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Mosquito ultralight helicopter

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Mosquito ultralight helicopter

Old 4th May 2004, 12:11
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Mosquito ultralight helicopter

My professional opinion has been asked of this wee beastie which eminates, as many oddball flying machines do, from California.

I can obviously comment technically on it from the information they've published, but does anybody have any experience, realible rumour or informed opinion to share on the subject?

Actually I suspect that it's probably the desk-fan from Shawn Coyle's office in Mojave.

G
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Old 4th May 2004, 14:03
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G,

Based on what is available on the web, the design feature that jumps out as a concern is the fact that they are demanding rather a lot of that little 2-stoke engine, operating at high power ratings for rather a lot of the time. Those engines were designed for target drones and UAV's and hence where never designed to last 'forever', shall we say. Therefore, my initial concern would be that of engine failure. This is a particular problem since there is clearly no crash protection and I see no reference to the amount of inertia designed into the rotorsystem - hmm!?. In addition I feel the tripod undercarriage provides increased scope for roll-over, though they do seem to offer a wide skid gear as an option.

One final point, have you looked through BCAR-VLH to ensure that it will get through, as without that it can't fly in the UK anyway.


I have to say that if it were a member of my family I would have to advise against it.

Safe Flying
CRAN
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Old 4th May 2004, 15:01
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First of all, it's not the fan in my office... I wish I had a fan in my office some days, but the 50mph winds often take care of that.

My comment on this machine is that without a windshield or other structure out front ((which appears to be optional) it is going to be very difficult to orient yourself with the world, as far as attitude goes. This proved to be a problem in some autogyros, and as this appears to have a teetering rotor system, it could be a problem here if someone puts in too much forward stick too quickly. (I haven't studied the technical details)
In the clean configuration, I'd also be suspicious of the directional stability - there is not a lot of surface area aft of the rotor (which is where I assume the CG is), and quite a bit ahead of it. In forward flight this could be a bit of a handful.
There is only one picture with a fuselage of any sort, and no pictures of the fuselage version flying...
I haven't worked out the numbers yet on the performance, but I assume that the altitudes they are talking about are density altitudes.
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Old 4th May 2004, 15:31
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Thanks for that chaps.

I confess that I'm not all that keen on the idea of the MZ202 in there either - there are places for a 2-stroke running constantly at or above MCP, but I'm somewhat unconvinced it's in a helicopter - presumably they've been forced that way because of the US FAR103 empty weight rules, and, say, a de-rated Rotax 912 would make me feel much more comfortable!


Agree concerning directional stability (and pitch damping?), I'd also noted that there seems absolutely no form of A/V between the fuselage and ground, which may or not offer potential for ground resonance problems.


The attitude reference issue is interesting - presumably this is going to have static stability characteristics in the same ballpark as, say, an R22, and if that's the case, the pilot is likely to need all the help they can get.

We're a little away from lining it up against BCAR-VLH (and at present I'm mostly being asked whether it's worth progressing to any detailed design investigation); as I said, I'm mostly trying to find out any interesting scuttlebut. Nonetheless many thanks for the thoughts.

Any thoughts about the proposal that anybody flying such a beastie should have "at least" 10 hours (total) of helicopter flight training on a postcard to the manufacturer please

Cheers,

G
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Old 4th May 2004, 15:43
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Devil

SC _ Check the video page. There is a picture of the 'Skinned' version at the hover or in flight!!
Interesting enough...considering the cost. I wonder if the t/r is belt driven or shaft???

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Old 4th May 2004, 16:16
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My number one rule these days is never to fly anything that might involve using one's harse as a hundercarriage and this machine definitely fits into that category.

NO WAY am I that desperate to fly an office chair.

Nor fly in a machine that appears to be so tight on performance that the pilot can't even wear trousers!
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Old 4th May 2004, 18:30
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Thumbs up

Looks like it would be a fun hobby for the mechanically inclined adventurer, but a little too reminiscent of the Mini-500 (a.k.a. "mini death trap"). Just to make sure we are all looking at the right section, together...

http://www.innovatortech.ca/mosquitoxe.htm

And the tripod version of the same (can you say dynamic rollover)...

http://www.innovatortech.ca/xespecs.htm

Last edited by RDRickster; 4th May 2004 at 22:07.
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Old 4th May 2004, 22:01
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CRAN is correct. Two-stroke engines are not very reliable, but due to weight, they are used in just about all very light homebuilt helicopters. The following comparison is therefore not exceptionally meaningful, but it might be of interest.

The Mini-500 has a GW of 840 pounds and the engine is a 2-cylinder, 581 cc Rotax 582.
The Mosquito has a GW of 610 pounds and the engine is a 2-cylinder, 625 cc
Zanzottera mz202.


A little more info;
The mz202 is also a consideration for the 550 pound SynchroLite

Last edited by Dave_Jackson; 5th May 2004 at 01:15.
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Old 5th May 2004, 04:52
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The Mosquito does indeed come with an attractive skin. My main concern with the beast was the tripod undercarriage but now there is a skidded version.

I fully intend to build one of these in approximately 5 years as a retirement project.

I didnt see any reference to an offer of an engine upgrade.
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Old 6th May 2004, 09:09
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Interesting Link here G to a machine that proved both safe and practical , even more so when unpiloted!


http://www.gyrodynehelicopters.com/the_rotorcycle.htm


Wunper
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Old 4th Oct 2013, 08:33
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Hi there. I know this is a very old thread but I came across it searching the web for information on the mosquito helicopter. I also found this impressive video which I wanted to share. It shows the mosquito doing autos from a hover and u high as well as hand-off hovering controlling it only through weight shift. I am not a helicopter pilot or expert and would love to hear what you guys have to say about this.

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Old 22nd Jul 2020, 11:20
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Homemade ultralight mosquito helicopter

I think I would prefer a Robinson R22 than this little baby.
Just listen to the numbers and I am not sure about the gaffer tape to secure the ballast on the tail boom !!!!

https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=2595651367353922
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Old 22nd Jul 2020, 17:36
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I would not wear that thing for a pension.
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Old 22nd Jul 2020, 19:11
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To paraphrase from Blackadder:
If we have to fly a Mosquito sir, what should we do?

Well, the normal procedure is to leap 200 feet into the air and scatter yourself over a large area.
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Old 22nd Jul 2020, 21:06
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A neighbour of mine at the time bought one of these things about 7 years ago. I don't think that he has flown it more than 2' above the ground ever since.
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Old 22nd Jul 2020, 21:32
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Originally Posted by pulse1 View Post
A neighbour of mine at the time bought one of these things about 7 years ago. I don't think that he has flown it more than 2' above the ground ever since.
Not near Bewdley by any chance?
Anyone remember ‘Bugdevheli’ who graced these pages a few years ago with his own similar designs...?
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Old 22nd Jul 2020, 22:38
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Originally Posted by pulse1 View Post
A neighbour of mine at the time bought one of these things about 7 years ago. I don't think that he has flown it more than 2' above the ground ever since.
That's been my experience with most of these craft.. They are mostly hovered and not flown at altitude. Probably for a good reason, but while hovering probably seems exciting and cool to the uninitiated, I think most of us will agree it gets old rather fast...

I was at a gathering of homebuilt/ultralight helicopters once, and was surprised to learn that all but one had been trucked/trailered to the airport, again, because most of the people had no intention of getting higher than a hover.

I've always been of the opinion that if Bell and Sikorsky et all struggle to produce machines that reliably don't fall out of the sky, what hope does some random guy with a hacksaw and a rivet gun have?

Reminds me of the day probably 25 years ago watching a guy pounding on the rotorhead of a Rotorway Exec with a very large hammer. Seems like the sort of thing that might cause the machine to get even by disintegrating in flight, but here we are 25 years later and that guy is still flying ( a rather cool semi antique turbine that is the envy of all, me included ) so perhaps it is I that doesn't understand the proper way to persuade these machines to fly.
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Old 23rd Jul 2020, 01:40
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Originally Posted by Paul Cantrell View Post
That's been my experience with most of these craft.. They are mostly hovered and not flown at altitude. Probably for a good reason, but while hovering probably seems exciting and cool to the uninitiated, I think most of us will agree it gets old rather fast...

I was at a gathering of homebuilt/ultralight helicopters once, and was surprised to learn that all but one had been trucked/trailered to the airport, again, because most of the people had no intention of getting higher than a hover.

I've always been of the opinion that if Bell and Sikorsky et all struggle to produce machines that reliably don't fall out of the sky, what hope does some random guy with a hacksaw and a rivet gun have?

Reminds me of the day probably 25 years ago watching a guy pounding on the rotorhead of a Rotorway Exec with a very large hammer. Seems like the sort of thing that might cause the machine to get even by disintegrating in flight, but here we are 25 years later and that guy is still flying ( a rather cool semi antique turbine that is the envy of all, me included ) so perhaps it is I that doesn't understand the proper way to persuade these machines to fly.
I actually hovered one of these but refused point blank to get out of ground effect. Had a two stroke motor out of a jetski or skidoo as I recall. Horrible thing. I was probably in it for a maximum of 5 minutes and that was more than enough!
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Old 23rd Jul 2020, 03:55
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There's only one Mosquito worthy of the name, hands up who wouldn't want one, assuming you could afford it.



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Old 23rd Jul 2020, 12:51
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A little over 20 hours in the Air version with circuits at 1000’, a number of autos and everything in between. My role was testing as it was the first of type in NZ. I survived but it was an interesting experience and much of what has been said is so true. Flying without reference, as you were simply sitting on a small chair and all you could see out front was your feet and a few simple gauges was initially very wired.

As it was open the engine provided the necessary heat to keep warm but the general High rpm was A bit concerning. I did the required 20 hours of testing and then handed it back to the owner and promised my wife that I would not take on such tasks again. My recommendation to anyone thinking of an experimental helicopter would be find another hobby or buy a certified one like a 22, H300 or G2.
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