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Agusta A119 Koala Info

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Agusta A119 Koala Info

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Old 28th Dec 2018, 14:15
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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There is a substantial difference between the 'stability' of a fixed-wing aircraft and a helicopter - important for flight in IMC and the rigours of IFR.

If you look at Appendix B to Part 27 (CS or FAR) you will see that most additional regulations address stability issues.
JimL,
there are some SE helicopters with SAS and Autopilot. We had a As350b3 with sas and autopilot some years ago. I think this is not an issue. Any manufacturer would be interested to install SAS and autopilot on their SE helicopters to make them IFR capable.

H.
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Old 28th Dec 2018, 20:33
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by HeliHenri View Post
That's the figures for the first 3 quarters of 2018.
About the 139, 44 produced so far that is a very good result (as usual).
I don't have a view about the qualities of the AW119, I can only note that in Switzerland, there are on the register 1 AW119 and about 80 H125/130.
.
There are also a bunch of Robinsons, maybe there lies your answer.
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Old 29th Dec 2018, 20:36
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PM your email address and I'll put something together via Dropbox, have RFM and ground training manuals etc
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Old 30th Dec 2018, 13:16
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by helops View Post
JimL,
there are some SE helicopters with SAS and Autopilot. We had a As350b3 with sas and autopilot some years ago. I think this is not an issue. Any manufacturer would be interested to install SAS and autopilot on their SE helicopters to make them IFR capable.

H.
It's about controllability without hydraulics and secondary electrical generation requirements.
I was flying a Bell 206L-3 in the early 2000s that was fully IFR certified, of course the additional weight (plus my "skinny" med crew) prevented any sort of realistic IFR fuel load) for most of the legs we flew.
We did regular RT in the hood without hydraulics (SASless can confirm). SAS and autopilot alone do not meet the criteria, otherwise every lightweight 206L-1 or Crapstar 350 could be certified.
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Old 30th Dec 2018, 15:07
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It's about controllability without hydraulics and secondary electrical generation requirements.
  1. There are single engine helicopters with dual hyd. (EC130, and some AS350B3e)
  2. Secondary electrical generation: it is possible to install 2 generators on the same engine like it is used on airplanes like TBM850 or Pilatus 12 etc.
I can't see the problem..
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Old 30th Dec 2018, 23:03
  #26 (permalink)  
 
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Lots of IFR training in SE, doesn't make them suitable for actual hard IFR though.
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Old 31st Dec 2018, 21:19
  #27 (permalink)  
 
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Prolly the same reasoning that says singles shouldn't be used for ems/night/nvg/SAR. What are the stats, exactly - how many machines have been lost due to engine failure, as opposed to mgb, tail rotor, drive shaft etc failure? Vested interest here, been flying single ems/SAR for a decade now, maybe time to quit...
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Old 1st Jan 2019, 11:01
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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Usual reason for EMS singles having accidents is CFIT or inadvertent IMC in an under-equipped machine.
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Old 8th Jan 2019, 11:41
  #29 (permalink)  
 
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Just to correct a couple of points firstly the bit about single engine aeroplanes flying at 25,000 feet kinda excludes all the PA 28's and other small fixed wing aircraft that regularly fly IFR in IMC at much much lower levels all without issue,not to mention the cloud base will be the same no matter how high you started from, and I would much rather pop out low level in a slow helicopter than a fast plane.

Secondly speaking from experience a stabilized helicopter is a lot easier to fly in IMC than an un-stabilized aeroplane , and even without SAS it's not a huge problem for short periods of time so long as you keep it simple and ask for help as you would only be IMC without SAS if you had a problem

I think the bigger issue is a lack of experience among the helicopter community of flying in IMC on shore, which has produced and maybe rightly so a very adverse opinion to it, where as in the fixed wing world it's just normal. The other thing to consider is that if it was easier to certify singles for IMC the equipment in them would rapidly improve as would skill and experience levels, lets not forget no one is going to force anyone to fly anything in IMC if they don't wont to! its about providing a means that minimizes risk for those who do want to

CBS
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Old 9th Jan 2019, 16:05
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I think the bigger issue is a lack of experience among the helicopter community of flying in IMC on shore, which has produced and maybe rightly so a very adverse opinion to it, where as in the fixed wing world it's just normal. The other thing to consider is that if it was easier to certify singles for IMC the equipment in them would rapidly improve as would skill and experience levels, lets not forget no one is going to force anyone to fly anything in IMC if they don't wont to! its about providing a means that minimizes risk for those who do want to
yes totally agree
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Old 9th Jan 2019, 21:03
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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http://m.www.marenco-swisshelicopter...h09-helicopter


it seems that marenco will install garmin 3000 on their single engine helicopter SH09

Garmin 3000 is an IFR tool. It means that the single engine SH09 will be waiting for SE IFR certification soon. It is nonsense installing such an expensive avionics on a VFR only helicopter. Let's hope SE IFR will soon become a normal thing.

Last edited by helops; 9th Jan 2019 at 23:23.
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