you fly from the right seat if you've lost your left arm? There are 2 yokes so if there was a failure of the left limb as a Captain, the F/O could wrestle the aircraft out of trouble with his/her yoke and give you time to sort yourself out.

However if you're flying in the right seat and since there is one set of throttles...surely you can't clamp the arm to the throttles?! If there were to be some sort of failure of the limb and it is stuck to the ONLY set of throttles I would imagine you could be in some sort poo.

Pardon my ignorance. I am sure they have come up with a procedure and everything is safe. I just cannot see what it could be. Unless you can only fly from the left.....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=b2IqpPSF9-U

Last edited by Desert Budgie; 14th Aug 2014 at 20:18. Reason: Added Video Link
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Old 14th Aug 2014, 20:06
  #68 (permalink)  
 
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Political correctness gone absolutely mad and I thought the FLYBE Director of flight operations response could be a "Gerald Ratner" moment for the company.

So how many other disabled pilots does FLYBE employ .....and what is the nature of their disabilities? People are scared enough as it is already about flying without being unwitting bystanders to FLYBE's experimenation with their well being.

How about an explosive decompression, an emergency evacuation, fire and smoke on the flight deck? How would the guy cope?
Clearly not as well as an able bodied counterpart......

For goodness sake we only let able bodied pax occupy seats next to emergency exits!!!


Fair play to the guy concerned, hes only doing what hes been allowed to do ( and if Im correct he had to come all tne way from Oz to find someone to employ him?) but at the end of the day this was an entirely forseeable event and at the very least he should be restricted to flying with trainers who are used to recovering a situation from an inexperienced trainee.
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Old 14th Aug 2014, 20:17
  #69 (permalink)  
 
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Have you not heard of simulators, LPC, OPC. For those who don't know this is when the chap involved would have had to go through simulated emergencies ie. engine failure/fire, decompression, fire/smoke in the cabin, fuel leaks, incapacitation, double hydraulics failure.........need I go on.

He has been issued a Class 1 medical by the CAA not Flybe, they have just employed him because he is suitably qualified.
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Old 14th Aug 2014, 20:20
  #70 (permalink)  
 
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It's obviously a safe situation but surely the mechanics of the false arm (or false anything else) should be manufactured, certified and checked to aircraft standards if used to fly an aircraft.
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Old 14th Aug 2014, 20:26
  #71 (permalink)  
 
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WOT WORRIES ME.

A commonly quoted statistic for aviation accidents quotes 70% due to "pilot error".


In that case maybe the medical authorities should be looking ever so closely at that 50,000 year old microprocessor which occupies the space between the ears of us articulate Bonobo Chimps, who have occupied the driving seats of Public Transport aircraft.


Remember UK CAA mandated twice yearly ECGs on the over 40s for many years post Trident "PI" at LHR, til a few years ago when it reverted to the over 60s?


Doubtless the brave and honest Flybe Captain will arrange an improved prosthetic device and we can all go back to waiting for the next major hull loss under the control of 100% complete flight crew unable to fly a visual approach!


Lighten up folks, there are more important flight safety hazards out there, a lot of them flying desks at YOUR airlines HQ??!!
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Old 14th Aug 2014, 20:41
  #72 (permalink)  
 
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"Arm down and locked" added to before landing checklist?
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Old 14th Aug 2014, 20:48
  #73 (permalink)  
 
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grumpy

"Arm down and locked"
That is naughty but very funny
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Old 14th Aug 2014, 20:59
  #74 (permalink)  
 
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A professional pilot in the course of his employment encounters a situation that has a potential safety implication. To the Professional pilots I apologise. To the breathless and excitable, I make the following points. It happens to us all. It often happens multiple time in a year. A situation arises that either requires or invites us to make a safety report. We make those reports in the belief that they are going to be read and in some cases acted upon, to improve the overall safety standards of ourselves, our operations and our industry. Outside of the mandatory requirements we make those reports in good faith and in the implicit understanding that they will be constructively used to promote a positive safety culture for everybody concerned.

What we don't expect (and it is a worrying trend,) is that those reports will be hijacked by the entertainment media (and others) in order to ridicule, embarrass, or invite legions of uniformed opinion and crass comment. The danger being that such results only serve to stifle and restrict honest and open reporting.

These are professional pilots forums, and whilst I understand that contribution is not restricted to that demographic, it is still the target audience. I doubt that many of the "ha-ha" comments and "jokes" haven't been heard thousands of times before by individuals who have had to overcome exceptional challenges in their lives to reach the pinnacles of their own careers. It is embarrassing that so many people feel the need to contribute to this thread with little else, even though many have been removed.

This is a report by a professional pilot made as a matter of routine and in a situation where he made a decisive choice out of a number that were available to him. There was no adverse outcome. The report was no doubt intended to help prevent a recurrence of that particular situation. In essence it was little different to any number of similar reports any of us might make about a go-around, a heavy landing, a reduction of separation, or the myriad of other things that we collectively fill thousands and thousands of reports in for, every single year! The Daily Mail doesn't find an element of entertainment in most of those.

It would be sad if we thought twice about the best course of action, or making a report, simply because our decision might be torn apart on PPRuNe by gaggles of folk who really don't have a clue, or if they do, should perhaps, restrain themselves from using the point for a cheap gag!

Whilst it is understandable that the Daily Mail regards this snippet as "News" even though it didn't involve Princess Diana or Immigrants, it is harder to understand why Professional pilots would.
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Old 14th Aug 2014, 21:03
  #75 (permalink)  
 
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Best post on the thread.

Thank you Bealzebub.

Time to lock it mods.
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Old 14th Aug 2014, 21:05
  #76 (permalink)  
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Very well said Bealzebub. Could not agree more .
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Old 14th Aug 2014, 21:24
  #77 (permalink)  
 
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Agreed bealzebub. It is the sort of ignorant comments seen on this thread that do the most damage and stop an open and honest reporting culture that is essential in our industry.
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Old 14th Aug 2014, 21:25
  #78 (permalink)  
 
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pilots prosthetic arm

I'm sorry to say that I find many of the posts slightly distasteful. I am the first to concede that passenger safety is paramount and in no circumstances must it be ever compromised. The CAA approved and cerified this pilot fit to fly. Whatever happened is obviously unfortunate and should never have occured. It is to be thanked that an accident did not occur. That was mainly down to this pilots decisive skill and I think it wrong that he is the subject of mainly adverse and hysterical media coverage and comment elsewhere. Well done that man.
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Old 14th Aug 2014, 21:32
  #79 (permalink)  
 
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Of course all kinds of funny thoughts ran through my brain, dimwitted as I am.

Bet the Monty's could make one heck of a skit out of it, might even challenge the cockpit one:"I spy with my little eye.......!"

However, I'd fly with that gent every day of the week and twice on Sundays.

Last edited by Diesel8; 14th Aug 2014 at 21:44.
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Old 14th Aug 2014, 22:08
  #80 (permalink)  
 
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I haven' read this thread and usually post elsewhere but feel compelled to express support to the pilot, weld done. You deserve you're position, limbs don't cause accidents, actions do!
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