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Wrong Engine Shutdown?

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Wrong Engine Shutdown?

Old 8th Apr 2006, 16:51
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Wrong Engine Shutdown?

I am trying to track down any accidents/incidents where the crew shut down the wrong engine (for any reason - but usually confusion).

Eliminate GA (where it can happen through lack of currency or experience). But including corporate......

Does anybody know of any other than Kegworth?

Replies on here or to [email protected]
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Old 8th Apr 2006, 20:27
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Seem to remember reading one of those accident reports that the CAA or AIB? issue monthly that an ATP out of hawarden for bae systems shut down the wrong engine in the climb out on a single engine test by selecting the wrong engine for the memory items.

About Three years ago, very sketchy, hope it helps though!
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Old 9th Apr 2006, 01:44
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Beech 99: (empty flight) f/o pulled fuel lever on engine on climb out to "test" the capt, but stomped on the opposite rudder! Capt immediately shut down good engine. Rest was history- nobody hurt.
bob.
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Old 9th Apr 2006, 03:06
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Try a search for
"Britsh Midland Airways 8th Jan - 89"

Wrong engine shut down....
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Old 9th Apr 2006, 09:53
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ATP ex Hawarden

searched Hawarden
and ATP
without success
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Old 10th Apr 2006, 02:57
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Try Google or buy the book
Air Disaster Vol 2
by Macarther Job
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Old 11th Apr 2006, 08:49
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There was also a Binter CN-235 intending to land at Malaga in 2001.

There was a fire warning when at the approach phase, and the PNF shut down both engines when trying to discharge the second bottle.

Rgds
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Old 14th Apr 2006, 10:59
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STN? PIK? around 1976

Something like that about 30 years ago at Stanstead, possibly PIK, BA 707 doing a check flight with Engine Failure on Take-off.

Story I heard was that the instructor shut down (to idle) an engine on one side, but the pilot under training, or being checked, hit the rudder the wrong way. Then (so I heard) the instructor/check-pilot realised what was happening so brought the engine back up at the same time as idling the one on the other side, as the Pf reversed the pedals.

Can't remember if above was in the official report, or just the story "going around at the time".

Anyway, the aircraft was written off (fire, fortunately right outseide STN's fire station) and fortunately no injuries apart from a damaged ankle from the evacuation.

"Correct me if I'm wrong!"
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Old 14th Apr 2006, 14:17
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Originally Posted by ExSimGuy
"Correct me if I'm wrong!"
It was Prestwick, 17/3/77, and technically it was British Airtours.
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Old 14th Apr 2006, 14:23
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Originally Posted by Bob Lenahan
Beech 99: (empty flight) f/o pulled fuel lever on engine on climb out to "test" the capt, but stomped on the opposite rudder! Capt immediately shut down good engine. Rest was history- nobody hurt.
bob.
Hmmm I am surprised. With most Captains, that FO would have found himself in a hospital for a month taking his meals in through a tube attached to his arm.
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Old 14th Apr 2006, 14:38
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GCC, Right - for further useless info from me, I think it was the -336 (?), and the reason that they had to use a real a/c at PIK was that our sim was out of order 'coz us useless Sim Engs couldn't fix it (the drum was stuffed and we had to wait to get a new one from USA). Took a while, so pilots had to do their checks on the "real thing".

We did send a couple of our guys up there to recover anything useful from it; quite a few instruments etc that could obviously never be used on an aircraft, but were able to be cleaned up for the sims!
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Old 14th Apr 2006, 22:04
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Originally Posted by ExSimGuy
[COLOR=blue]GCC, Right - for further useless info from me, I think it was the -336 (?), .....
It was actually a -436 (Conway powered).
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Old 14th Apr 2006, 22:14
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707 lost engines

Does anyone know where I can find the article[s] on the 70 freighter than literally lost 2 engibes over France somewhere??

Thks
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Old 16th Apr 2006, 10:34
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TheShadow
14th January 1969 Milan initial climb-out BAC One-Eleven G-ASJJ
Started take-off run R/W18.....heard bang.....jump seat check captain thinks No1 engine....advises reduction a little later....pilot-in-command closes throttle, lowers nose, shuts down No1.....aircraft force-landed.
Bang was compressor surge in No2 engine and crew unaware that No2 thrust had been partially reduced after inadvertent displacement of No2 throttle lever.
[I remember reading the report many years ago, but I have checked against the Aviation Safety Network database....an excellent site..thank you.]
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Old 16th Apr 2006, 12:59
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Prestwick and simulated engine failures are not a good combo
17.03.77
Boeing 707-436 G-APFK (17712/164) British Airtours [year built: 1960]
occupants: 4 crew + 0 passengers = 4.
fatalities: 0 crew + 0 passengers = 0.
Training Take-off
A no.1 engine failure was simulated by retarding the throttle on take-off. The aircraft tended towards the left, forcing the instructor to take over control. The no.1 engine nacelle then struck the runway. The aircraft yawed and rolled violently to the right, sank back on the runway and pivoted sideways down the runway. The undercarriage collapsed and the engines were torn off.
PROBABLE CAUSE: "A loss of control which resulted from a delay in taking full corrective action during a simulated outboard engine failure exercise during take-off."
06.10.92 (15.22)
British Aerospace Jetstream 32 G-SUPR (956) British Aerospace
occupants: 2 crew + 0 passengers = 2.
fatalities: 2 crew + 0 passengers = 2.
Training Take-off
An engine failure was simulated during take-off. The aircraft climbed steeper than normal with the gear still extended. Ten seconds airborne, the co-pilot was attempting to find out which engine was simulated failed. The pilot reminded the co-pilot about the gear and retracted it. The stall warning horn sounded and the pilot took over control within 2 seconds and added power on the retarded engine. The Jetstream continued to roll to the right and struck the ground inverted.
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Old 17th Apr 2006, 18:21
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Question

17.03.77
Boeing 707-436 G-APFK
That was the one, though I could have swirn it was the 336 sim that was US at the time - the old Conway-powered simwas an analog one, and the reason our simwas down was a "didital" failure; we were told that they were doing the training at Prestwick because of teh simproblem and pilots with "check requirements" going out of time

Would it be possible that 436 pilots would do training on a 336?
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Old 20th Apr 2006, 19:04
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I was working for GF in BAH in 1976 and we had a very mixed fleet including 3 Skyvans that flew oil charters in Oman. One was flying over the desert when a prop autofeathered due to an oil px sw failing. The single pilot was dreaming at the time and felt the swing as the prop feathered and shut down the wrong engine. Managed to glide it down onto a road! One of the engineers flew out with a switch the following morning and Les, and the rescue Skyvan took off from the road back to Seeb.
Not the sort of thing you would associate with GF today, but then we had based at BAH,- 5 VC10 4 L1011 4 Bac111s 4 F27s 3 Skyvans, a Skyliner,2 Islanders and two Queen Airs.
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Old 22nd Apr 2006, 08:17
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Although not strictly shutting down the wrong engine, there was a close shave with a Dakota after the instructor reached across and caged the artificial horizon as the gear was retracting after take off. It was an instrument rating test and the take off was "under the hood".

Coincidental, and a classic example of Murphy's Law, the aircraft yawed and rolled sharply to starboard as the AH was caged. The pilot under the hood could see the instructor had not touched the throttle or mixture levers and so he called "engine failure No 2" and attempted to press the relevant feather button.

The instructor managed to stop the button from being actuated as there was no indications on the engine instruments that an engine had packed up. A quick glance outside revealed the rubber de-icing boot on the leading edge of the starboard wing had split asunder throughout its full length leading to a fairly dramatic loss of lift on that wing. The aircraft was landed safely after a circuit requiring full aileron and some rudder.

During the war there were several fatal accidents to Lancasters where following the failure of one engine, all four engines (props) feathered simultaneously with the actuation of one feathering button. One of these instances (fortunately non-fatal) was described in the book by Norman Mitchell called "Flight of the Halifax". Mitchell was a ferry pilot and lost all four engines in flight during a ferry flight after conducting a test feathering of one engine. A similar story emerged when the Australian magazine The Bulletin interviewed a former Australian bomb-aimer who managed to bale out at low level when all four engines feathered after the flight engineer had attempted to feather one engine that had lost power.

I personally experienced the same phenomenum while conducting an engine run up on a Lincoln bomber on the ground. On the pressing of one feathering button, the other three engines all feathered. The defect was traced to a short circuit in the metal cage surrounding the feathering buttons and the metal dimmer switch incorporated in each button. Where under certain circumstances the dimmer switch of any button touched the protective cage while that engine was being feathered, it sent a current to all the other buttons to feather the prop.
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