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Hangar crash Jandakot

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Hangar crash Jandakot

Old 30th Aug 2010, 00:46
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Hangar crash Jandakot

A HELICOPTER has crashed into a hangar while taking off at Perth's Jandakot Airport.
Police say no one's been injured, but the helicopter is on its side and leaking fuel.
Emergency services are at the airport in Perth's south.

Two people have survived a helicopter crash at Jandakot Airport.
Police say the pilot lost control of the machine during take off and the helicopter hit a hangar before landing on its side.
The pilot and a passenger escaped and a spokesman for St John Ambulance says they have minor injuries.
Emergency service personnel are at the scene to clean up fuel leaking from the helicopter.
ABC Perth
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Old 30th Aug 2010, 05:30
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forgot to turn on hydraulics


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Old 30th Aug 2010, 07:30
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The pilot of a helicopter which crashed at jandakot airport this morning said he feared it would burst into flames, killing him and his passenger.

Dick Stookes said he and a friend had been set to fly to a mate's outback station near Newman about 7am when the accident occurred.

Mr Stookes, who along with his male passenger suffered only minor injuries, said that immediately after take off he realised the Robinson R44 helicopter's hydraulics were not switched on.

With the helicopter about 1.5m off the ground he decided to land but the helicopter tipped forward slightly, clipped a hangar and crashed on to its side.

Mr Stookes said he feared for his life.

"I was concerned it was going to ignite," he said. "We were strapped in which means you cannot get free quickly so if there is a fire then you are in trouble."

Mr Stookes said he felt "extremely lucky".

He had been fielding phone calls this morning from concerned family and friends.

"I am feeling well now," he said. "I am ashamed that the helicopter is wrecked but to be alive is more important".

Emergency crews used an absorbent to clean up 250 litres of aviation gas and hydraulic fluid leaking from the black R44's roof.

A police spokesman said the AR Stookes Pty Ltd-owned aircraft crashed about 7am, landing on its side near a hangar.
The West Australian, with video report


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Old 30th Aug 2010, 08:07
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Surely (I have never been in any Robinson) it must be possible to fly an R44 without hydraulics? If you can fly a 206, Bell 47 or 350 without hydraulics, a Robbie can't be that hard....or can it?

A checklist may have been useful here as may a sensible distance between aircraft and hangar during take off.
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Old 30th Aug 2010, 09:23
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When will they learn. always read the bloody checklist. Several friends on 777s and 74s and they are 10.000hr plus pilots and guess what Checklists. And yes you can fly a 44 without HD in, if you cant you shouldn,t be in the machine. GLAD TO HEAR THE GUYS ARE FINE THOUGH BUT HOPEFULLY LESSON LEARNED. if any low timers are reading this if your instructor starts a machine without a checklist he/she will eventually miss something thats the nature of the human being. Its there for a reason the photos prove why
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Old 30th Aug 2010, 11:01
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He is extremely lucky, he really would have been lampooned had he crashed next door to a shoolyard full of children instead of a mundane looking fleet of trucks which look suspiciously as if they may contain high octane aviation fuel.

Perhaps the airport authority should re zone sections of the airport where there are suspicious looking helicopter pilots to have them engage their activities inside protective earth bunds which would contain all sorts of inadvertant liquid run off??

tet

ps
Just maybe the hyd off was a lazy man's cyclic lock whilst messing around with other things, instead of just overlooking the check list. know of a couple of blokes killed because of that. M/R blade contact with cranium.
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Old 30th Aug 2010, 11:21
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If he was 1.5 metres off the ground when he noticed, then why didn't he just switch them on ? The switch is on the cyclic !
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Old 30th Aug 2010, 12:31
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Mr Stookes, who along with his male passenger suffered only minor injuries, said that immediately after take off he realised the Robinson R44 helicopter's hydraulics were not switched on.
That statement should keep the insurance company happy.
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Old 30th Aug 2010, 12:38
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Same thing happened in South-Africa(net-star I think) a while back, but as far as I can remember ended worse for the occupants.
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Old 30th Aug 2010, 19:12
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Hydraulics off

Happened to me a few years ago, a passenger had somehow thrown the switch. Took me quite a while to figure out what the hack was happening.

This is the same as with other basic emergency training : you "learn" the recovery techniques, but not (sufficiently) the diagnosis!

But then again creating "surprises" in training could be dangerously surprising....

m2c, d3
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Old 31st Aug 2010, 03:04
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R44 hydraulics off training in flight and hover to land were both taught in my endorsement training. However, it was probably nerves which threw the pilot when he'd realised he'd done something wrong. Checklists would probably not have helped (yes, he did land the aircraft immediately) - a cool mind would have been much more useful to handle one of those beasts.
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Old 31st Aug 2010, 03:50
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Reverse, I meant a pre take off checklist, not an EOP or Abnormal one!!
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Old 31st Aug 2010, 07:42
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The before take off checks are the most important ones. If you do nothing else make sure you do these.
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Old 31st Aug 2010, 11:30
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Emergency crews used an absorbent to clean up 250 litres of aviation gas and hydraulic fluid leaking from the black R44's roof.
Do the press ever check any figures, it would be rather overweight with 250lts avgas!
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Old 31st Aug 2010, 15:45
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insider & Epiphany, I appreciate the pre-takeoff checklists are important. We have no evidence yet whether the pilot used a pre-takeoff checklist. Even if he did, some intervening event could have disturbed his flow. I once flew with an experienced instructor who went through his entire Raven II checklist, expect he'd forgotten the very first item - secure seatbelt ! Imagine his embarrassment when another pilot in a Cessna nearby kept pointing to the buckle hanging out side his door.

I think pilots are not trained enough on the "what if" sceanarios and they haven't a clue what to do if something unexpected crops up. As Tarman pointed out, he could have just switched it back on whilst in the hover.
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Old 31st Aug 2010, 18:09
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Robbos pilots tend to forget about the check list, or just ignore them...
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Old 31st Aug 2010, 20:22
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The age old arguement of the pre-take off check list for VFR flight. It's a bit type relative really - especially on ATO/CTOs. The passenger's fingernails are already missing after they realise they are flying in a 44. Imagine the consolidation of fear when their pilot (whom is far too young as far as they are concerned) pulls out the pre-start checklist.
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Old 31st Aug 2010, 20:36
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Would the collective not be a tad heavy? You don't need a checklist to realise that.
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Old 31st Aug 2010, 21:10
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Dragman,

I am not talking about a pre-start checklist. If you can't start the machine without a checklist then you shouldn't be flying. It is the checklist before you pull collective that is the important one - even in simple types like the R22. The pre-take off checks.

Are the doors closed? Are there any warning lights? Are the hydraulics on? Is it clear left and right? Not rocket science but could have prevented this and many more accidents.

I have the luxury of a company checklist and a co-pilot but pre-take off checks can be done without either and should be done by everyone regardless of type.
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Old 31st Aug 2010, 23:07
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Good habits are just as important as a checklist as you tend to carry them out without thinking about it. For example, I wobble the cyclic in a small "X" pattern before I pull pitch in any machine to check for free & easy movement, & the result is I have never taken off with the hydraulics off or the frictions on. I don't even realise I'm doing it most of the time, it just happens. Unfortunately habits take time to develop into subconscious actions, so the use of a checklist is critical to the development of habits. I agree that pulling out the hard copy checklist & working through it can be unsettling for some passengers which is why learning a pattern for your checks & practicing it until it becomes habit is so important. I don't use a hard copy in day to day operations, but I do pull it out occassionally when I'm on my own & work through it just to make sure that I haven't forgotten anything while developing my habitual checks.
The other option is to crash a machine because the hydraulics were switched off, I guarantee you'll remember to check them next time!!


There are no new ways to crash a helicopter, we just keep repeating the same mistakes others have made before us.
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