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Agusta A119 Koala Info

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Agusta A119 Koala Info

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Old 30th Jan 2007, 18:22
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Agusta A119 Koala Info

Hi there to all the chopper guys.
I was wondering if there is ant web or site where I could find manuals for helicopters, particullary I would be very interested to get the Augusta A119 Koala Flight Manual or somethin similar....
All the info and answers would be welcome.
Many thanks in advance.
Cheers.
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Old 31st Jan 2007, 12:44
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I haven't got a A119 manual, but have flown a A119 (800 hours+) and could probable answer some questions on this fine helicopter.
Manuals come with the a/c.

Are you considering buying a A119?
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Old 31st Jan 2007, 16:08
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Agusta

Hi,
just a small thing, its Agusta (only 1 u)

greetings

RB
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Old 31st Jan 2007, 16:26
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Augusta A119 Koala

Looking down from the front page you'll never guess what
I managed to read the thread title as.

Ingested Koala.

Just for a moment the mind boggles.....

How the F***? Koala in........where???????

Oh well..

Made me laugh.

DaveA
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Old 31st Jan 2007, 16:51
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Being a perfectionist....please remember that AGUSTA is spelt Agusta
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Old 31st Jan 2007, 17:03
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I just called my friends at Augusta and there is no manual and there are only 36 holes and being winter the course is not in top shape. The boys in georgia would love to have 119 but they just do not have the real estate for it. Any book store will have plenty of info on the Augusta country club and golf course but there is no official manual per se.


Augusta is a town in Georgia and has a nice golf course

Agusta in Italy builds wonderful flying art in the form of a helicopter.

Brent
Agusta Pilot
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Old 1st Feb 2007, 08:55
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I would be in Detox if I played the augusta 119 hole course with a beer every hole. Worth a try though.
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Old 26th Dec 2018, 22:16
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AW119 IFR

https://helihub.com/2018/12/21/th-119-helicopter-performs-first-flight/

It seems that AW119 will be soon IFR certified. This will be the only single engine ifr helicopter certified nowadays.

What do you think about the future of single engine ifr? I think that other reliable helicopters like Bell 407 or AS350B3 could follow the route of the AW119.

H.
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Old 26th Dec 2018, 22:35
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This will be the only single engine ifr helicopter certified nowadays.
Bong! Wrong! Take off all your clothes.

Plenty of fully IFR B206 jetBangers around, flew them myself for 5 years recently. Autopilot, glass screens, flew well.
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Old 26th Dec 2018, 23:01
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Originally Posted by Ascend Charlie View Post
Bong! Wrong! Take off all your clothes.

Plenty of fully IFR B206 jetBangers around, flew them myself for 5 years recently. Autopilot, glass screens, flew well.
This is the actual quote from the article: “making it the only single-engine IFR-certified helicopter in production in decades.”

ie in production.
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Old 27th Dec 2018, 01:06
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Ahhh... terminology, Bloggs!

But how much "production" is actually happening with the Kerwarla?
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Old 27th Dec 2018, 05:06
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Originally Posted by Ascend Charlie View Post
Ahhh... terminology, Bloggs!

But how much "production" is actually happening with the Kerwarla?
A lot actually. The Koala line is flat out busy in Philly and always has been.
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Old 27th Dec 2018, 07:21
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Why is SE ifr helicopter more difficult to certify than SE ifr airplane? As far as I know many SE airplanes have been certified many years ago, even for commercial air transport now under EASA i.e. Pilatus PC12, TBM900, Piper PA46 .. All single engine turbine with pratt engines PT-6. Why it is so difficult for helicopters? It would solve a lot of problems in our company where in foggy days, and there are a lot of them during winter, we have to use expensive twins.
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Old 27th Dec 2018, 10:42
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Originally Posted by helops View Post
Why is SE ifr helicopter more difficult to certify than SE ifr airplane?
I imagine that it is something along these lines:

SE IFR aeroplane has an engine failure at 25,000 feet. With altitude and glide performance, it probably still has a number of options to recover safely(ish).

SE IFR helicopter has an engine failure at 2-3000 feet. Less so.
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Old 27th Dec 2018, 11:35
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The bit that is missing is controllability IMC with HYD failure - most singles don't have DUAL HYD.

To meet the certification requirements for stability and/or level of reliability of the HYD and SAS is an issue. If you do not meet the requirements you have to demonstrate recovery to visual conditions for up to 30 mins HYD OFF and IMC.

That would be fun even on a good day - you would be busy!
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Old 27th Dec 2018, 11:54
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Some SE helicopters have dual hydraulic systems. EC130B4/T2 and some AS350B3e have dual hyd as well. If this would be the problem for IFR certification, then all SE helicopters would be equipped with dual Hyd. Airbus helicopters as well as bell and marenco are interested in certifying SE IFR machines.
This should be the future.
The only problem could be the glide ratio 4:1 for helicopters compared to 12:1 of an airplane like pilatus or tbm. But at the same time, if we think of an airplane engine failure at low altitude then I do not understand. At 25000 feet okay you still can glide for 30 min. What about the take off or landing phases?

Last edited by helops; 27th Dec 2018 at 15:07.
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Old 27th Dec 2018, 13:15
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Originally Posted by noooby View Post
A lot actually. The Koala line is flat out busy in Philly and always has been.
Really ?
So it must be a very small line.
Only 11 AWKoala builded so far this year compared to 36 B407 and 100 H125/130.
.
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Old 27th Dec 2018, 20:30
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Eleven? Are you sure? There are 4 or 5 on the production line at any one time. Remember, there are less than 400 total in the world built. When 139 orders dropped off with O&G recession, Koala orders picked up, especially China.
Production line tight for space now in Philly with 139 but also because of 609. It takes up half of the production hall!
It is expensive to purchase but is fast to fly and very responsive. It is actually certified on the 109 Type Cert, hence it carries many systems from the 109 twin (Dual Helipilot, Dual Hyd for instance) as standard. This adds $$$. But you can cruise at 145-150 knots if you like. And carry 8 including pilot.
I'd like to see someone put the HTS900 in it to see how it goes. Better hot and high and lower fuel consumption. PT6 is nice but it really sucks the fuel.
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Old 28th Dec 2018, 08:11
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Helops,

There is a substantial difference between the 'stability' of a fixed-wing aircraft and a helicopter - important for flight in IMC and the rigours of IFR.

If you look at Appendix B to Part 27 (CS or FAR) you will see that most additional regulations address stability issues.

Jim
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Old 28th Dec 2018, 08:53
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Originally Posted by noooby View Post
Eleven? Are you sure?
That's the figures for the first 3 quarters of 2018.
About the 139, 44 produced so far that is a very good result (as usual).
I don't have a view about the qualities of the AW119, I can only note that in Switzerland, there are on the register 1 AW119 and about 80 H125/130.
.
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