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JETPACK for GNAAS

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JETPACK for GNAAS

Old 29th Sep 2020, 12:17
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JETPACK for GNAAS

I thought it was April 1st for a moment...

Jet suit paramedic tested in the Lake District 'could save lives'

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Old 29th Sep 2020, 12:46
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“Job on!”...
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 13:36
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Rule 1: DON‘T lose references
Rule 2: BE on the ground before the power runs out.

Pretty cool bit of kit. Just needs a hoist.
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 13:38
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On BBC breakfast I think they mentioned a 9 minute flight time? They also mentioned using it on mountains such as Helvellyn.
I can't help wondering if the paramedic isn't going to be left up a mountain with however many lbs of rocket gear to lug down?
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 13:43
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Looks more like they are trying hard to find a "purpose" for their toy.....

Don´t get me wrong:
Its an impressive piece of engineering, and obviously a great toy.

But i don´t ever see a "medic" using this to get to a patient instead of using a car or a helicopter......or a fire fighter to use this getting on top of a burning building......
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 14:22
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Originally Posted by hueyracer View Post
Looks more like they are trying hard to find a "purpose" for their toy.....
Don´t get me wrong:
Its an impressive piece of engineering, and obviously a great toy.
But i don´t ever see a "medic" using this to get to a patient instead of using a car or a helicopter......or a fire fighter to use this getting on top of a burning building......
As the BBC story says, with the jetpack a paramedic could "fly" to a fell top in 90 seconds rather than taking 30 minutes on foot. That's important time saving. This is rugged terrain: car (even 4x4) can't get near many places; helicopter would likely take much more than 30 minutes to scramble and arrive on scene.
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 14:24
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I bet other paramedics are GNAAShing their teeth.
(sorry)
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 14:36
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Originally Posted by OldLurker View Post
As the BBC story says, with the jetpack a paramedic could "fly" to a fell top in 90 seconds rather than taking 30 minutes on foot. That's important time saving. This is rugged terrain: car (even 4x4) can't get near many places; helicopter would likely take much more than 30 minutes to scramble and arrive on scene.
And what do you think how long it will take the medic to take off the equipment, and finally get to start working on the "patient?"?

What do you think how many times it happens that a patient is only 4 flight minutes away.. If the endurance of this thing is only 8 minutes?


Nah....!
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 14:58
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Originally Posted by OldLurker View Post
As the BBC story says, with the jetpack a paramedic could "fly" to a fell top in 90 seconds rather than taking 30 minutes on foot. That's important time saving. This is rugged terrain: car (even 4x4) can't get near many places; helicopter would likely take much more than 30 minutes to scramble and arrive on scene.
But they still have to "scramble" and arrive on scene.
I've no doubt GNAAS are getting these for free or next to nothing but numbers of units are still going to be very low.
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 15:14
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Originally Posted by Tashengurt View Post
I've no doubt GNAAS are getting these for free or next to nothing but numbers of units are still going to be very low.
I was thinking the opposite - something to spend their money on
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 15:40
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Originally Posted by Tashengurt View Post
On BBC breakfast I think they mentioned a 9 minute flight time? They also mentioned using it on mountains such as Helvellyn.
I can't help wondering if the paramedic isn't going to be left up a mountain with however many lbs of rocket gear to lug down?
I imagine the medic taking the role of first responder, giving the life-saving treatment until the rest of the team get there. I can't see the heli crew refusing a lift back down! Of course the medic is going to need to be based quite close to any incident in the first place given the limited flight time. I can see limited, but realistic uses.
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 15:41
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Originally Posted by SWBKCB View Post
I was thinking the opposite - something to spend their money on
Inventor said he'd previously sold them for £340,000. I can't see the GNAAS being that flush, especially after they've just bought a new aircraft.
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 16:19
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They’re be better off sticking to polishing their own rocket rather than trying to fly one.....
Lovely boys though 😷😂😂😂
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 16:48
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Definitely reduces the time for the operative to get to the casualty - especially if they become one and the same...
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 17:25
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Originally Posted by TLDNMCL View Post
I imagine the medic taking the role of first responder, giving the life-saving treatment until the rest of the team get there. I can't see the heli crew refusing a lift back down! Of course the medic is going to need to be based quite close to any incident in the first place given the limited flight time. I can see limited, but realistic uses.

There will be massive issues with Dangerous Goods restrictions, taking the equipment and the patient back together in the same helicopter without the required paperwork....
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 17:46
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if you look at it through a narrow lens, yes it has merits.
at one time people thought hanging off a rope whilst a helicopter hovered over a patient was crazy too. What about parachuting medics into the forest? crazy too.

but, zoom back that lens and take a wider picture, there many things that wont get this off the ground in the near future.

My main concern is that this could be successful on great weather days. but how many people need rescue when the weathers perfect? right off the bat this literally severs off a huge chunk of success stories and replaces them with reports and inquiries as to what went wrong..
I could go on, but I dont think i need to convince many of you this is a good idea that will end up bad in short order.
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 18:33
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Originally Posted by GrayHorizonsHeli View Post
...My main concern is that this could be successful on great weather days. but how many people need rescue when the weathers perfect? ...
"...the Board determined due to dense fog near the summit, that the jet pack operative's glasses had become steamed up. In an attempt to wipe his glasses, the operative became temporarily inverted which caused the jet efflux to ignite his starboard trouser leg. Distracted by the burning clothing and momentarily disoriented, it is believed the operative incorrectly selected the "TOGA" power setting button which was adjacent to the "Demister" switch. The sudden increase in power caused an immediate bowel evacuation, the secondary effect of which was a CG shift which then pitched the operative back to the vertical. The fecal weight loss combined with the TOGA setting generated an immediate high velocity climb. The increased power setting consumed the remaining fuel at a far higher rate, and the jet pack flamed out shortly afterwards, while still firmly IMC. The parabolic arc described by the jet pack led to the operative arriving in a near vertical dive at a high velocity some 20 feet from the stranded hiker. The hiker reported the operative was still on fire with steamed up glasses shortly before impact. Rescuers were able to use a spatula and cigar box to recover the remains. The hiker walked down from the mountain unharmed."
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 18:38
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Gray - plenty of people need rescuing on good weather days - that is when you will find thousands of walkers and climbers in the hills. The MRT's staple fare is lower leg injuries and I've lost count of how many jobs have been like that on glorious days.

I understand the jetsuits are not exactly a quick-don or doff item so time saved getting up the hill could be offset by getting the kit sorted.

However, I want one
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 19:24
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Could be a good idea, looks like it has to hug the terrain, what is its max height ? What would happen if it had to go up a cliff face, shear drop etc, plenty of them in the Lake district.

Example could it take off and then go over a shear drop or would the pilot just fall out of the sky ?

I want one also, soon we will all be going to our local shops in/on one !
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 20:04
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Originally Posted by helipixman View Post
Could be a good idea, looks like it has to hug the terrain, what is its max height ? What would happen if it had to go up a cliff face, shear drop etc, plenty of them in the Lake district.

Example could it take off and then go over a shear drop or would the pilot just fall out of the sky ?

I want one also, soon we will all be going to our local shops in/on one !
I don’t think it has to stay low (from what I’ve seen of this device elsewhere) - my take was that it was just risk based for this role. Staying close to the ground minimises risk to the paramedic who is basically just running very quickly up the hill.
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