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JETPACK for GNAAS

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JETPACK for GNAAS

Old 1st Oct 2020, 05:50
  #41 (permalink)  
 
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I sure hope they arent doing heli rescues for those twisted ankles.

you wrap them, give them a walking stick and make them learn the lesson the hard way and walk them off the hill.
definately not life threatening on a nice sunny day
And then they fall again on the way down, only this time badly injuring themselves and now you have to get the MRT and helicopter out anyway.

Casualties who can be walked off the mountain usually are but I don't think I could walk far with a broken ankle.........
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Old 1st Oct 2020, 12:08
  #42 (permalink)  
 
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I think the point here is that like all things, the days of the manned SAR helicopter are limited. However they are not over yet, and there will be another generation of them for sure, but it may be the last.
The RAF are procuring the Tempest as their next Gen Fighter. It can be either manned or unmanned, and the Chief if the Air Staff has said it will be the UKís last fighter with a seat for a pilot. Now, I know that Air Combat and SAR are not the same sport, but the principle is clear.
Drone and UAV technology is progressing and developing at an exponential rate. I feel the most likely outcome will be other solutions being used alongside helicopters in the medium term, but in my opinion their utility will continue to increase, until they become the reference solution.

This particular device is not the solution though. This is the stone that Barnes Wallis skipped across a lake - but the bouncing bomb is coming.
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Old 1st Oct 2020, 14:02
  #43 (permalink)  
 
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And once the CAA have certified it, that 8 minutes endurance will be a problem. Alternate plus holding fuel and 5% contingency. It would never get off the ground!
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Old 1st Oct 2020, 14:26
  #44 (permalink)  
 
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Forgive me for being an old cynic but that statement by the Chief of Air Staff about the Tempest next Gen Fighter and it being manned or unmanned... Wow, the Chief of the Air Staff has said it will be the last manned fighter with a seat for a pilot... I am sure that Duncan Sands said the same thing about the Lightning back in 1957.... so forget that tosh.

This is all very complex, no point taking one paramedic to the scene of the incident by Jet Pack if you need someone else to hold the other end of the stretcher to get the customer off the mountain .... no point sending in an unmanned air ambulance to pick up an unconcious patient because they are simply not going to get into it... so hey lets send a helicopter with a doctor and a couple of paramedics ready and willing to 'Yomp' to the scene of the need!
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Old 1st Oct 2020, 15:36
  #45 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by PANews View Post
This is all very complex, no point taking one paramedic to the scene of the incident by Jet Pack if you need someone else to hold the other end of the stretcher to get the customer off the mountain .... no point sending in an unmanned air ambulance to pick up an unconcious patient because they are simply not going to get into it... so hey lets send a helicopter with a doctor and a couple of paramedics ready and willing to 'Yomp' to the scene of the need!
Solution... send two medics/ jet packs one for each end of the stretcher

Helicopter all the time !
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Old 1st Oct 2020, 15:47
  #46 (permalink)  

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Surely the technology now exists for an all weather drone to fly to the scene, autonomously grab the casualty in a device like those fluffy toy slot machines at the amusement arcades and go straight to hospital.
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Old 1st Oct 2020, 16:35
  #47 (permalink)  
 
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Drones can't do an RSI at scene... HEMS isn't just about retrieval!
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Old 1st Oct 2020, 19:05
  #48 (permalink)  
 
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Grab and Go

Well if you manage to put such a device in service ..... the drone that autonomously grabs the casualty in a device like those fluffy toy slot machines ... let me know and I will self isolate forever.... my experience of those manually guided grab slot machine is that they do not work! So there you are with your broken leg on the hillside - after your 500 foot fall - when without a by your leave this 'thing' grabs you by the scruff of the neck and drags you down the remaining 3,000 feet!

Bring it on!
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Old 1st Oct 2020, 21:23
  #49 (permalink)  

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Devil

Originally Posted by PANews View Post
Well if you manage to put such a device in service ..... the drone that autonomously grabs the casualty in a device like those fluffy toy slot machines ... let me know and I will self isolate forever.... my experience of those manually guided grab slot machine is that they do not work! So there you are with your broken leg on the hillside - after your 500 foot fall - when without a by your leave this 'thing' grabs you by the scruff of the neck and drags you down the remaining 3,000 feet!

Bring it on!
Well, having done my time as an SAR pilot and police, where we pre-dated all but one air ambulance and occasionally carried casualties off the hills and from RTAs etc, of course I was very much joking. As well as the flying claw dropping the odd casualty from its uncertain grasp, I can imagine an unwilling and struggling sheep inadvertently finding itself delivered to A & E...
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Old 1st Oct 2020, 21:41
  #50 (permalink)  
 
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Who is going to be feeding the $2 coins into the fluffy bunny machine every time it misses grabbing the patient? Could be expensive.
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Old 1st Oct 2020, 23:14
  #51 (permalink)  
 
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...Sooooo...Does anyone believe that 200 years from now we will be using manned helicopters for rescues?

Really?

There will be a time when the manned SAR capability is obsolete. Will it be in 200 years, or 100, or 50, or 20...

I donít know. But I do know itís coming.

It is inevitable.
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Old 2nd Oct 2020, 06:13
  #52 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Baldeep Inminj View Post
...Sooooo...Does anyone believe that 200 years from now we will be using manned helicopters for rescues?

Really?

There will be a time when the manned SAR capability is obsolete. Will it be in 200 years, or 100, or 50, or 20...

I donít know. But I do know itís coming.

It is inevitable.


I donīt know about you, so i am only speaking for myself now:

I donīt care what people do in 200 years from now.
I wonīt be around, and i also have no influence on that time in history......
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Old 2nd Oct 2020, 06:52
  #53 (permalink)  
 
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In 200 years, those that arenít on fire will be under sea water, so youíre more likely to need a fireproof boat.
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Old 2nd Oct 2020, 09:31
  #54 (permalink)  
 
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This concept is complete nonsense. I have been operating gas turbines in model aircraft since their inception over 20 years ago and now own 12 all installed in aircraft with over 2000 turbine flights logged. All are beautiful pieces of precision engineering and start (automatically) and run superbly. Mine have been extremely reliable but not without a very low rate of problems.

That said, there is the occasional flameout or mechanical failure, bearings, compressor or turbine blades being the main culprits fir mechanical failure, fuel system problems for flameouts.

To use these engines for life dependant functions in remote areas Is, in my opinion, ludicrous.

The Consequences of a main lift engine failure probably serious injury or fatal.

Totally unrealistic.
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Old 2nd Oct 2020, 10:37
  #55 (permalink)  
 
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Shortly expecting a word from one of our 'Single engine is super safe' brethren
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Old 2nd Oct 2020, 19:58
  #56 (permalink)  
 
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How does the Jetpack handle strong, gusty, winds?
I believe many mountain rescues are not done in flat calm conditions.
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Old 3rd Oct 2020, 08:40
  #57 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Maoraigh1 View Post
How does the Jetpack handle strong, gusty, winds?
I believe many mountain rescues are not done in flat calm conditions.
True but many are because they draw out the unfit and ill prepared.
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Old 3rd Oct 2020, 08:48
  #58 (permalink)  
 
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I'm sceptical that this will ever become a reality but if you've ever seen a HEMS team lugging their kit to a casualty you can see how one person, who perhaps got ready en-route, going ahead with this kit to provide immediate care such as CPR, defib, pain meds etc.
I don't think anyone's suggesting it's deployed alone.
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Old 3rd Oct 2020, 09:31
  #59 (permalink)  
 
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...Sooooo...Does anyone believe that 200 years from now we will be using manned helicopters for rescues?

Really?

There will be a time when the manned SAR capability is obsolete. Will it be in 200 years, or 100, or 50, or 20...

I don’t know. But I do know it’s coming.

It is inevitable.
Baldeep Inminj is offline Report Post
It is unlikely we can replace a human to actually provide healthcare en scene in the next 2o years - we will use smart glasses etc to provide instructions (as I was doing by radio in 1982!!) but some medical procedures need a human.

The mode of transport is irrelevant to the health system as long as it is safe and fast and.....cheap. So if you can produce a safe drone that carries medical team and patient and is a dollar or pound cheaper you are onto a winner. Of course, you will need room for the additional person who often provides the grunt to load the patient....currently called the pilot
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Old 4th Oct 2020, 18:26
  #60 (permalink)  
 
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I think it has been mentioned before, how much upper/lower arm strength is required to fly this Jetpack ? Jet nozzels on the end of flimsy arms, one slight twitch and the pilot will be going through the skies like a Catherine wheel ? How many jet engines have we seen mounted on a flimsy moveable pylon ? cannot think of any, they are all fixed to the airframe.

Maybe with the Catherine wheel in mind they should launch it on November 5th !
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