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Air Ambulance in UK

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Air Ambulance in UK

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Old 11th May 2008, 09:06
  #41 (permalink)  
 
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Word on the street is 1st week in June, Filton, EC135.

Will it, won't it, will it.........?
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Old 2nd Jun 2008, 09:02
  #42 (permalink)  
 
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The awaited press release

http://www.shephard.co.uk/rotorhub/D...b-fd5280acd77a
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Old 25th Mar 2013, 18:16
  #43 (permalink)  
 
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UK Helimed News

Cornwall to Expand Air Ambulance Capacity

Cornwall Air Ambulance Trust has announced that it will have a second aircraft from the end of next year.

The charity has signed a contract with a new operator, Medical Aviation Services (MAS).

It comes into force from December 2014.

The charity said the new aircraft would be able to fly night time missions and would be able to fly further and carry more weight than the current helicopters.

Paula Martin, chief executive of the air ambulance trust, said: "We understand that there are emergency missions we're not getting to at the moment.

"This is mainly because we're already doing another job somewhere else.

"We can see that the need and demand [for a second aircraft] is there and we've been working towards that goal."

Last year the Duchess of Cornwall officially opened the charity's new headquarters at Newquay Airport, following a 1m grant from the European Union.

Cornwall's air ambulance has been flying since 1987.
BBC News - Cornwall Air Ambulance to have second helicopter
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Old 25th Mar 2013, 18:34
  #44 (permalink)  
 
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Fly further and carry more weight? Genuine question: how much more and how much further does a 902 do? Nice to see MAS are sorting clearance for night missions as well as Bond. If two companies are doing the work it may speed the civil servants up.
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Old 25th Mar 2013, 19:36
  #45 (permalink)  
 
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Seeing as the average mission is not life threatening cant see why they need 2 !
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Old 25th Mar 2013, 20:35
  #46 (permalink)  
 
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jayeeto

where does it say its a exploder i thought mas have got into 135s now
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Old 25th Mar 2013, 20:53
  #47 (permalink)  
 
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As a long time pilot of the Kernow AA, I would suggest someone audits the trust before this is cleared to go...
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Old 25th Mar 2013, 21:15
  #48 (permalink)  
 
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Please excuse my ignorance on this matter but I wanted to ask, why is it that the government have no problem funding police helicopter operations and leave ambulance helicopters to raise their own money?

I don't want to put down police helicopters for a second but can I ask, are they bagging murderers and rapists most of the time or are they mainly involved in supporting the arrest of petty thieves and people growing cannabis under their roofs?

Last question, could local councils or regional authorities hold a referendum asking the people of each county whether they would prefer to have their taxes spent on supporting a police helicopter or an ambulance helicopter?
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Old 25th Mar 2013, 21:40
  #49 (permalink)  
 
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MD600, they have a 135 now, so how can a 135 improve a 135?
I am not stirring, it is a genuine question as they are stating it to the press. I am experienced (3000) on 135 but know little about the 902 or 145. What aircraft will they be using?
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Old 25th Mar 2013, 22:24
  #50 (permalink)  
 
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It is assumed that they will be providing an MD902 because that is what they [MAS] operate now. It mentions two but does not yet explain what 'two' is. Is that 2 aircraft 24/7/365 or some other permutation? It may simply be a guaranteed aircraft during downtime [but I think not].

There are no NEW 902s available with an enhanced spec before 2015 [if then].

There may be other second hand 902s available for the company to acquire.

SAS/PAS/MAS has ordered AW169s but they are significantly larger than most current air ambulances in the UK.

I would expect it will come obvious in time for the launch day.
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Old 25th Mar 2013, 23:47
  #51 (permalink)  
 
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SARWanabe

Well I fly in Cornwall teaching people regularly so hear and see what goes on, when it is called out to a suspected broken leg on a rugby pitch less than a few miles from Treliske you have to wonder.
That and base both ac in the same hanger ?
Their admin costs now outweigh what the helicopter actually costs, suppose griffo knows best
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Old 26th Mar 2013, 10:18
  #52 (permalink)  
 
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Hughes: whoa there boy! Admin costs outgrowing running costs of chopper - I think not. A HEMS outfit costs circa 1.2 - 1.5 mil/year....

Don't label a HEMS outfit because of one low level response task. Cornwall is MASSIVE and 2 choopers would easily provide a better service.

The public has spoken, the public are comfortable putting their hands in their pockets for a dedicated 2 ship HEMS operation. God bless public opinion.
[If it had been government driven, the existing cab would probably have been traded in for an older model and limited to 'x' hours per year!].

Don't ever knock the HEMS setup in the UK when it is charity controlled - it is a reflection of joe average and their desires.
[Addendum: With the exception of that alleged crooked operation called the child air ambulance outfit]
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Old 26th Mar 2013, 21:40
  #53 (permalink)  
 
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when it is called out to a suspected broken leg on a rugby pitch less than a few miles from Treliske
Hmm...I wish a helicopter had come and picked me up when I dislocated my elbow on Salisbury Plain, only a few miles by Landrover from the medical centre.
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Old 26th Mar 2013, 22:48
  #54 (permalink)  
 
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The Trust clearly has the money to fund a second aircraft. It has over the years built up a sizeable income through raising its profile and fantastic fundraising. You can't go into a shop in Cornwall without seeing one of their charity boxes by the till. The people of Cornwall are very proud of their Air Ambulance and are prepared to fund it.
The new HQ at Newquay is also very efficient by having the aircraft co-located with the Charity, which means corporate sponsors can get the tour and then be persuaded to put their hands in their pockets.
Also, and I quote, having visited last year, the hangar was designed to accommodate 2 EC145 size aircraft.
Best of luck to them I say. And don't forget - probably at least 3 more pilot jobs being created!
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Old 26th Mar 2013, 23:58
  #55 (permalink)  
 
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Parked next door to the Bristow SAR cabs no doubt
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Old 27th Mar 2013, 08:31
  #56 (permalink)  
 
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The charity was offered land for free within 1 mile of Treliske hospital. This would have saved the repositioning back and forward to Newquay which must be about .4 hours every time.
The head of the charity wanted to be at Newquay as there was an ILS there, thats fine but there isnt an ILS at Treliske so if you need to get to Newquay IFR then you aint going to get the patient to the hospital.
I dont have a problem with air ambulances but they are starting to go down the line of the primary first reponse to any call out. Lets remember it is about the " golden hour" we seem to be going down the avenue of having ever more sophisticated and expensive bits of kit going out to pick people up who's lives are not in danger.
As for having 2 helicopters in one place, why not do as Devon has done, have 2 one in the North one in the South. yes I know in Cornwall it would be East and West In fact it would be more efficient for the Eaglescott based Devon one to cover East Cornwall as well as N Devon,
In fact if we will have 4 helicopters covering less than 2 million people not a bad ratio, perhaps I should shut up as I live in the area so my chances of a free ride when i come off my mountain bike will be better than anywhere else in the country
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Old 27th Mar 2013, 15:06
  #57 (permalink)  
 
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H500,

Why don't you get involved as a trustee, I bet they are always on the lookout for people willing to get involved. Then you can help provide the oversight that the trustee group provides.

Then you can ask the difficult questions (or be on the inside pissing out of the tent, rather than vice versa).

I have no idea if the Cornwall operation is good or bad. But sometimes what appears on the surface to be black or white is actually just a shade of grey.
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Old 27th Mar 2013, 16:47
  #58 (permalink)  
 
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206 jock: well said.

Whitehead: not completely accurate. Our Police/HEMS outfit was a victim of its outstanding success. We (in hindsight) took it that little bit too far and exchanged one police officer for a paramedic and proved that a paramedic could do the job of a police observer (TFO) AND still remain a paramedic. Flying a T1 meant we had no problems with carrying capacity. In fact we were the only Police or HEMS helicopter in GB that could carry 2 casualties and we did it on the odd occasion.
The problem with our success was that the Ambulance Authority realised they could lose future paramedics to the police world and the UEO's realised they were losing police officer (TFO) slots.
The service was wound down quietly and slowly and reverted to type (police ops) sadly for all involved.

Hughes: Be very very grateful you live not only in what for many, is the most beautiful part of England and Wales but your HEMS cover per head of population is probably the best in the world
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Old 27th Mar 2013, 20:56
  #59 (permalink)  
 
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TC

You are dam right, but what worries me is that Cornwall is one of the poorest counties in the UK so long term can it afford 13 staff, a " glass hanger " and 2 helicopters.
Please dont get me wrong i am an ardent supporter of the service but am worreid it is going passed what it was originally designed for and hence will be unsustainable as machines and staff get ever more expensive. The ultimate one end will be having a chinook with full " doc and hospital in the back a la Afgan
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Old 27th Mar 2013, 21:26
  #60 (permalink)  
 
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H500 et al

Perhaps as the designer of the original modus operandi of the Cornwall AA I can enlighten you a little.

During the daytime (we are talking 1987) we had 17 emergency ambulances covering the county of Cornwall. At night this reduced to 11. Our problems were many but the main ones were:

1. Clinical - in that we only had 8 extended trained ambulance men (call them paramedics but that title didn't come until years later) so delivering that high level of skill countywide was only possible using the AA.
2. Logistical - when vehicles were sent on a call (all 999 calls had to be responded to in those days) the crew could be taken out of service for anything up to four hours given that our receiving hospitals were so few and located at Truro and Plymouth. During those four hours dealing with what may just be a broken finger or a nosebleed a patient in the now vacant area may suffer a heart attack or stroke. We met this challenge by having a three layered plan - a. HEMS style first responder b. secondary transfer in which the AA rendezvous with the road ambulance at a pre-surveyed site and delivers the patient to hospital leaving the road ambulance inside its normal area. c. tertiary inter-hosital transfer.

Chucking rocks at the AA for carrying low-level injuries has to be a cheap shot but one we expected and were not disappointed. People's ignorance of the realities of running an ambulance service has to be expected but once the situation has been explained most seemed to a accept that a rapid resolution of all 999 calls is the best all-round solution. You never know what the next call will be. The overall efficiency of the service as a whole was our design aim but I observe that this principle is nowadays often sacrificed to satisfy the rock-chuckers and give the AA charity a peaceful time even if this does not serve the public who finance the AA as well as it might.

G
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