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Why bother with EASA?

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Why bother with EASA?

Old 9th Sep 2019, 10:39
  #21 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: East of Africa
Age: 43
Posts: 821
Don't want to open a can of worms here...

But was told by a guy from Canada how "spoilt and arrogant" I was for asking about being "sponsored" a work permit.....

He said it would show how pilots from outside Canada would "expect" to be treated like princesses.... And that-if I wanted to work on Canada-I should go over there and get myself a work permit and a Canadian license before even thinking about applying for a job....

(exaggerating his words a bit for dramatic effect).


But basically, I had contacted several US companies before...the majority does not even reply to emails, and the few who did said there was nothing they could do about the work permit (I read this as "we need pilots, but we are not willing to do all the paperwork involved in helping you getting a work permit)..

I understand that the companies would need to show proof that they have tried to hire local pilots, but failed to find some...?
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 12:57
  #22 (permalink)  

 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: White Waltham, Prestwick & Calgary
Age: 67
Posts: 3,745
That about sums it up - the trouble is that some ads are worded so tightly that only one person can fill it - they are wise to that.

Phil
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 14:16
  #23 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: California
Posts: 170
Originally Posted by hueyracer View Post
Don't want to open a can of worms here...

But was told by a guy from Canada how "spoilt and arrogant" I was for asking about being "sponsored" a work permit.....

He said it would show how pilots from outside Canada would "expect" to be treated like princesses.... And that-if I wanted to work on Canada-I should go over there and get myself a work permit and a Canadian license before even thinking about applying for a job....

(exaggerating his words a bit for dramatic effect).


But basically, I had contacted several US companies before...the majority does not even reply to emails, and the few who did said there was nothing they could do about the work permit (I read this as "we need pilots, but we are not willing to do all the paperwork involved in helping you getting a work permit)..

I understand that the companies would need to show proof that they have tried to hire local pilots, but failed to find some...?
That's why I still truely believe the pilot shortage is a load of shit! Sure, some companies need pilots, but they're not willing to lift a finger (or take two seconds to reply to an email/text/phone call) to do anything about it.

GO AIRLINES!
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 17:06
  #24 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: East of Africa
Age: 43
Posts: 821
I hear you, and I think alike....

I am for sure thinking about ditching my helicopter work and getting myself a fixed wing atp next year..

As much as I love flying helicopters (that's what I am good at-not my words)..... But I have spoken to so many companies now who all claim to be looking for pilots... Not a single one is willing to cross train or even support new pilots anyhow.... While at the same time the salaries are dropping lower and lower...

(Speaking about Utility work in Africa and Europe here..)
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 18:51
  #25 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Out West
Posts: 270
Have you told the operators who you are applying to just how good you are? Maybe you are just not selling yourself. Or perhaps you don't have the type ratings, visas and flexibility?

There is a shortage of qualified and experience helicopter pilots world wide but operators can only recruit pilots with the 'right to work' in the operators country. Some countries offer work visas to younger people, some countries encourage immigration of skilled workers and some countries offer temporary work visas. But if the government of the country want to restrict immigration then they make it very difficult (if not impossible) for employers to recruit foreign nationals. Some countries governments that are flexible charge extortionate amounts from the operator for the issue of a visa. So don't necessarily blame the operator.

If you have the right to work in the country, the appropriate licence, qualifications and experience and they need pilots then chances are you will get a job these days. But you also need to be flexible and have a good attitude....
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 19:42
  #26 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: California
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Originally Posted by Same again View Post
Have you told the operators who you are applying to just how good you are? Maybe you are just not selling yourself. Or perhaps you don't have the type ratings, visas and flexibility?

There is a shortage of qualified and experience helicopter pilots world wide but operators can only recruit pilots with the 'right to work' in the operators country. Some countries offer work visas to younger people, some countries encourage immigration of skilled workers and some countries offer temporary work visas. But if the government of the country want to restrict immigration then they make it very difficult (if not impossible) for employers to recruit foreign nationals. Some countries governments that are flexible charge extortionate amounts from the operator for the issue of a visa. So don't necessarily blame the operator.

If you have the right to work in the country, the appropriate licence, qualifications and experience and they need pilots then chances are you will get a job these days. But you also need to be flexible and have a good attitude....
I live in California where all the highly skilled people (with all the good jobs) are from Asia and India, so I know we take foreigners!
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 20:25
  #27 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Germany
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Originally Posted by Same again View Post
have a good attitude....
that‘s the main problem in the pilots world.....70% of a good pilot makes his attitude, only 30% flying skills. That‘s one of the most important facts i‘ve learnd in CRM .....
just think about it, if you wonder that nobody wants you.......
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 20:28
  #28 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Montreal
Posts: 568
Any employer just wants you to be able to do the job. Safely. Can you roll, stand and tap a fuel drum? Can you cut a couple of wires from the pump and spin the ends so you can plug into your running 206 after finding out you’re missing a canon plug? Can you night sling in the Arctic without getting all pious about a cloud and temperature? I’ve trained and tested pilots from all over the world. Training in some countries is better quality and more comprehensive than others. Some leave out off-level landings, autos, tail-rotor malfunctions and failures, confined areas, carts. EASA pilots were no better than US, Australian, or Canadian for all the extra exams they had to write. US no better than Canadian for their 150 hr cpl vs 100. Canadians in general always knew where the tail rotor was, and in a confined never confused the statistical probability of an engine failure with the certainty of a crash if you hit a wire or tree on the way in or out. Pilot shortages are engineered by regulation to protect domestic markets. EASA protects Europe, CASA Australia. Try work in Brazil, or Russia and see how welcome you are. Paco has seen both sides (btw Paco, your beloved 206 steed GBFH fell over backwards on a bad landing last month) and has pointed out how Canadian schools tailor a product for the market, and the regulator is mostly on board, except for maybe raising the bar to 125 hrs soon. I’ve seen some pretty good vertical reference and utility pilots come out of EASA with skills that would be welcome in Canada, but why expect that to be easier than a Canadian pilot going to Europe?
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Old 10th Sep 2019, 05:23
  #29 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: East of Africa
Age: 43
Posts: 821
Pilot shortages are engineered by regulation to protect domestic markets. EASA protects Europe, CASA Australia
Absolutely... Throw in the flight schools trying to make a living (hence "pushing" the message of "pilot shortage" in order to get more students), and here we are..


I also agree about the character part.... But how do you tell that from an email or a Klick on the "klick here to apply" button?



Like you said, it's all about work permits and visa...

If a country needs pilots, and can't find enough locals, the companies need to approach the government to allow visa to be given to "skilled workers"...


I think pilots had been on the skilled workers list in the US for a few years, but were taken off around 2000?
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Old 10th Sep 2019, 06:09
  #30 (permalink)  

 
Join Date: Nov 2000
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Age: 67
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" Paco, your beloved 206 steed GBFH fell over backwards on a bad landing last month)"

Where did that happen?
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Old 10th Sep 2019, 14:44
  #31 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Montreal
Posts: 568
Paco: Where did that happen?
CADORS From the description I'd guess about 60nm NNW of Whistler.
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Old 10th Sep 2019, 15:25
  #32 (permalink)  

 
Join Date: Nov 2000
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Age: 67
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Thanks! That machine sure gets around....
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Old 11th Sep 2019, 09:04
  #33 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Off the Planet
Posts: 319
It would appear that a certain member of EASA staff is following politicians' lead in peddling disinformation (fake news) at industry meetings.

What happened to peer group reviews of planned presentations by Authority members so that completely unfounded statements can be eliminated or corrected.

These actions call into question the integrity and professionalism of all members of working groups and he should apologise for presenting such a biased and flawed view.

Mars
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Old 11th Sep 2019, 10:38
  #34 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Nigeria
Age: 52
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Originally Posted by Mars View Post
It would appear that a certain member of EASA staff is following politicians' lead in peddling disinformation (fake news) at industry meetings.

What happened to peer group reviews of planned presentations by Authority members so that completely unfounded statements can be eliminated or corrected.

These actions call into question the integrity and professionalism of all members of working groups and he should apologise for presenting such a biased and flawed view.

Mars
key words that might lead to an online search showing this?
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