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Survivor BBC - Bell 407

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Survivor BBC - Bell 407

Old 28th Nov 2008, 08:32
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Survivor BBC - Bell 407

Thought I saw on a preview of the next episode of Survivor, a Bell 407 G-OZAC in there?
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Old 28th Nov 2008, 10:18
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Haven't realised the islands where they shoot Survivors (are we talking the team contest, or Born Survivor with Bear?) were just off the UK coast.

Is it in Irish Sea? Just point me in the right direction, my feet are freezing here this time of year.
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Old 28th Nov 2008, 16:15
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Survivor - I try to survive every day.
Can I be on TV to then?
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Old 28th Nov 2008, 16:44
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Survivor is a re-make of the 70s drama series where all but a few people are wiped out by a virulent disease (presumably contracted from a spectacularly dirty telephone!! sorry HHGTTG).

Cheers

Whirls
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Old 28th Nov 2008, 23:14
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Whirlygig,
now I recall something about it on billboard.
I think we don't have to make up viral or bacterial disease thanks to recent events, you all know the stuff from news. Just not as lethal and contagious.

Why are people so obsessed with pandemic things, apocalyptic versions of the world, etc.. Especially creating TV series..

Either way, having heli piloting skills and maintenance training could help make things easier in such times. Better get my assigments done so that I make it onto the course.
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Old 29th Nov 2008, 14:43
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Not G-OZAC

Heli is N775SB not g-ozac.

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Old 29th Nov 2008, 15:53
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Can someone explain how an N-reg aircraft gets to do commercial work in the UK then? Is it cos it's cheaper than using a CAA licensed pilot and G-reg a/c and associated costs etc?
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Old 30th Nov 2008, 16:36
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helimutt,
I can explain it: The producers know what many folks in the UK don't - that the "extra safety" and extra cost to meet CAA regulations isn't worth a warm bucket of spit.

Funny how CAA and EASA regs are used as a way to both create protective tariffs for a home market and screw the home operators and users, isn't it?
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Old 30th Nov 2008, 16:48
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I'm afraid rjsquirrel, that your explanation doesn't answer Helimutt's question unless you are aware of a loophole in the UK/JAA regs that allows foerign registered aircraft to undergo commercial work in the UK.It's unlikely that it would be classified as a private flight!

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Old 30th Nov 2008, 19:17
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Wonder if it's worth asking the BBC how they did it?? LMAO
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Old 30th Nov 2008, 19:19
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Indpendent production company, I'm afraid! I wonder if anyone at the CAA has a penchant for feeble remakes of gritty 70s drama/sci-fi?

Cheers

Whirls
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Old 30th Nov 2008, 20:40
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With regard to a foreign aircraft operating in the UK for money, ANO article 138 is the bit I think is relevant. Which amounts to get permission from the secretary of state (I think for transport) and off you go.

I don't know if thats what went on here, but it is going on in the UK now, with some European AOC holders.

Pracitcally I believe the permission comes from the DofT and the CAA don't have a great deal to do with it, but for being notified and having the right to check up on it (don't quote me on the last bit).
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Old 30th Nov 2008, 21:17
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Purely rumor and speculation.... and my bad memory...

I discussed the pro's and con's of buying a G-reg vs N-reg in London a few years ago with a local FBO, and the "answer" to how an N-reg aircraft could be used for commercial work was that the aircraft was hired out sans pilot, and the entity using the aircraft had to provide the pilot.

Throw in a special purpose company to be this middle man and bob's your N-reg flying uncle.

Sounded like to much hassle so didn't bother validating against the regs.

This was in ~ 1999.

Can anyone here comment if this was actually ever (or still is) the case?
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Old 1st Dec 2008, 04:47
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Would it be the same way N, VH and G and all of the others can operate in any country. Surely they can't say that you can't fly anything in a country unless it's registered there. Make it a bit hard to conduct international operations.................
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Old 2nd Dec 2008, 20:38
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Non-EU registered aircraft working in the UK

DofT should receive requests from non EU registered aircraft operators to operate in the UK. DofT should then establish if any existing UK based operator is able to supply an aircraft that is capable and able to do the job. If they recive no replies from UK based operators then the foreign applicant can accept the work.
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Old 3rd Dec 2008, 22:45
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So that would be a 'No you can't use that N-Reg a/c here for commercial work matey!' type answer?
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Old 3rd Dec 2008, 23:00
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I do believe a company may use an "N" registered aircraft in the UK for it's own company business activities (corporate use etc), without permission from the DofT provided it isn't used for the purposes of "aerial work".
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Old 4th Dec 2008, 00:09
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It can as it's then classified as "private work"; however, filming is usually aerial work and if there are any actors or film crew on board, then it's public transport!

Cheers

Whirls
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Old 4th Dec 2008, 01:03
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What rule allows all the various N, ZK, VH and other airliners to fly scheduled and charter flights in Europe?
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Old 4th Dec 2008, 06:33
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The rule explained in post #15?

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Whirls
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